The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

Designing for Quality: The Understanding Dementia MOOC  pp161-171

Carolyn King, Jo-Anne Kelder, Kathleen Doherty et al

© May 2014 Volume 12 Issue 2, ECEL, Editor: Mélanie Ciussi, pp126 - 226

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Abstract

Abstract: The introduction of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) as a vehicle for education delivery presents opportunities and challenges. In the context of the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre (Wicking Centre), the driver to develop a MOOC was the promise of addressing the international deficit in evidence‑based dementia education, as well as the lack of research into international perspectives on dementia. The Wicking Centres activity integrates research and education, framed by the concept of quality of life across the trajectory of dementia. With dementia emerging as the public health issue of the 21st century, lack of dementia education at multiple levels, professional and non‑professional, is of increasing concern. The disrupt ive character of MOOCs, with associated risks and uncertainties, warranted the application of a research‑oriented project management approach to development. This included investing resources in gathering and analysing data to underpin each phase of decis ion‑making. We used a design‑based research approach incorporating the concept of life‑cycle of an e‑learning design (Phillips et al. 2012). Data collection and analysis focused on three dynamically interacting components: 1) expertise in dementia kn owledge and dementia education; 2) a cohort‑centric approach to design and delivery, and 3) models and designs for MOOCs currently promoted, discussed and reported in the higher education discipline. Laurillards Conversational Framework, relating types of learning, teaching‑learning activities and the digital technologies that support them (2012), informed the selection of digital technology elements for massive‑scale engagement of our identified cohort. The paper describes the initial design process and the outcomes of the limited release pilot that informed the first full offering of the MOOC.

 

Keywords: Keywords: MOOC, Open Education Resources, Dementia, Education, Online Learning, Design

 

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Journal Article

Assessment in Massive Open Online Courses  pp207-216

Wilfried Admiraal, Bart Huisman, Olga Pilli

© Apr 2015 Volume 13 Issue 4, ECEL 2014, Editor: Kim Long, pp205 - 315

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Abstract

Abstract: Open online distance learning in higher education has quickly gained popularity, expanded, and evolved, with Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) as the most recent development. New web technologies allow for scalable ways to deliver video lect ure content, implement social forums and track student progress in MOOCs. However, we remain limited in our ability to assess complex and open‑ended student assignments. In this paper, we present a study on various forms of assessment and their relationsh ip with the final exam score. In general, the reliability of both the self‑assessments and the peer assessments was high. Based on low correlations with final exam grades as well as with other assessment forms, we conclude that self‑assessments might not be a valid way to assess students performance in MOOCs. Yet the weekly quizzes and peer assessment significantly explained differences in students final exam scores, with one of the weekly quizzes as the strongest explanatory variable. We suggest that both self‑assessment and peer assessment would better be used as assessment for learning instead of assessment of learning. Future research on MOOCs implies a reconceptualization of education variables, including the role of assessment of students achiev ements.

 

Keywords: Keywords: MOOC, Open Online Learning, Higher education, Assessment, Peer assessment, Self-assessment, Quiz

 

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Journal Article

Adding Value: Open Online Learning and the MBA  pp250-259

Rachel Fitzgerald, Maggie Anderson, Ross Thompson

© Apr 2015 Volume 13 Issue 4, ECEL 2014, Editor: Kim Long, pp205 - 315

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Abstract

Abstract: A range of issues have emerged through the design of a MOOC project known as Gateway MBA. The Gateway MBA Project aims to extend the MBA Programme at Northampton Business School and this MOOC has a number of intentions. From a pedagogical pers pective the MOOC was created to give the student insight into the demands of postgraduate study while introducing a core area of the MBA, Critical Issues in Business. Evidence suggests that MOOCs are being used as a strategic tool to explore alternative models of course delivery (Allen & Seaman, 2013) and in this instance the MOOC aims to increase recruitment to the MBA internationally and to raise the profile of the university. While there are risks in this strategy, the Gateway project team see a po tential to introduce and market the MBA to a global audience through open online learning, raising the university brand profile and expanding the eLearning horizons of those involved in the project and beyond. This paper will consider recurring themes in the literature in the context of the design and delivery of the Gateway MBA. It is clear that reconciling MOOC values and aims with educational quality and learner satisfaction standards is problematic so this paper considers how we developed and embed i nnovations in the areas of technology and academic cultural practices in order to meet this challenge. Finally we will consider the issues and challenges in the design and delivery of a MOOC and will offer future considerations for sustainability.Evidence suggests that MOOCs are being used as a strategic tool to explore alternative models of course delivery (Allen & Seaman, 2013) and this paper shares insight into an example of such innovation for Business School Education. Gateway MBA draws on examples of open learning worldwide to create a MOOC to extend the MBA distance learning programme for Northampton Business School. The Gateway MOOC offers open online access to MBA education to develop recruitment to the MBA internationally and to raise the pro file of the university. While there are risks

 

Keywords: Keywords: MOOC, open practice, peer collaboration, disruptive technologies, MBA, online curriculum design

 

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Journal Article

Design Framework for an Adaptive MOOC Enhanced by Blended Learning: Supplementary Training and Personalized Learning for Teacher Professional Development  pp15-30

Karsten Gynther

© Apr 2016 Volume 14 Issue 1, ECEL 2015, Editor: Amanda Jefferies and Marija Cubric, pp1 - 80

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Abstract

Abstract: The research project has developed a design framework for an adaptive MOOC that complements the MOOC format with blended learning. The design framework consists of a design model and a series of learning design principles which can be used to d esign in‑service courses for teacher professional development. The framework has been evaluated by alpha‑testing and beta‑testing, and the relationship between design principles and the intended, the implemented and the attained designs has been analyzed. The project is methodologically inspired by Design Based Research.

