The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

Interactive Technology Impact on Quality Distance Education  pp35-44

Samer Hijazi

© Nov 1999 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Roy Williams, pp1 - 50

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Abstract

This paper reports on a study to determine if existing technology is adequate for the delivery of quality distance education. The survey sample was 392 respondents from a non‑traditional graduate level. The study included 15 descriptive questions on course assessment and satisfaction. The three hypotheses used Chi‑square to find relationships between interactivity and three other variables: progress, communication mode, and the desire to take another course. Responses showed that taking a distance education course was worthwhile. Findings, recommendations and conclusion are included.

 

Keywords: Distance Education, Quality, Interactive, Technology Assessments, E-learning, Interactivity

 

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Journal Article

Digital Games and the Hero's Journey in Management Workshops and Tertiary Education  pp3-15

Carsten Busch, Florian Conrad, Martin Steinicke

© Feb 2013 Volume 11 Issue 1, ECGBL, Editor: Patrick Felicia, pp1 - 79

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Abstract

Joseph Campbell's Monomyth not only provides a well‑proven pattern for successful storytelling, it may also help to guide teams and team leaders through the challenges of change and innovation processes. In project "HELD: Innovationsdramaturgie nach dem Heldenprinzip" researchers of the University of the Arts Berlin and the Berlin Gameslab, part of the University of Applied Sciences HTW‑Berlin, team up to examine the applicability of the Hero's Journey to change management using an adaptation of Campbell's pattern called „Heldenprinzip®“. The project's goal is not to teach the stages of the Monomyth as mere facts but to enable participants of training courses and interventions to actually experience its concepts using a portfolio of creative and aesthetic methods. While a pool of aesthetic methods ‑ like drawing, performing or role‑playing ‑ is already being used, the Gameslab subproject qualitatively researches the potentials for enriching and complementing these methods with interactive digital media and games. This paper discusses three types of game based learning treatments to be used in training and intervention sessions as well as teaching the Monomyth in a game based learning university course. The first option is providing participants with a game that follows the Hero's Journey and inducing them to reflect on the experience and its relation to the learning goal. An alternative strategy is to make participants go through a game sequence broaching issues that are relevant for a stage or the journey of change in general. Last but not least, digital equivalents of the non‑digital aesthetic methods can be constructed using digital games or digitally enhanced set‑ups for playful interactions. All three treatments have their merits and pitfalls, which are discussed in relation to the identified game‑based learning scenarios: self‑study, blended game‑based learning and face‑to‑face sessions. Furthermore, these scenarios are compared while specific techniques boundary conditions are highlighted.

 

Keywords: blended game-based learning, physically interactive digital games, hero's journey, innovation and change management training, teaching game-based learning

 

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Journal Article

Dynamic Pervasive Storytelling in Long Lasting Learning Games  pp192-206

Trygve Pløhn, Sandy Louchart, Trond Aalberg

© Mar 2015 Volume 13 Issue 3, ECGBL 2014, Editor: Busch-Steinicke, pp149 - 206

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Abstract

Abstract: Pervasive gaming is a reality‑based gaming genre originating from alternative theatrical forms in which the performance becomes a part of the players⠒ everyday life. In recent years much research has been done on pervasive gaming (Benford et al. 2005, Cheok et al. 2006, Jegers and Wiberg 2006) and its potential applications towards specific domains. Pervasive games have been effective with regards to advertising (VG 2009), education (Pløhn 2013) and social relationship building (Pløhn and Aalberg 2013). In pervasive games that take place over a long period of time, i.e. days or weeks, an important success criterion is to provide features that support in‑game awareness and increases the pervasiveness of the game according to the playe rs⠒ everyday life. However, given the nature of pervasive games, they also pose challenges when compared to more traditional gaming approaches, namely; 1) How can one make the game pervasive according to the players⠒ everyday life? and 2) How can on e support in‑game awareness?. This paper presents a Dynamic Pervasive Storytelling (DPS) approach and describes the design of the pervasive game Nuclear Mayhem (NM), a pervasive game designed to support a Web‑games development course at the Nord‑Trøn delag University College, Norway. NM ran parallel with the course and lasted for nine weeks and needed specific features both to become a part of the players⠒ everyday life and to remind the players about the ongoing game. DPS, as a model, is oriented t owards increasing the pervasiveness of the game and supporting a continuous level of player in‑game awareness through the use of real life events (RLE). DPS uses RLE as building blocks both to create the overall game story prior to the start of the game by incorporating elements of current affairs in its design and during the unfolding of the game as a mean to increase the pervasiveness and in‑game awareness of the experience. The paper concludes that DPS is a promising approach for creating a game stor y which increases the pervasiveness of the game and supports

