The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

Integrating Distributed Learning with just‑in‑context Knowledge Management  pp45-50

Roy. Williams

© Nov 1999 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Roy Williams, pp1 - 50

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Abstract

This paper addresses some key design issues in e‑learning, and its integration with knowledge management. The underlying premise is that the purpose of e‑learning is useful knowledge, and that the design of e‑learning should therefore be integrated with the design of related knowledge management — particularly personal knowledge management. e‑learning will be explored using the notion of "distributed learning". Knowledge management will be explored using the notion of "just‑in‑context knowledge", emphasising both the contextual underpinning of knowledge, and its strategic value — that is to say its applied value, and its embeddedness in decision making processes. The potential for distributed learning to optimise shared resources is also explored.

 

Keywords: Distributed learning, e-learning, knowledge management, just-in-context knowledge management, digital learning, blended learning

 

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Journal Article

Development of the Novel e‑Learning System, "SPES NOVA" (Scalable Personality‑Adapted Education System with Networking of Views and Activities)  pp309-316

Ken Takeuchi, Manabu Murakami, Atsushi Kato, Ryuichi Akiyama, Hirotaka Honda, Hajime Nozawa, Ki-ichiro Sato

© Dec 2009 Volume 7 Issue 3, Special ICEL 2009 Issue, Editor: Florin Salajan and Avi Hyman, pp191 - 316

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Abstract

The Faculty of Industrial Science and Technology at Tokyo University of Science developed a two‑campus system to produce well‑trained engineers possessing both technical and humanistic traits. In their first year of study, students reside in dormitories in the natural setting of the Oshamambe campus located in Hokkaido, Japan. The education program at Oshamambe instills a rich appreciationawareness of humanity which especially enables them to empathize with nature. The faculty has been developing a novel e‑Learning system called SPES NOVA (Scalable Personality‑Adapted Education System with Networking of Views and Activities). SPES NOVA, which is intended to increase competency in communication skills, is based on a remote meeting system that is accessible simultaneously to multiple users via a Flash plug‑in on the Internet. To link users in separate locations, each user must have a headset and web cam attached to a personal computer with an Internet connection. At Oshamambe, the SPES NOVA e‑Learning system links the students to each other and to the professors. In one of the first applications of SPES NOVA, a student puts on a headset and sits in front of a computer equipped with a camera, and then accesses small‑group instruction of a humanity course based mainly on discussion. An electronic whiteboard is displayed at the center of the monitor, and live‑action shots of the users are arranged around the computer screen. The voice and picture data of the lecture are stored as educational materials on the server. Consequently, students can review an entire lecture as well as their own speech and behavior. The teacher can easily cut segments from the motion pictures of the lecture and combine them into teaching materials. SPES NOVA includes an e‑Learning system that distributes educational materials via a wireless LAN during instruction. The system has also been used effectively in an example of ubiquitous computing in laboratory training courses, which included small group instruction. The students are able to browse the systematic exposition of experimental techniques as well as learn the correct usage of experimental apparatus by using a portable video game player during experiments. The teaching materials contain not only the answers to possible questions, but also the lectures for the day. The e‑Learning system can record the laboratory training course lectures and then stream them back in video format. Furthermore, the portable video game player can save images as well as data from the experiments. This e‑Learning system is connected to the computer network on campus. Therefore, students can review the learning materials by using a personal computer before and after the laboratory training courses. When used during the small group instruction of the laboratory training course, this unique system effectively helps participants develop lecture note‑taking skills, hone communication skills, and learn the correct usage of the experimental apparatus used in liberal arts. Furthermore, with SPES NOVA, we can classify individual students not only according to their academic achievements, but also in relation to their behaviour, temperaments, and lifestyles. Subsequently, we can establish a recursive evaluation system for each student.

 

Keywords: blended learning, knowledge management, communication skill, small group instruction, laboratory training course

 

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Journal Article

ENTEL: A Case Study on Knowledge Networks and the Impact of Web 2.0 Technologies  pp385-395

Paul Griffiths, Teresita Arenas

© Jul 2014 Volume 12 Issue 4, Editor: Dr Rikke Ørngreen and Dr Karin Tweddell Levinsen, pp313 - 410

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Abstract

Abstract: This study re‑visits an organisation that defined its knowledge‑management strategy in 2008‑9 applying an established strategy‑intellectual capital alignment framework. It addresses questions How has knowledge management evolved at ENTEL, and w hat lessons can be learnt? Does the strategy‑knowledge management alignment framework applied at ENTEL in 2008‑9 still hold today?Ž The enquiry applies qualitative research in the form of a single case study, applying semi‑structured interviews and analy sing the evidence through coding at a phrase level. It arrives at some interesting findings, such as that leadership of communities of practice (COPs) is critical to their success, at least in the early stages of their implementation. Also that the inco rporation of generation Y (GY) into the workforce is changing the culture and openness to sharing knowledge, and thus accelerating the adoption of social networking (SN) tools, but the barriers to full deployment are still embedded in the older genera tion of senior and middle managers. Finally, it also emerges from the study that the paradigm by which organisations needed to choose between people‑driven and technology‑driven networks may no longer be valid: Due to changes in culture, to the need to sp eed up knowledge transfer, to the imperative for innovation and to the advent of low‑cost and low‑complexity SN technologies, organisations can make the most of both.

