The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

A Web Based Intelligent Training System for SMEs  pp39-48

Roisin Mullins, Yanqing Duan

© Mar 2007 Volume 5 Issue 1, ECEL 2006, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 86

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Abstract

It is widely accepted that employees in small business suffer from a lack of knowledge and skills. This lack of skills means that small companies will miss out on new business opportunities. This is even more evident with respect to the adoption of Internet marketing in Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs). This paper reports a pilot research project TRIMAR, which aims to develop a web‑based intelligent training system to aid small business employees in their learning and decision‑making regarding the use of the Internet as a new marketing medium. TRIMAR attempts to contribute to the wider debate on the content and style of training most suitable to small businesses. It aims to identify the training needs of small businesses for Internet marketing at a pan‑European level and to seek the most effective ways to address training and support needs with web‑based systems. Based on training needs analysis carried out within five European countries: UK, Germany, Poland, Slovak Republic and Portugal, a web based system for gaining Internet marketing knowledge and skills was constructed. The system consists of three major subsystems: Self Assessment Tool (SAT), Training Modules (TM), and a Case Retrieval System (CRS). Various users through an online questionnaire tested the system. The initial feedback revealed that the case base training approach delivered on the Internet provided a highly appropriate training medium for SMEs.

 

Keywords: intelligent web-based training, Internet marketing, SMEs, training needs analysis, case based reasoning

 

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Journal Article

Face‑to‑face vs. Real‑time Clinical Education: no Significant Difference  pp287-296

Y.Q. Mohammed, G. Waddington, P. Donnan

© Feb 2008 Volume 5 Issue 4, e-Learning in Health Care, Editor: Pam Moule, pp251 - 304

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Abstract

The main objective of this pilot research project was to determine whether the use of an internet broadband link to stream physiotherapy clinical education workshop proceedings in "real‑time" is of equivalent educational value to the traditional face‑to‑face experience. This project looked at the benefits of using the above technology as an educational tool and its impact on educators only, it did not investigate possible related factors such as the cost of employing this technology nor the technicalities of setting up the proposed technology as these objectives were beyond the scope of the study. In 2006 three physiotherapy educators' workshops were selected for streaming at the University of Canberra. Two groups of educators attended the workshops at geographically separate venues, face‑to‑face (on‑site) and real‑time internet streaming (off‑site). Group one (on‑site) attended face‑to‑face lectures at the Canberra Hospital ACT Australia; lectures were streamed using a standard personal computer and digital camera to group two (off‑site) at the University of Canberra and Calvary Hospital ACT. At the end of the workshops all participants completed the questionnaire survey. Obtained results were analyzed using t‑tests. No significant difference was found between the participants' assessment of the educational value derived from either off or on‑site attendance at the workshop.

 

Keywords: face-to-face, real-time, educators, clinical education, interactions internet broadband, telemedicine, videoconferencing

 

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Journal Article

iSELF: The development of an Internet‑Tool for Self‑Evaluation and Learner Feedback  pp313-325

Nicolet Theunissen, Hester Stubb

© Jul 2014 Volume 12 Issue 4, Editor: Dr Rikke Ørngreen and Dr Karin Tweddell Levinsen, pp313 - 410

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Abstract

Abstract: This paper describes the theoretical basis and development of the iSELF: an Internet‑tool for Self‑Evaluation and Learner Feedback to stimulate self‑directed learning in ubiquitous learning environments. In ubiquitous learning, learners follow t heir own trails of interest, scaffolded by coaches, peers and tools for thinking and learning. Ubiquitous learning solutions include on‑ and off‑line, formal and informal learning. To benefit from its possibilities, learners need to develop competencies f or self‑directed learning. To do so, a self‑evaluation tool can help the learner to get insight in his/her own development, to manage and monitor his/her own learning process, to collaborate in learning, to relate the learning to 'real life' needs, and to take control over educational decisions. The iSELF was developed in an iterative process, complying to the following high level requirements: (1) Enabling learning anytime, anywhere; (2) Supporting self‑directed learning; (3) Evaluating learner, le arning solutions and job‑needs; (4) Assessing learner competencies; (5) Using card‑sort method for questionnaires; (6) Facilitating questionnaires 'under construction'; and (7) User‑friendly design. The resulting online tool contained a card‑sort module, looking somewhat like a 'solitaire' game, a profile module to evaluate core competencies, and a feedback module to suggest learning possibilities. For illustration, 14 different studies that contributed to the development of iSELF and to the devel opment of self‑evaluation questionnaires compliant to iSELF, are briefly discussed. These illustrative studies included various populations: e.g. students, employees from small and medium enterprises, crisis management organizations, and the military. Use fulness and usability of the self‑evaluation tool were valued positively. The iSELF contributes to an adaptive ubiquitous learning environment in which the learner can make the educational decisions according to self‑directed learning principles. The iSEL F will stimulate self‑directed learning in a ubiquitous le

