The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

Enhancing Students Language Skills through Blended Learning  pp223-232

Choosri Banditvilai

© Jul 2016 Volume 14 Issue 3, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Karin Levinsen, pp150 - 232

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Abstract

Abstract: This paper presents a case study of using blended learning to enhance students language skills and learner autonomy in an Asian university environment. Blended learning represents an educational environment for much of the world where computers and the Internet are readily available. It combines self‑study with valuable face‑to‑face interaction with a teacher. This study puts the spotlight on learning outcomes in an English for Specific Purposes (ESP) class in Thailand in which e‑learning str ategies are used in parallel with traditional classroom language teaching methods of the four language learning skills. These skills are listening, speaking, reading and writing. The achievements and attitudes of students were compared between the control group and the experimental group to measure the potential of available technology to develop language skills and learner autonomy. The findings from this study show that online practice is directly beneficial to enhance the four language learning skills as well as autonomous learning and learner motivation.

 

Keywords: Keywords: blended learning, e-learning, learner autonomy, Communicative Business English, English for Specific Purposes, ESP, motivation

 

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Journal Article

Impact of Communication Patterns, Network Positions and Social Dynamics Factors on Learning among Students in a CSCL Environment  pp72-85

Binod Sundararajan

© May 2009 Volume 7 Issue 1, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 85

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Abstract

At present, it is difficult to assess the quality of learning in Computer‑Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) environments, because standard pretest and posttest measures do not capture the differences in the learner's ability to engage in the material, pose interesting new questions, engage others in learning and work collaboratively. This research investigates the impact of communication patterns, network positions and social dynamics factors on students' self‑perception of learning in a CSCL environment. The study involved a combination of methodologies combining questionnaires, and archiving of communication logs for data collection. Social network analysis tools were used to analyze relational data, map emergent student communication patterns and calculate centrality scores based on the electronic and face‑to‑face communication patterns among class members in the CSCL environment. Structural equation modeling was then performed on the hypotheses model to determine the impact of these centrality measures and the social factors on students' perceptions of knowledge gained and their satisfaction with their performance in the course.

 

Keywords: Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning, CSCL, distance learning, social network analysis, social dynamics, respect, influence, structural equation modelling, path analysis, interaction, participation, motivation to participate and learn, satisfaction with performance, gaining new and conceptual knowledge

 

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Journal Article

Experiences Obtained with Integration of Student Response Systems for iPod Touch and iPhone into e‑Learning Environments  pp179-190

John Stav, Kjetil Nielsen, Gabrielle Hansen-Nygård, Trond Thorseth

© Mar 2010 Volume 8 Issue 2, ECEL 2009, Editor: Shirley Williams, Florin Salajan, pp51 - 208

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Abstract

A new type of Student Response System (SRS) based up on the latest wireless technologies and ; hand held mobile devices has been developed to enhance active learning methods and assess students' understanding. The key services involve a set of XML technologies, web services and modern mobile devices. A group consisting of engineers, scientists and instructors with pedagogical competence, from seven European countries has designed the services. The new SRS provides intuitive control interfaces, which an instructor quickly learns how to use, provides more flexible and cheaper response services than existing on‑site technologies based upon so‑called "clickers", since it uses the Wi‑Fi or mobile network to provide responses from students. The technology may be used for in‑class, laboratory and distance training purposes, the latter being an entirely new option in SRS technology. We report experiences from using this SRS technology in physics teaching in engineering classes, as well as in distance learning in Europe.

 

Keywords: student response system, iphone and ipod touch, e-learning, blended learning, voting systems, polling systems, clickers

 

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Journal Article

Experiences with use of Various Pedagogical Methods Utilizing a Student Response System – Motivation and Learning Outcome  pp169-181

Ketil Arnesen, Guri Sivertsen Korpås, Jon Eirik Hennissen, John Birger Stav

© Aug 2013 Volume 11 Issue 3, ECEL 2012, Editor: Hans Beldhuis and Koos Winnips, pp168 - 272

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Abstract

Abstract: This paper describes use of an online Student Response System (SRS) in a pre‑qualification course for engineering studies in Norway. The SRS in use, where students answer quizzes using handheld mobile devices like Smartphones, PADs, iPods etc., has been developed at Sør‑Trøndelag University College. The development of the SRS was co‑funded by the Lifelong Learning Program KA3‑ICT in 2009‑2010. SRS has been designed to help teachers effortlessly i) break the monotony of a lecture and allow the students to actively take part in the lecture, ii) increase teacher‑student interaction, and iii) give teacher and students immediate anonymous feedback on learning outcome. The response system was used in mathematics in two groups with different lecturers during two semesters in 2009‑2010. The pedagogical methods in use will be referred to as “Peer Instruction” and “Classic”. In each method the students will answer a multiple choice quiz using their mobile devices. In both cases the result of the quiz will immediately appear as a histogram on a screen in the classroom. The closing parts will also be identical. The lecturer then highlights the correct option in the histogram and explains why this option actually is the correct one. In the Peer Instruction method there will be an additional element. The first poll will be followed by a discussion in student groups, where the students are urged to defend their choice and convince their fellow students that their chosen option is the correct one. The discussion is then followed by a new individual voting session before the final results are shown and the closing part takes place. The paper will compare this method with the peer instruction method as described in existing literature. The learning outcome will be discussed according to interviews with students and the lecturers’ experiences from the classroom. In addition we will analyze students’ grades and test results in mathematics with respect to their expected level, based on previous achievements. We will present results showing that when students are arguing their point of view, they will have a stronger tendency to convince their fellow students when they themselves already have found the correct option in the quiz. Finally we will suggest pedagogical improvements for future use of response systems in mathematics. Input from lecturers and from students has already been used in the process of developing a new version of SRS, finished in January 2013.

