The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

e‑Learning Success Model: an Information Systems Perspective  pp62-71

Anita Lee-Post

© May 2009 Volume 7 Issue 1, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 85

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Abstract

This paper reports the observations made and experience gained from developing and delivering an online quantitative methods course for Business undergraduates. Inspired by issues and challenges experienced in developing the online course, a model is advanced to address the question of how to guide the design, development, and delivery of successful e‑learning initiatives based on theories of a user‑centered information systems development paradigm. The benefits of using the proposed model for e‑learning success assessment is demonstrated through four cycles of action research after two action research cycles of pilot study. Findings from our empirical study confirm the value of an action research methodology for promoting e‑learning success. The paper concludes with a discussion on the merits of the proposed model in furthering our understanding of how to define, assess, and promote e‑learning success.

 

Keywords: e-learning success, e-learning assessment, action research, information systems success model

 

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Journal Article

Experiences with use of Various Pedagogical Methods Utilizing a Student Response System – Motivation and Learning Outcome  pp169-181

Ketil Arnesen, Guri Sivertsen Korpås, Jon Eirik Hennissen, John Birger Stav

© Aug 2013 Volume 11 Issue 3, ECEL 2012, Editor: Hans Beldhuis and Koos Winnips, pp168 - 272

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Abstract

Abstract: This paper describes use of an online Student Response System (SRS) in a pre‑qualification course for engineering studies in Norway. The SRS in use, where students answer quizzes using handheld mobile devices like Smartphones, PADs, iPods etc., has been developed at Sør‑Trøndelag University College. The development of the SRS was co‑funded by the Lifelong Learning Program KA3‑ICT in 2009‑2010. SRS has been designed to help teachers effortlessly i) break the monotony of a lecture and allow the students to actively take part in the lecture, ii) increase teacher‑student interaction, and iii) give teacher and students immediate anonymous feedback on learning outcome. The response system was used in mathematics in two groups with different lecturers during two semesters in 2009‑2010. The pedagogical methods in use will be referred to as “Peer Instruction” and “Classic”. In each method the students will answer a multiple choice quiz using their mobile devices. In both cases the result of the quiz will immediately appear as a histogram on a screen in the classroom. The closing parts will also be identical. The lecturer then highlights the correct option in the histogram and explains why this option actually is the correct one. In the Peer Instruction method there will be an additional element. The first poll will be followed by a discussion in student groups, where the students are urged to defend their choice and convince their fellow students that their chosen option is the correct one. The discussion is then followed by a new individual voting session before the final results are shown and the closing part takes place. The paper will compare this method with the peer instruction method as described in existing literature. The learning outcome will be discussed according to interviews with students and the lecturers’ experiences from the classroom. In addition we will analyze students’ grades and test results in mathematics with respect to their expected level, based on previous achievements. We will present results showing that when students are arguing their point of view, they will have a stronger tendency to convince their fellow students when they themselves already have found the correct option in the quiz. Finally we will suggest pedagogical improvements for future use of response systems in mathematics. Input from lecturers and from students has already been used in the process of developing a new version of SRS, finished in January 2013.

 

Keywords: Keywords: student response systems, mobile learning, smartphones, peer instruction and learning, peer learning assessment systems, learning outcome

 

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Journal Article

Impact of Learner's Characteristics and Learning Behaviour on Learning Performance during a Fully Online Course  pp396-410

Minoru Nakayama, Kouichi Mutsuura, Hiroh Yamamoto

© Jul 2014 Volume 12 Issue 4, Editor: Dr Rikke Ørngreen and Dr Karin Tweddell Levinsen, pp313 - 410

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Abstract

Abstract: A fully online learning environment requires effective learning management in order to promote pro‑active education. Since students notes are a reflection of the progress of their education, analysis of notes taken can be used to track the lear ning process of students who participate in fully online courses. This paper presents the causal relationships between students characteristics, note‑taking behaviour, learning experience, note assessment and test scores while the relationships between t hese metrics is examined. A fully online course for undergraduate students in Economics was conducted. Participants were asked to study each course module and present their notes to the lecturer every week. The students learning performance was then meas ured using online tests, weekly confirmation tests, and a final exam. The total number of valid participants in the courses was 53. Three factors of note‑taking behaviour were extracted according to the survey, and their relationships with other metrics w ere calculated. A structural equation modeling technique was used to track students learning activity as note‑taking occurred, using the scores of their metrics. The results of this modeling technique suggest that key factors and their contributions to t est scores can be measured. Also, the factors which contribute to note‑taking behaviour were examined.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Note taking, Fully online course, Learning assessment, Causal analysis

 

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