 

Keywords: Keywords: e-Learning, Web 2.0, Communities of Practice, Knowledge Management, Intellectual Capital

 

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Journal Article

The need for a strategic foundation for digital learning and knowledge management solutions  pp32-43

Mehdi Asgarkhani

© Jan 2004 Volume 2 Issue 1, Special Issue for ECEL 2003, Editor: Roy Williams, pp1 - 239

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Abstract

 

Keywords: Digital learning, knowledge management, e-Learning, strategic foundation, digital divide

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 1 Issue 1 / Feb 2003  pp1‑50

Editor: Roy Williams

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Editorial

To paraphrase the old adage about the relationship between the US and the UK: when the dot‑com’s sneeze, e‑learning catches a cold. The shake out from the ICT dot‑coms crashes, exacerbated by 9‑11 and the US corporate governance scandals put a temporary damper on developments in the ICT and e‑learning sector. But a more realistic attitude to investment in the “knowledge/networked/ learning society” is surely a good thing.

This is a good time to step back and see where we are in e‑learning. So in November 2002 the European Conference on e‑learning was held at Brunel University in London. More than 40 academics and practitioners from the private and public sectors met to exchange ideas, from the Middle East, North America, and all parts of Europe. It was decided to launch an e‑journal to continue this discussion, to publish papers from the conference as well as from other contributors. This first edition of the Electronic Journal of e‑Learning (EJEL) includes a selection of papers presented at the conference. These papers reflect the challenging nature of designing, developing, managing and above all, evaluating e‑learning.

One of the benefits of the recent shakeout in ICT is that most people are now talking of blended learning – quite simply: using the media that are available, and no longer trying to squeeze everything through a not‑very‑broad‑band Internet, for instance. So, WebCD’s are OK, paper has its role, face to face training and learning is valuable, and the trick is to get the “blend” right. And there is still plenty that digitalisation will bring – in mobile/wireless technologies and broadband particularly. All of this is most welcome, and very healthy for the IT sector as well as for learning.

Research in e‑learning is now starting to provide a systematic critique of what might be called the first phase in the development of e‑learning. Up to now, much of the activity has been to get it up and running, to establish the three or four VLE platforms, at least one Open Source VLE – Bodington Common – (http://bodington.org/index.html) and to deliver the goods. That has been done. The second phase will be to develop the next generation of platforms, and provide more user‑friendly environments for learning, as opposed to just ensuring the delivery of courses.

But in order to do that, particularly in the current financial climate, we need to know what works, what fields e‑learning can be applied to, what other modes of communication and learning it fits best alongside – in a blended approach, and of course what it cannot do. We also need to know what it costs. It is crucial to realise that most e‑learning is just a new form of distance education, and that in all good distance education, the up‑front costs are considerable – it is front‑loaded as far as investment is concerned. And that investment is not just financial. The crucial element is to train and support staff and students who are making the substantial transition from face‑to‑face teaching and learning to e‑learning. As Tracy Kent writes in her paper, quoting from the JISC guidelines:

""the implementation of a VLE [Virtual Learning Environment] without significant investment in developing staff will almost certainly not produce good results"".

We welcome papers from anyone who has interesting empirical, theoretical or critical work that they would like to publish. We are also pleased to have case studies, reports on action research was well as reports on work‑in‑progress. All papers will be double blind refereed.

 

Keywords: e-learning, organisational learning, online learning, virtual learning, distance learning, knowledge, WEBCT, interactive, interactivity, distributed learning, blended learning, digital learning, knowledge management

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 4 Issue 1 / Mar 2006  pp1‑111

Editor: Shirley Williams

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Editorial

This conference edition of the EJEL contains a selection of the papers which were presented at the fourth European Conference on e‑Learning (ECEL) conference held in Amsterdam during November 2005. The papers selected for publication reflect the diversity of the conference.

E‑learning is a rapidly developing subject; within the last decade it has developed from a subject that was of little interest to academics in either their research or teaching, to a subject that produces high quality research and is used by many institutions. However there are still detractors from the e‑learning, who remain sceptical that is of any real value.

Throughout the conference the theme of presentations reflected the presenters' passion for e‑learning and the strong belief that e‑learners deserve high quality material and the impact of using e‑learning needs to be evaluated. It is with real empirical measurements alongside the passion of exponents that those who doubt the worth of e‑learning will be convinced.

 

Keywords: e-learning, organisational learning, online learning, virtual learning, distance learning, knowledge, WEBCT, interactive, interactivity, distributed learning, blended learning, digital learning, knowledge management

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 4 Issue 2 / Jan 2006  pp111‑148

Editor: Shirley Williams

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Editorial

In this issue of the European Journal of e‑Learning there are a number of case studies relating to online communities and how they learn. The case studies relate to different areas: serving teachers (Evans and Bellet), students in healthcare (Moule) and psychology (Graff). The experiences reported here will be valuable to any readers who are trying to develop their own learning communities.

Learning communities need to be able to access and develop learning resources, the papers by Silva et al, and Alsutanny address issues related to presenting and representing learning objects.

 

Keywords: e-learning, organisational learning, online learning, virtual learning, distance learning, knowledge, WEBCT, interactive, interactivity, distributed learning, blended learning, digital learning, knowledge management

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 5 Issue 1, ECEL 2006 / Feb 2007  pp1‑86

Editor: Shirley Williams

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Keywords: e-learning, organisational learning, online learning, virtual learning, distance learning, knowledge, WEBCT, interactive, interactivity, distributed learning, blended learning, digital learning, knowledge management

 

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