The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

Using Social Media to Support the Learning Needs of Future IS Security Professionals  pp29-38

Karen Neville, Ciara Heavin

© Feb 2013 Volume 11 Issue 1, ECGBL, Editor: Patrick Felicia, pp1 - 79

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Abstract

The emergence of social media has forced educators to think differently about the way learning occurs. Students and practitioners alike are using new technologies to connect with peers/colleagues, share ideas, resources and experiences for extracurricular activities. The social business gaming platform considered in this study leverages the social networking concept (an activity that all students actively participate in) in an academic environment. The primary objective of this technology is to foster a sense of ‘thinking outside the box’ and analytical ability through a medium that is widely accepted by students and graduates who have entered the workplace. Both the environment and problems are developed to adapt to suit any academic course from conducting research to proposing business solutions. This study was undertaken in order to develop information systems security (ISS) skillsets through the creation and facilitation of social business gaming, which allowed students to measure their performances of understanding as part of their on‑going learning. The online business game required students to apply what they have learned to problem situations and to further develop their understanding of ISS topics. The problems posed required that the learners had to prove that they understood the material being taught in the traditional lecture and could apply what they had learned in an online environment. The on‑going assessment component of the gaming network was used not just as an assessment for grades but also as a learning tool. This research focuses on a group of final year undergraduate students completing Bachelor of Science in Information Systems (IS). The online social game was utilised as part of the continual assessment process to evaluate group interaction, role‑playing, competition and learning in an ISS assignment.

 

Keywords: social media technology, social business gaming, digital game-based learning, DGBL, information systems, IS, information systems security, ISS, and student assessment and learning

 

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Journal Article

Cognitive Style and Attitudes Towards Using Online Learning and Assessment Methods  pp21-28

Martin Graff

© Nov 1999 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Roy Williams, pp1 - 50

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Abstract

The studies described in this paper sought to investigate several forms of online learning and assessment methods in terms their efficacy in facilitating student learning. The studies also sought to investigate how participants rated each method. Attitudes toward computer‑assisted learning were not related to performance on each of the online methods employed, whereas some relationships were noted between cognitive styles and online learning and assessment. Finally, evaluation feedback from participants indicated that each online task was rated positively. Implications of the findings for further implementation of online instructional methods are discussed.

 

Keywords: Cognitive style, literature search, online discussion, online assessment

 

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Journal Article

Interactive Technology Impact on Quality Distance Education  pp35-44

Samer Hijazi

© Nov 1999 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Roy Williams, pp1 - 50

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Abstract

This paper reports on a study to determine if existing technology is adequate for the delivery of quality distance education. The survey sample was 392 respondents from a non‑traditional graduate level. The study included 15 descriptive questions on course assessment and satisfaction. The three hypotheses used Chi‑square to find relationships between interactivity and three other variables: progress, communication mode, and the desire to take another course. Responses showed that taking a distance education course was worthwhile. Findings, recommendations and conclusion are included.

 

Keywords: Distance Education, Quality, Interactive, Technology Assessments, E-learning, Interactivity

 

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Journal Article

Integrating Distributed Learning with just‑in‑context Knowledge Management  pp45-50

Roy. Williams

© Nov 1999 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Roy Williams, pp1 - 50

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Abstract

This paper addresses some key design issues in e‑learning, and its integration with knowledge management. The underlying premise is that the purpose of e‑learning is useful knowledge, and that the design of e‑learning should therefore be integrated with the design of related knowledge management — particularly personal knowledge management. e‑learning will be explored using the notion of "distributed learning". Knowledge management will be explored using the notion of "just‑in‑context knowledge", emphasising both the contextual underpinning of knowledge, and its strategic value — that is to say its applied value, and its embeddedness in decision making processes. The potential for distributed learning to optimise shared resources is also explored.