 

Keywords: Keywords: self-evaluation, self-assessment, internet-tool, ubiquitous learning, self-directed learning, feedback

 

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Journal Article

Student Online Readiness Assessment Tools: A Systematic Review Approach  pp376-384

Farid Alem, Michel Plaisent, Prosper Bernard, Okoli Chitu

© Jul 2014 Volume 12 Issue 4, Editor: Dr Rikke Ørngreen and Dr Karin Tweddell Levinsen, pp313 - 410

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Abstract

Abstract: Although there are tools to assess students readiness in an online learning context, little is known about the psychometric properties of the tools used or not. A systematic review of 5107 published and unpublished papers identified in a litera ture search on student online readiness assessment tools between 1990 and 2010 was conducted. The objective of this paper was to identify via a systematic review different tools allowing to assess the level of students preparation in an online learning e nvironment and which were published or not in scientific journals, and determine which of these tools have been validated. The results of the systematic review show that a standard tool does not exist, and that only ten instruments have been developed and published over the past 20 years to assess students readiness. In addition, few tools published demonstrated good psychometric qualities, and many unpublished tools, considered as homemade tools, were internally developed in the universities by a team o f professors without regard to their psychometric quality. Also, it appears that the tools that were published in scientific journals are rarely used by universities that offer online courses. Generally, the universities prefer to develop their own instru ment that fits their online programs.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Systematic review of online preparedness, Tool Validity, Readiness for online learning, Internet-delivered training

 

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Journal Article

A cultural analysis of e‑Learning for China  pp82-89

Tim Friesner, Mike Hart

© Jan 2004 Volume 2 Issue 1, Special Issue for ECEL 2003, Editor: Roy Williams, pp1 - 239

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Abstract

 

Keywords: China, Internet, e-Learning, cultural analysis, marketing

 

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Journal Article

Does the Web Contain Pedagogically Informed Materials? The COSREW Outcomes  pp390-411

Athitaya Nitchot, Lester Gilbert

© Oct 2015 Volume 13 Issue 5, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Karin Levinsen, pp317 - 445

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Abstract

Abstract: Web resources allow a learner to have more opportunities for study at any time and any place. It is still difficult, however, for learners to choose the right study materials to match their desired learning. A competence‑based system for recomme nding study materials from the Web (COSREW) is proposed, based on the learners competences. COSREWgenerates a list of learning paths, and extracts search terms from the competence statements on the chosen learning path. Three experiments were conducted to evaluate COSREWs recommendations. The first explored the differences between search engines and the qualities of the study material links in helping learners achieve their competences. The second experiment explored the differences between search key words, and the third experiment comparedCOSREW with freely‑browsing learning modes. The results showed that the Web is currently not a good resource for a pedagogically informed competence‑based system, since Web pages predominantly comprise text‑based su bject matter content with little support for learning competence or capability.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Competency Model, Competence Structure, Web-based Learning, Internet Supported Learning, Pedagogy, Self-learning

 

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Journal Article

Research ethics in emerging forms of online learning: issues arising from a hypothetical study on a MOOC  pp286-296

Antonella Esposito

© Aug 2012 Volume 10 Issue 3, Special ECEL issue, Editor: Sue Greener and Asher Rospigliosi, pp257 - 379

