The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
For publication in December 2016: Special issue on Research Methodologies in e-Learning. See the Call for Papers for further details
Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop

Information about the current European Conference on e-Learning is available here

For infomation on the International Conference on eLearning, click here

For infomation on the European Conference on Games Based Learning clickhere

 

Journal Article

Integrating Distributed Learning with just‑in‑context Knowledge Management  pp45-50

Roy. Williams

© Nov 1999 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Roy Williams, pp1 - 50

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

This paper addresses some key design issues in e‑learning, and its integration with knowledge management. The underlying premise is that the purpose of e‑learning is useful knowledge, and that the design of e‑learning should therefore be integrated with the design of related knowledge management — particularly personal knowledge management. e‑learning will be explored using the notion of "distributed learning". Knowledge management will be explored using the notion of "just‑in‑context knowledge", emphasising both the contextual underpinning of knowledge, and its strategic value — that is to say its applied value, and its embeddedness in decision making processes. The potential for distributed learning to optimise shared resources is also explored.

 

Keywords: Distributed learning, e-learning, knowledge management, just-in-context knowledge management, digital learning, blended learning

 

Share |

Journal Article

Using Software Testing Techniques for Efficient Handling of Programming Exercises in an e‑Learning Platform  pp88-95

Joachim Schwieren, Gottfried Vossen, Peter Westerkamp

© Feb 2006 Volume 4 Issue 1, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 111

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

e‑Learning has become a major field of interest in recent years, and multiple approaches and solutions have been developed. A typical form of e‑learning application comprises exercise submission and assessment systems that allow students to work on assignments whenever and where they want (i.e., dislocated, asynchronous work). In basic computer science courses, programming exercises are widely used and courses usually have a very large number of participants. However, there is still no efficient way for supporting tutors to correct these exercises, as experience has shown that correction (and, beyond that, automatic grading) are difficult and time consuming. In this paper we present an enhancement of the xLx platform developed at the University of Muenster to efficiently support tutors in handling Java programming exercises electronically. The new component is based on concepts of automatic static and dynamic testing approaches, well known from software engineering, and provides an automatic pre‑ correction of submitted solutions. In addition, a tutor is able to annotate solutions manually, by adding comments that are associated with the source code of the solution in an intelligent way. Static tests are based on a compilation of the sources to find syntactical errors, while dynamic tests use test cases defined by tutors during the creation of the exercises and have to be executed correctly on the solutions in order to receive credits for the exercises.

 

Keywords: Programming exercises, Automatic pre-correction, e-Learning, Blended learning

 

Share |

Journal Article

Designing Online Instruction for Success: Future Oriented Motivation and Self‑Regulation  pp69-78

Joel T. Schmidt, Christian H. Werner

© Mar 2007 Volume 5 Issue 1, ECEL 2006, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 86

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Given the high rate of student drop‑out and withdrawal from courses and programs using an online learning format, it is important to consider innovative ways to foster and encourage student success in online environments. One such way is to incorporate aspects of student future orientation into the design of online instruction. This paper presents an overview of a program of research examining whether perceptions of student motivation, self‑regulation, and future time perspective can be positively influenced through future oriented instruction in a blended learning (semi‑virtual) environment at a German university. Individual differences in student future time orientation can provide insight into this interesting connection between the influence of attitude toward time on motivational and self‑regulatory processes in learning. In conclusion, the practical implications of this topic for the design of online learning environments must be considered: Increased effort needs to be taken for developing methods for online instruction to tap into and encourage the future orientation of students, and for providing meaningful connections to the content and possible future outcomes. This paper intends to provide insight into and examples of how an online course or semi‑virtual programs can benefit from a future oriented design.