 

Keywords: Keywords: student response systems, mobile learning, smartphones, peer instruction and learning, peer learning assessment systems, learning outcome

 

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Journal Article

Student Response (clicker) Systems: Preferences of Biomedical Physiology Students in Asian classes  pp347-356

Isabel Hwang, Kevin Wong, Shun Leung Lam, Paul Lam

© Oct 2015 Volume 13 Issue 5, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Karin Levinsen, pp317 - 445

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Abstract

Abstract: Student response systems (commonly called clickers) are valuable tools for engaging students in classroom interactions. In this study, we investigated the use of two types of response systems (a traditional clicker and a mobile device) by stud

 

Keywords: Keywords: Web-based response system, clickers, student perception, human physiology, classroom interaction

 

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Journal Article

Synthesizing Technology Adoption and Learners Approaches Towards Active Learning in Higher Education  pp442-451

Kevin Chan, George Cheung, Kelvin Wan, Ian Brown, Green Luk

© Dec 2015 Volume 13 Issue 6, ICEL 2015, Editor: Pandora Johnson, pp429 - 474

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Abstract

Abstract: In understanding how active and blended learning approaches with learning technologies engagement in undergraduate education, current research models tend to undermine the effect of learners variations, particularly regarding their styles and a pproaches to learning, on intention and use of learning technologies. This study contributes to further examine a working model for learning outcomes in higher education with the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) on SRS adoption attitude, and the Study Process Questionnaire (SPQ) on students approach to learning. Adopting a cross‑section observational design, the current study featured an online survey incorporating items UTAUT and SPQ. The survey was administered to 1627 und ergraduate students at a large comprehensive university in Hong Kong. Relationships between SRS adoption attitude, learning approaches, and learning outcomes in higher‑order thinking & learning and collaborative learning were analyzed with a structural eq uation model (SEM). A total of 3 latent factors, including four factors from UTAUT in Performance Expectancy, Effort Expectancy, and Deep Learning Approach from the SPQ, were identified in the structural model on students intention to adopt SRS in clas ses. Current results suggested that a model of active learning outcomes comprising both UTAUT constructs and deep learning approach. Model presented in the present study supported the UTAUT in predicting both behavioral intention and in adopting SRS in la rge classes of undergraduate education. Specifically, positive attitudes towards SRS use measured with the UTAUT, via a learning approach towards deep learning, accounted for variation on high‑impact learning including higher‑order thinking and collaborat ive learning. Results demonstrated that the process of technology adoption should be conceptualized in conjunction with learners diversity for explaining variation in adoption of technologies in the higher education context.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Technology adoption, Learning Approaches, Students Response System, SRS, Higher Education

 

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Journal Article

Climbing Up the Leaderboard: An Empirical Study of Applying Gamification Techniques to a Computer Programming Class  pp94-110

Panagiotis Fotaris, Theodoros Mastoras, Richard Leinfellner, Yasmine Rosunally

© Jan 2016 Volume 14 Issue 2, ECGBL 2015, Editor: Robin Munkvold, pp81 - 149

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Abstract

Abstract: Conventional taught learning practices often experience difficulties in keeping students motivated and engaged. Video games, however, are very successful at sustaining high levels of motivation and engagement through a set of tasks for hours wit hout apparent loss of focus. In addition, gamers solve complex problems within a gaming environment without feeling fatigue or frustration, as they would typically do with a comparable learning task. Based on this notion, the academic community is keen on exploring methods that can deliver deep learner engagement and has shown increased interest in adopting gamification ⠍ the integration of gaming elements, mechanics, and frameworks into non‑game situations and scenarios ⠍ as a means to increase stude nt engagement and improve information retention. Its effectiveness when applied to education has been debatable though, as attempts have generally been restricted to one‑dimensional approaches such as transposing a trivial reward system onto existing teac hing materials and/or assessments. Nevertheless, a gamified, multi‑dimensional, problem‑based learning approach can yield improved results even when applied to a very complex and traditionally dry task like the teaching of computer programming, as shown i n this paper. The presented quasi‑experimental study used a combination of instructor feedback, real time sequence of scored quizzes, and live coding to deliver a fully interactive learning experience. More specifically, the ⠜Kahoot!⠀ Classroom Respon se System (CRS), the classroom version of the TV game show ⠜Who Wants To Be A Millionaire?⠀, and Codecademy⠒s interactive platform formed the basis for a learning model which was applied to an entry‑level Python programming course. Students were t hus allowed to experience multiple interlocking methods similar to those commonly found in a top quality game experience. To assess gamification⠒s impact on learning, empirical data from the gamified group were compared to those from a control group who was taught through a traditional learning app

 

Keywords: Keywords: gamification, game-based learning, learning and teaching, technology enhanced learning, virtual learning environment, classroom response system, Kahoot, assessment, Higher Education

 

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