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Abstract

Abstract: ReseaThis paper is concerned with how research ethics is evolving along with emerging online research methods and settings. In particular, it focuses on ethics issues implied in a hypothetical virtual ethnography study aiming to gain insights on participants experience in an emergent context of networked learning, namely a MOOC … Massive Online Open Course. A MOOC is a popular type of online open course, that provides free content and expertise to anyone in the world who wishes to enroll. The p urposes of this article are to briefly outline recent debates on online research ethics approaches and then to explore competing views on ethical decision‑making when researching in a globalized, online and open learning setting. Considering the challenge s of this new elearning inquiry context, issues as the underlying research ethics models, the roles of researcher and participants and the integrity of the research process are discussed in their interplay with the evolving ethos of the ethnographical met hodology being adopted to investigate participants views. Elements drawn from a hypothetical design of a qualitative study are here utilized to identify an empirical instance that shapes and is being shaped by research ethics decisions. The study aims to answer the following question: what are the affordances (opportunities and challenges) of online open courses as they emerge from the participants perspectives? This paper considers the potential operationalization of the above research question and d iscusses both theoretical and methodological issues arising from applying research ethics to this specific case of Internet inquiry. In this sense, ethical approaches in online research contexts as well as main ethical decisions are discussed and justifie d, envisioning a submission to an institutional ethics review board before undertaking the ethnographical study. Topics such as privacy concerns in a public online setting, choice between overt and covert research, researcher as observer or participant, n arrow or loosely defined application of the informed consent and anonymity are outlined, presenting a range of different options. This article intends to show that ethical decisions are an iterative procedure and an integral part of the research design pr ocess. Moreover, it endorses the opportunity to produce localized and contextualized ethical decision‑making. To this end, it takes into account the guidance available (research ethics literature; narratives of ethics procedures applied to empirical case s); the ethics debates within the ethnographical tradition and the nature of the setting being researched (the specific format of the networked learning instance being examined). The discussion here proposed orientates ethical decision‑making towards a n overt and participant research approach, an informed consent intended as a public notice and a consideration of participants both as authors in the online setting and as human subjects embedding unexpected privacy sensitiveness. However, such decision s are considered as many starting points to build a research ethics protocol intended to a degree as a work in progress, in a problem‑solving approach guided by the practical wisdom of participants emerging over time.rch has been fertile in producing stud ies on pedagogical change and innovation through technology in Higher Education Institutions, namely the integration of the social media in pedagogical practice. However, there is a lack of studies on the integration of the social media in the particular field of lectures. In this context, commonly practiced, the teacher faces a wide audience and feels the need to activate mechanisms of direct instruction, for reasons of economy of time and because it is the most dominant pedagogical model. As a result th ere is a communication paradigm 1.0 (one‑way communication, one‑to‑many, low or non‑existent interaction). In this study, exploratory and quantitative in nature, an approach to the thematic of the exploration of the social media in order to upgrade the cognitive communication from 1.0 to 2.0 (many‑to‑many, interaction between all the participants) in lectures was made. On the approach to the problem, we explored a PowerPoint presentation with the integration of the micro blogging tool Twitter, as a ba sis for addressing the characteristics of cognitive communication 2.0. For data collection a questionnaire was designed, based on literature, and intended to evaluate several dimensions of the resource used, namely: i) pedagogical issues, ii) technologi cal aspects, iii) cognitive learning; iv) interactions in the classroom; v) positive behavior in the classroom and vi) negative behaviour in the classroom. The results indicate that students recognize the potential of this tool in the dimensions asses sed. Twitter integration in PowerPoint allowed the teacher and the students to read each others views and each had the opportunity to contribute to the debate. It also allowed the release of multiple choice questions to the audience, with answers via Twi tter and projection of results via PowerPoint. This way, a true cognitive communication 2.0 took place.

 

Keywords: internet research ethics, massive online open courses, virtual ethnography, situated ethics

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 5 Issue 3, ICEL 2007 / Nov 2007  pp173‑250

Editor: Shirley Williams

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Editorial

The second International Conference on e‑Learning was held in New York during late June 2007. From the wealth of high quality papers submitted some 60 were selected for presentation at the conference. It was a very difficult task to select from these a group for inclusion in the journal, so it was decided that in this edition we would reflect the international nature of the conference and the diversity of learner groups and technologies addressed.

Recently a number of people from around the world have highlighted that children coming through the school system have different learning needs to previous generations, cultural and linguistic backgrounds are also cited as impacting on learning. However it is important that e‑Learning does not concentrate on a single demographic group and the papers in this edition present e‑Learning from different perspectives, including engaging with school‑aged children (O’Neill; Van de Sande and Leinhardt) and their teachers (Balcaen and Hirtz), through to the acceptance of e‑Learning by business (Leyking, Chikova and Loos). Nakayama, Yamamoto and Santiago have investigated the learning characteristics of university students from Japan and this on‑going work provides a useful insight for course developers, while Stoltenberg and Pforte look at the more technical aspects of e‑Learning and describe a prototype system developed for recording presentations.

 

Keywords: affective communication, affective states, assessment, community of practice, computing education, data warehouse, disaffection, distance education, education technology, eigenfaces, eigenvectors, evaluation system, data warehouse, face recognition, faculty development, focus group, higher education, image normalisation, impoverished learning, internet courses, junior faculty, novel program, ontology, ontology, pedagogical framework , performance metric, performance metric, policy document, post compulsory education, principal component analysis, professional development, quality evaluation, satisfaction, short-term module, staff development, statistics, teacher training, teaching practice, virtual entities, virtual environments, virtual learning environment, vocational students, web-based PBL, web-based SRL

 

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