 

Keywords: e-learning future time perspective self-regulated learning blended learning

 

Share |

Journal Article

The Impact of Learner Characteristics on Learning Performance in Hybrid Courses among Japanese Students  pp195-206

Minoru Nakayama, Hiroh Yamamoto, Rowena Santiago

© Aug 2010 Volume 5 Issue 3, ICEL 2007, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp173 - 250

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

To improve the management of hybrid courses, the relationship between learner characteristics and learning performance was analyzed in two regular university courses. Undergraduate and graduate students participated in two 15‑week hybrid courses which consisted of face‑to‑face lectures (Information Industrial issues), and the corresponding modules with online test. Subjects included 36 freshmen and 48 graduate students. Learner characteristics, consisting of motivation, personality, thinking styles and learners? impression of their e‑Learning experiences were measured at the beginning and end of the term. Additional data was collected from the number of days attended, the number of modules completed, test scores and final grades for the course. Final assessment grades for the class were also analyzed. There was no significant difference in learner characteristics between bachelors and masters students who completed the course. There was no significant difference in learner characteristics between bachelor and master students, but there were some differences in conscientiousness scores between masters and bachelor students and between those who received a final grade of A and B. Scores on "learning strategy" as a factor to indicate learning experience were in favour of master students. Master students? evaluation of their e‑Learning experience increased significantly throughout the course. Conscientiousness (one of the five factors in the personality construct) correlated positively with the number of e‑ Learning modules completed by master students (r=0.35). They seem to understand better the benefits of e‑Learning experience and being the more motivated students, they applied what they have learned from previous e‑Learning experiences more effectively. Students with high grades evaluated their e‑Learning experience positively and had significantly higher conscientiousness scores than master students who received lower grades (p<0.05). For bachelor students, the number of modules completed correlates with both intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. Other learner characteristics did not affect learning performance. The reason may be that bachelor students have yet to understand well the benefits of e‑Learning and still lack the learning strategies needed for university coursework. The causal analysis was conducted using Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) technique, and the result indicated that learner characteristics had an effect on learning experience and learning performance. These results suggest that understanding the benefits of e‑Learning and learner characteristics, as well as knowing how to learn with e‑Learning content could provide important key for promoting student success in online learning.

 

Keywords: learner characteristics, blended learning, learning practice, learning performance, path analysis

 

Share |

Journal Article

An e‑Class in Action: Experiences with ICT‑intensive Teaching and Learning of Discrete Dynamical Models at Secondary School  pp41-53

André Heck, Harm Houwing, Cor de Beurs

© May 2009 Volume 7 Issue 1, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 85

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

In 2007, a small team of university and secondary school teachers jointly developed and piloted an e‑class for 4 and 5 grade students (age: 16‑17yrs) at both pre‑university and general vocational level. The goal was to develop and try out innovative ways of teaching mathematics that would enable schools to offer optional courses for small numbers of students. The e‑class can be summarized as web‑supported instruction in a blended learning approach. The instructional material consisted of the chapter on discrete dynamical models from a brand‑new mathematics textbook, supplemented by investigative activities. Students could build and simulate dynamical models with the computer learning environment Coach. Instructions for learning to work with software were given through screen casts created by the teacher to gear with students' needs and made available in the Sakai‑based virtual learning environment. Students got weekly on‑line assignments, which they submitted digi‑ tally. At home they could get assistance from peers and the teacher in a chat room. We discuss some of the e‑ ingredients of the e‑class and their potential for teaching and learning mathematics and science in terms of principled design approaches to multimedia learning and pedagogical arrangements. We report the experiences of the participants of the project and present the future plans based on this work.

 

Keywords: e-learning, blended learning, multimedia learning, e-learning implementation, screen casts, secondary mathematics education, discrete dynamic models

 

Share |

Journal Article

Building the Future Students' Blended Learning Experiences from Current Research Findings  pp133-140

Amanda Jefferies, Ruth Hyde

© Mar 2010 Volume 8 Issue 2, ECEL 2009, Editor: Shirley Williams, Florin Salajan, pp51 - 208