 

Keywords: Keywords: pervasive games, game based learning, in-game awareness, interactive storytelling, media analysis, game mastering

 

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Journal Article

Learner‑Centred Teaching Contributes in Promising Results in Improving Learner Understanding and Motivation: A Case Study at Malaysia Tertiary Education  pp266-281

Wei-Li Yap, Mai Neo, Tse-Kian Neo

© Nov 2016 Volume 14 Issue 4, Editor: Guest Editors, Rozhan M. Idrus and Nurkhamimi Zainuddin, pp233 - 290

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Abstract

In Malaysia, traditional teaching is still a common approach among many lecturers. There have been many studies reported its limitations and many lecturers have started to adopt more learner‑centred teaching approach to promote better learner understanding and learner motivation. Throughout this effort, it is noticed there are lecturers who could not be assured and felt uncertain about this transition because they went through traditional teaching environment during their studies. Due to this, the effort in shifting from traditional teaching to a more learner‑centred teaching has been challenging and hard‑hitting. Nevertheless, educational and multimedia technology has played an important role in creating a more interesting and engaging learning environments for our digital natives in this 21st century. In this research, a framework is to be proposed based on Weimer’s Learner‑Centred Teaching model and through the incorporation of educational technology and multimedia technology in the learning environments. This proposed framework describes how this learner‑centred teaching environment could promote better learner experiences by increasing retention rate and improving learner motivation. This proposed framework is recommended through the triangulation results from pre‑test/ post‑test, learning environments surveys and students’ written comments, which in turn serves as a guideline for lecturers to identify how they could progressively shift to learner‑centred teaching environment.

 

Keywords: learner-centred teaching, interactive multimedia learning, learner motivation, learner understanding

 

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Journal Article

Teaching Aids and Work With Models in e‑Learning Environments  pp244-258

Kateřina Jančaříková, Antonín Jančařík

© Jun 2017 Volume 15 Issue 3, Editor: Jarmila Novotná and Antonín Jančařík, pp199 - 280

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Abstract

PISA study has defined several key areas to be paid attention to by teachers. One of these areas is work with models. The term model can be understood very broadly, it can refer to a drawing of a chemical reaction, a plastic model, a permanent mount (taxidermy) to advanced 3D projections. Teachers are no longer confined to teaching materials and aids available physically at schools. Thanks to information technology, models can be included in lessons almost without any limits. However, work with models is very specific due to the simple fact that a model always differs from what it represents. Efficiency of education using ICT can be affected negatively in case that work with complex models requires high level of abstraction which pupils are not capable of (Harrison and Treagust, 2000). Jančaříková (2015) points out that – due to the demands on upper secondary pupils – children must be taught how to relate models to real objects from very early stages. Linking an object to its model – isomorphism is the basis for successful work with models. Work with models thus must be developed systematically and consistently and included into teaching of younger learners. The scope of work with models in natural sciences is gradually increasing. However, the fact that we are able to project models to pupils using information technology does not mean that pupils will be able to understand them. In this paper we want to point out that not enough attention is paid to work with models (not only in the Czech Republic) – methodology of work with models does not exist and is not taught to pre‑service teachers. The paper classifies types of models we come across in lessons, describes basic differences between objects and reality they represent and proposes possible ways of systematic inclusion of models into teaching.

 

Keywords: models, projection, science education, 3D projections, interactive models, science education, biology

 

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Journal Article

Interactive Nonlinear Learning Environments  pp59-68

Ronald Robberecht

© Aug 2010 Volume 5 Issue 1, ECEL 2006, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 86

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Abstract

E‑learning materials often have a linear design where all learners are forced into a single‑mode pedagogy, which is contrary to the interaction that occurs in face‑to‑face learning. Ideally, e‑learning materials should be nonlinear, interactive, contain context‑sensitive and active learning elements, and accommodate various learning levels and styles. This paper presents an educator's perspective on approaches to designing such e‑learning materials, which are essential to enhancing the education of future generations of students.

