The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

MyGfL: A Lifelong Learning Platform for Malaysian Society  pp7-14

Zailan Arabee Abdul Salam, Azmi Mansur

© Feb 2006 Volume 4 Issue 1, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 111

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Abstract

MyGfL which stands for Malaysian Grid for Learning is a One‑Stop‑Center for quality assured online learning content, tools and services with the aim to promote and support the lifelong learning agenda in Malaysia. It is a platform that enables anyone to learn, unlearn and relearn from anywhere at anytime through any web browser so as to accelerate the growth of K‑Society. The main objectives of MyGfL are to enhance discoverability of e‑learning content from heterogeneous sources through the use of metadata, to develop e‑learning standards to ensure conformance and adoption of best practices in e‑learning content and systems, to provide e‑Learning systems and tools to enable and support e‑Learning activities and processes for the purpose of lifelong learning, and also to encourage the sharing and development of localindigenous content. Pilot programs have been conducted at different levels of the Malaysian society where processes and factors involved in implementing e‑learning to the community and observations of societal acceptance of e‑learning were noted. Utilization of MyGfL by the pilot groups has furnished vital information regarding acceptanceperception of use, current standards of computer literacy and skills. This case study will depict the impact of MyGfL with regards to its objectives and public perception towards MyGfL as a platform for lifelong learning.

 

Keywords: e-Learning, Lifelong Learning, Malaysian Grid for Learning, MyGfL, Learning Content

 

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Journal Article

Fluidity in the Networked Society ‑ Self‑initiated learning as a Digital Literacy Competence  pp52-62

Karin Tweddell Levinsen

© Apr 2011 Volume 9 Issue 1, ECEL 2010 special issue, Editor: Carlos Vaz de Carvalho, pp1 - 114

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Abstract

In the globalized economies e‑permeation has become a basic condition in our everyday lives. ICT can no longer be understood solely as artefacts and tools and computer‑related literacy are no longer restricted to the ability to operate digital tools for specific purposes. The network society, and therefore also eLearning are characterized by fluidity and the key competence for social actors in this ever changing e‑permeated environment is the ability to cope with change ‑ or Castells’ conceptualisation self‑programming. Castells’ theory has influenced international definitions of future key competencies. Both lifelong learning and digital literacy understood as "bildung" have emerged as central for the definitions of and standards for future key competencies. However, definitions and standards only tell us about the desired destination and outcome of digital competence building. They tell us nothing about how we may get there. In the educational system ICT and e‑learning are becoming an everyday condition and the basic challenge for the educational system is twofold: 1) The actually making of digital literate and self‑programming social actors – students and teachers; and 2) How to develop adequate designs for teaching and learning for that purpose. We need research that aims to describe the phenomenology of acquiring digital literacy and self‑programming in order to be able to identify relevant learning objectives and scaffolding. Findings from such studies are expected to be relevant for eLearning scenarios as well as for ICT and designs for learning in general. This paper presents a case study that aimed to explore the phenomenological appearance of self‑programming as agency and learning among postgraduate students who participated in a specially designed eLearning workshop in the autumn 2009. The findings relate to both the individual and collaborative barriers and proactive strategies that come into play among the students. Drawing on the findings, it is argued that the presented workshop design contributes to the networked society’s design for ICT, teaching and learning, as the design – at least for this small group of students – have proved to support the development of digital self‑programming as a sustainable competence. In the autumn 2010 the study will be expanded to a larger group of students.

 

Keywords: self-programming, lifelong learning, networked society, design for teaching and learning, eLearning

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 9 Issue 1, ECEL 2010 special issue / Apr 2011  pp1‑114

Editor: Carlos Vaz de Carvalho

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Editorial

Vaz e‑Learning is one of the most active fields of research and practice in Europe, in all the education and training sectors. The use of new and innovative technologies for learning is raising expectations and motivation between researchers, teachers, students and other education stakeholders.The European Conference on e‑Learning (ECEL) is an annual event that has been at the forefront of this revolution. It brings together groups of people in a variety of areas related to e‑Learning seeking to combine cutting‑edge research with practical, real‑life applications, in order to advance the state of e‑Learning around Europe.