 

Keywords: Distributed learning, e-learning, knowledge management, just-in-context knowledge management, digital learning, blended learning

 

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Journal Article

Delivering What Students say They Want On‑Line: Towards Academic Participation in the Enfranchisement of e‑Learners?  pp27-34

Richard Hall

© Feb 2006 Volume 4 Issue 1, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 111

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Abstract

Sustainable e‑Learning holds the promise of enabling higher education to meet the needs of a large and diverse market. Central to this is the response of academic staff teams in meeting the needs of individual learners, in order to enfranchise them within an evolving, enabling learning context. Enfranchisement is underpinned by the management of learner‑expectations in the value‑added nature of the on‑line learning experience. However, learner‑ enfranchisement demands that on‑line interaction is both accepted by academic teams and educationally liberating. Liberation requires meaningful existence, and hence active participation, within a 'supercomplex' world, in which both individual identities and the ability to manage information are tested. This paper assesses ways in which learner‑enfranchisement can be encouraged by academic teams. It pivots around the outcomes from student evaluations of a strategic e‑Learning implementation in one UK higher education institution. The conclusions that it draws focus upon strategies for adding pedagogic value, increasing academic participation and developing e‑Learning sustainability in order to enfranchise e‑learners. The argument highlights ways in which academic teams can move from a battery‑intensive approach to e‑Learning towards one that is more free‑ranging. It highlights how academic staff can increase the sustainable, inclusive value of the learning experience at a minimised cost. From this basis, it is argued that any extant disenfranchisement in the delivery of e‑Learning can begin to be addressed by increased team‑work. A by‑product for those teams is that in the very process of engaging their students, there is more hope that they will in‑turn become empowered within their own use of e‑Learning.

 

Keywords: Academic participation Learner-enfranchisement Teamwork Sustainability

 

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Journal Article

Implementing Courseware to Support Learning Through Real‑World Erroneous Examples: Students' Perceptions of Tertiary Courseware and Obstacles to Implementing Effective Delivery Through VLE  pp51-59

Rachada Monthienvichienchai, Erica Melis

© Feb 2006 Volume 4 Issue 1, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 111

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Abstract

This paper presents a study in a UK university that investigated how first‑year (freshman) Information Systems undergraduates perceive learning through courseware containing real‑world erroneous examples derived from their peers and what obstacles had to be overcome to implement effective e‑Learning support for using and creating such courseware. The study finds that students find the courseware very effective in dealing with their personal misconceptions while also providing other secondary pedagogic benefits for both students and lecturers.

 

Keywords: courseware, vicarious learning, and personalisation

 

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Journal Article

Encouraging Student Participation in an On‑line Course Using 'Pull' Initiatives Paul  pp68-79

Peachey Paul

© Aug 2010 Volume 4 Issue 1, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 111

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Abstract

This paper presents an empirical study involving initiatives that encouraged students to log onto online courses in entrepreneurship delivered by the University of Glamorgan. The aim of the research was to explore items of interest to the online students that may increase participation in the forums and hence potentially enhanced engagement with the course module. The online tutor created additional forums within the discussion board of the virtual learning environment (VLE) that included a variety of online games and quizzes that were relative to the module topic. The rationale that underpinned this initiative was to reduce the possible blandness of the VLE as perceived by some students. The games and quizzes were carefully designed to enhance knowledge in the subject and thereby provided additional learning opportunities. The initiative was also thought to assist in the formation of an online learning community. The study involved experimentation by the online tutor with subsequent observation of the behavioural patterns of the students. In one module, the dedicated social and games forums attracted 54% of the total postings for the module. The findings suggest that including online quizzes and games that are relevant to the taught subject can increase the participation levels of the students and possibly enhance the learning process. The findings of this study may inform the design, development and delivery of online learning programmes. The findings also inform strategies of good practice in online moderation and may help to reduce withdrawal rates, which are typically high in the field of e‑ learning (Potashnik and Capper, 1998).

 

Keywords: Virtual learning environment, Fun, Discussion forum, Participation, Games

 

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Journal Article

Providing 'Quality Care' to International Students Through On‑line Communication  pp80-87

Chris Perry

© Apr 2006 Volume 4 Issue 1, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 111

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Abstract

This paper evaluates an approach to dissertation supervision, designed to assist international students with their academic writing. It argues that a blended approach to supervision within a Virtual Learning Environment can provide high quality individualised care not otherwise available. This leads to deeper, critical learning and more meaningful participation in Higher Education.

 

Keywords: Computer mediated communication, academic writing, internationalisation, critical thinking

 

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