 

Keywords: Interactive, nonlinear, e-learning environments, active learning

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 1 Issue 1 / Feb 2003  pp1‑50

Editor: Roy Williams

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Editorial

To paraphrase the old adage about the relationship between the US and the UK: when the dot‑com’s sneeze, e‑learning catches a cold. The shake out from the ICT dot‑coms crashes, exacerbated by 9‑11 and the US corporate governance scandals put a temporary damper on developments in the ICT and e‑learning sector. But a more realistic attitude to investment in the “knowledge/networked/ learning society” is surely a good thing.

This is a good time to step back and see where we are in e‑learning. So in November 2002 the European Conference on e‑learning was held at Brunel University in London. More than 40 academics and practitioners from the private and public sectors met to exchange ideas, from the Middle East, North America, and all parts of Europe. It was decided to launch an e‑journal to continue this discussion, to publish papers from the conference as well as from other contributors. This first edition of the Electronic Journal of e‑Learning (EJEL) includes a selection of papers presented at the conference. These papers reflect the challenging nature of designing, developing, managing and above all, evaluating e‑learning.

One of the benefits of the recent shakeout in ICT is that most people are now talking of blended learning – quite simply: using the media that are available, and no longer trying to squeeze everything through a not‑very‑broad‑band Internet, for instance. So, WebCD’s are OK, paper has its role, face to face training and learning is valuable, and the trick is to get the “blend” right. And there is still plenty that digitalisation will bring – in mobile/wireless technologies and broadband particularly. All of this is most welcome, and very healthy for the IT sector as well as for learning.

Research in e‑learning is now starting to provide a systematic critique of what might be called the first phase in the development of e‑learning. Up to now, much of the activity has been to get it up and running, to establish the three or four VLE platforms, at least one Open Source VLE – Bodington Common – (http://bodington.org/index.html) and to deliver the goods. That has been done. The second phase will be to develop the next generation of platforms, and provide more user‑friendly environments for learning, as opposed to just ensuring the delivery of courses.

But in order to do that, particularly in the current financial climate, we need to know what works, what fields e‑learning can be applied to, what other modes of communication and learning it fits best alongside – in a blended approach, and of course what it cannot do. We also need to know what it costs. It is crucial to realise that most e‑learning is just a new form of distance education, and that in all good distance education, the up‑front costs are considerable – it is front‑loaded as far as investment is concerned. And that investment is not just financial. The crucial element is to train and support staff and students who are making the substantial transition from face‑to‑face teaching and learning to e‑learning. As Tracy Kent writes in her paper, quoting from the JISC guidelines:

""the implementation of a VLE [Virtual Learning Environment] without significant investment in developing staff will almost certainly not produce good results"".

We welcome papers from anyone who has interesting empirical, theoretical or critical work that they would like to publish. We are also pleased to have case studies, reports on action research was well as reports on work‑in‑progress. All papers will be double blind refereed.

 

Keywords: e-learning, organisational learning, online learning, virtual learning, distance learning, knowledge, WEBCT, interactive, interactivity, distributed learning, blended learning, digital learning, knowledge management

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 4 Issue 1 / Mar 2006  pp1‑111

Editor: Shirley Williams

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Editorial

This conference edition of the EJEL contains a selection of the papers which were presented at the fourth European Conference on e‑Learning (ECEL) conference held in Amsterdam during November 2005. The papers selected for publication reflect the diversity of the conference.

E‑learning is a rapidly developing subject; within the last decade it has developed from a subject that was of little interest to academics in either their research or teaching, to a subject that produces high quality research and is used by many institutions. However there are still detractors from the e‑learning, who remain sceptical that is of any real value.

Throughout the conference the theme of presentations reflected the presenters' passion for e‑learning and the strong belief that e‑learners deserve high quality material and the impact of using e‑learning needs to be evaluated. It is with real empirical measurements alongside the passion of exponents that those who doubt the worth of e‑learning will be convinced.

 

Keywords: e-learning, organisational learning, online learning, virtual learning, distance learning, knowledge, WEBCT, interactive, interactivity, distributed learning, blended learning, digital learning, knowledge management

 

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