The 9th European Conference on e‑Learning ‑ ECEL 2010 took place in Porto, Portugal. Porto is renowned for its historical City Centre (World Heritage) and its wine but also for being an innovation‑prone city which is an excellent environment for an e‑learning conference. This special edition of EJEL is dedicated to ECEL 2010.

With an initial submission of 220 abstracts, after the double blind, peer review process there were 97 papers published in the Conference Proceedings, an acceptance rate that places ECEL 2010 on the top of the conference quality rankings. The number of high‑quality submissions to the conference required a thorough process of selection by the session chairs and the editors to finally produce this edition of the journal. The selected articles cover different points of view of e‑learning from a more technological approach to a more pedagogical one.

The first set of articles is precisely concerned with technological aspects and in particular with the importance of computer aided assessment systems in the efficiency of e‑learning. Trevor Barker presents a study on the importance of automated feedback to provide good quality individual feedback to learners. He also demonstrates that these systems, by relieving the teachers from the exhaustive task of test marking can give them more time for communicating with students. Escudeiro and Cruz present a very innovative approach to the grading of students' answers in free text. Their work minimizes fluctuations in the evaluation criteria, improves detection of plagiarism, reduces the assessment process time and allows teachers to focus on the feedback to the students. Gütl, Lankmayr, Weinhofer and Höfler approach the design, development and validation of an automatic test item creation tool. This tool is able to extract concepts out of textual learning content and create different types of questions on the basis of those concepts.

To complete this more technically‑oriented view, Kurilovas, Bireniene and Serikoviene present a model and several scientific methods for the quality evaluation of Learning Objects (LOs). They pay special attention to their reusability level, in particular, when crossing linguistic barriers.

The second set of articles focus on pedagogical aspects of e‑learning and in particular, in students' related issues. Karin Levinsen presents new concepts related with e‑learning. She addresses the phenomenology of acquiring digital literacy and self‑programming in order to be able to identify relevant learning objectives and scaffolding.

Marques and Belo approach the profiling of student through their web usage habits. Through their investigations they can discover what students do, by establishing user navigation patterns on Web based platforms, and learn how they explore and search the sites’ pages that they visit. Nakayama and Yamamoto also address student issues by examining participants’ assessments made during the transitional phase in a learning environment which includes blended and fully online courses. O’Hara, Reis, Esteves, Brás and Branco focus on the effectiveness of learning through sports with the systematic integration of interactive situations in different contexts, with or without electronic devices. Sabey and Horrocks tackle the need for new electronic resources for health research for use within the context of a classroom taught course. They describe the process of developing an interactive resource incorporating a narrative element. Finally, Tuncay, Stanescu and Tuncay present a very innovative approach to the use of metaphors in e‑learning to reinforce communication between students and teachers.

As chair of ECEL 2010 and editor of this special edition of EJEL I feel privileged to have been in contact with such exciting thoughts, ideas and projects presented by the authors. It is now my pleasure to pass on to you this collection of articles, knowing for sure that they will motivate you to continue or even to start your research, development or use of e‑Learning as a major learning strategy. I also look forward to meeting you in Brighton, this autumn, for another fascinating ECEL conference.

 

Keywords: active learning, assessment, assessment in transition, automated systems, automated test item creation, blended learning, Clickstream analysis, computer-based assessment, design for teaching and learning, development, distance learning, e-assessment, eLearning, evaluation, evidence-based practice, feedback, free-text assisted grading, fully online learning, learning objects, lifelong learning, Markov chains, metaphors, multiple criteria decision analysis, narrative, natural language processing, Navigation paths analysis, networked society, nurse education, online learning, optimisation, quality evaluation, research methods teaching, reusability, self-directed learning, self-programming, skills acquisition, sport, student assessment, students, SurveyMonkey, task design, technology, text mining, web based elearning platforms, web usage profiling.

 

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