 

Keywords: Keywords: adaptive learning, personalized curriculum, MOOC, blended learning, design based research

 

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Journal Article

Open Teaching: a New Way on E‑learning?  pp370-384

Andres Chiappe, Linda L. Lee

© Oct 2017 Volume 15 Issue 5, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Karin Levinsen, pp367 - 466

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Abstract

Open Teaching is currently considered an ambiguous and polysemic concept but has nevertheless become a growing global trend in ICT‑based education. To identify key issues on the subject, this article presents a study on Open teaching that combines meta‑synthesis and content analysis of research published over the last twenty years in major peer‑reviewed databases. Six main analytical categories emerge from data, conforming six groups of findings. Those findings show that Open Teaching has been associated with various concepts over the years and that there is no consensus on its meaning in the academic community. The current understanding of Open Teaching, that it is merely related to distance education, thwarts important practical and conceptual possibilities by prioritizing access as its main feature and ignoring important “openness” attributes, such as adaptation, sharing, remixing or collaboration. Moreover, the findings note that the most common means to implement Open Teaching as an ICT‑based practice are derived from the use of Open Educational Resources (OER) and via Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) which represents not only a major challenge for active educational practitioners but a new way of conceiving and implementing e‑learning in higher education.

 

Keywords: Open Teaching; Open Educational Practices; Open Educational Resources; MOOC; Information and Communication Technologies; Open Education; E-learning

 

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Journal Article

A Cross‑Modal Analysis of Learning Experience from a Learners Perspective  pp195-205

Bernard Nkuyubwatsi

© May 2014 Volume 12 Issue 2, ECEL, Editor: Mélanie Ciussi, pp126 - 226

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Abstract

Abstract: Learning experience has been one of the most debated aspects of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). Various perceptions on learning experience offered by MOOCs have led to many claims about the quality of these courses and their potential imp act on higher education in both developed and developing countries. This paper discusses, from a learners perspective, learning experience across four modes of learning: face‑to‑face, self‑guided/radio, online and MOOCs. My own educational experience exp anded across the first three mode of learning. To gain similar first‑hand experience in MOOCs, I enrolled in one cMOOC and twelve xMOOCs and studied these courses alongside other engaged learners. I conducted a cross‑case analysis of the four modes of lea rning and identified strengths and limitations of each mode. Then I organised recurring patterns across the four learning modes into five themes: openness, availability, diversity, flexibility and interactivity. I found that each of these learning modes c an help learners achieve a significant milestone in learning, and accomplishment in one mode can bridge across to a different learning mode. I argue that a combination of learning modes, where applicable, can lead to better learning experience than an exc lusive use of a single mode. I also argue that each of these modes can contribute enormously to learners educational, socio‑economic, and cross‑cultural migration as well as to their geographical mobility. Each of these modes can also contribute to bridg ing an educational divide if stakeholders in education capitalize on the target learners strengths, on existing access to media and on openness in terms of content, assessment and accreditation. This paper is likely to benefit educational stakeholders wh o want to open up access to education and to reach learners in underprivileged settings, and those who are interested in cross‑cultural education development.

 

Keywords: in cross-cultural education development.Keywords: learning experience, face-to-face learning, self-guided/radio learning, online learning, learning from MOOCs, cross-cultural education

 

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Journal Article

The Mediating Effects of Germane Cognitive Load on the Relationship Between Instructional Design and Students’ Future Behavioral Intention  pp174-187

Jamie Costley, Christopher Lange

© May 2017 Volume 15 Issue 2, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Karin Levinsen, pp105 - 198

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Abstract

Instructional design is an important aspect of the learning experience within formal online courses. One way in which online instructional design may benefit students is by increasing their future behavioral intention to use educational materials. This is important because research has revealed that students’ use of educational resources is strongly connected with academic success. Additionally, higher quality instructional design will increase students’ levels of germane cognitive load, which is a powerful indicator of learning. This study surveyed a group of students (n = 1314) who participated in formal online classes in South Korea to investigate the relationships between instructional design and germane load, germane load and future behavioral intention, as well as instructional design and future behavioral intention. Results showed positive correlation among each of these relationships. Furthermore, a mediation model was used, and results showed that germane load completely mediates the relationship between instructional design and future behavioral intention. These relationships are examined to better understand learning and future behavioral intention in relation to instructional design within online learning environments.

 

Keywords: behavioral intention, cognitive load, germane load, e-learning, instructional design, MOOC

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 15 Issue 2 / May 2017  pp105‑198

Editor: Rikke Ørngreen, Karin Levinsen

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Keywords: active learning, higher education, student learning, student engagement, online course design and development, interdisciplinary collaboration, frustrations, TESL students’ perceptions, hypermedia reading materials, reading comprehension, virtual containers, STEAM, Open Educational Resources, content distribution platforms, e-learning platform, foreign languages, multilingualism, idiomatic competence, e-learning; global health education; connectivity; bandwidth management; capacity building; educational technologies, Clicker technology, Facebook, and Wiley Plus, Web-based homework, behavioral intention, cognitive load, germane load, e-learning, instructional design, MOOC, online community, Computer Mediated Communication (CMC), Communities of Practice (CoPs), nonverbal communication

 

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