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Between March 2007 and February 2009, the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) funded a Learners Journeys project at the University of Hertfordshire. This was part of their second phase of investment in research into the Learners' Experiences through their E‑Learning Programme and was known as LXP2. STROLL (STudent Reflections On Lifelong e‑Learning), as the Learners' Journeys project was known, researched into the experiences of current undergraduate students in Higher Education (HE) and Further Education (FE) primarily through a series of diaries constructed by student volunteers. Using video and audio recording to capture students' own reflections on their learning and their use of technology over the 2 year period the project data has offered many reflections from students on their use of technology for both learning and leisure. Building on this and other recent research data, the authors now suggest that for many HE students, technology has become a ubiquitous part of their lives to the extent that they may own or access regularly multiple items of personal technology that are used interchangeably for learning and leisure, including their computers and their mp3 players. At the University of Hertfordshire access to technology enhanced learning has included use of the managed learning environment (MLE) which is called StudyNet. This MLE has been highly praised by the campus‑based undergraduates and especially those participating in STROLL for making their learning accessible wherever and whenever they want to access it. In this paper we explore how academics might learn from the experience of these current students and their reflections on becoming effective learners supported by technology. This research indicates that technology can be a vital support for students in their complex balancing act between their busy studying, working and personal lives and the students have enthusiastically reported that technology is a key enabler for them. This paper presents the ways in which students use technology in HE and raises the questions of how institutions might support some of the diverse needs of future students.

 

Keywords: student experience, blended learning, technology use, reflection

 

Share |

Journal Article

Collaborative Language Learning for Professional Adults  pp161-172

Linda Joy Mesh

© Mar 2010 Volume 8 Issue 2, ECEL 2009, Editor: Shirley Williams, Florin Salajan, pp51 - 208

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Institutions of higher education realise the importance of the role of learning organisations in terms of providing personnel training and updating. Yet further consideration should be given to flexible and accessible means for meeting the growing request for continuous learning. Jason Hughes describes an organization's capability to learn how to learn as a fundamental change in the outlook towards learning, not only by providing training for short‑term skill gaps, but by engaging in an ongoing approach for the development of learning opportunities which encourage innovation and enable a more proactive outlook by organizations. Sustainable support for educational development using new technologies in education depends on having a basic roadmap that links current demands for developmental support to a plan for ways in which longer term needs will be recognized and met. The growing demand for continued learning of a second language is evident within the workplace where new technologies offer flexible solutions. In order to meet the special needs of professional adults the University of Siena Language Center (CLA) has developed a multiple‑level series of blended English courses from beginner to intermediate levels for life‑long learners including the hospital staff of the Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese (AOUS), the employees of a local bank and university technical‑administrative personnel. The pedagogical approach takes into consideration both the needs of adults who are working full‑time and the aims of the curriculum, which are to develop the four linguistic abilities of reading, writing, listening and speaking up to the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) Level B1. Taking into consideration a constructive use of teaching hours, classrooms and, above all, the limited time available to adult learners, a blended approach was chosen. This paper will present conclusions regarding the effectiveness of the blended approach for continuous learning of a second language (L2) by adult learners. Through a primarily qualitative analysis of formative and summative course evaluation data we illustrate that communicative language learning online in collaborative activities fosters improvement in second‑language writing and reading comprehension skills, while face‑to‑face (f2f) lessons were found to be useful for the development of conversation and listening comprehension. This paper also demonstrates that online collaborative learning activities in English for specific purposes (ESP) can increase communicative ability, stimulate motivation and provide a flexible context for language learning which adults view as a definite advantage for structuring study time when and where it is most convenient.

 

Keywords: continuous learning, connectedness, blended learning, CMC, second language

 

Share |

Journal Article

Experiences Obtained with Integration of Student Response Systems for iPod Touch and iPhone into e‑Learning Environments  pp179-190

John Stav, Kjetil Nielsen, Gabrielle Hansen-Nygård, Trond Thorseth

© Mar 2010 Volume 8 Issue 2, ECEL 2009, Editor: Shirley Williams, Florin Salajan, pp51 - 208

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

A new type of Student Response System (SRS) based up on the latest wireless technologies and ; hand held mobile devices has been developed to enhance active learning methods and assess students' understanding. The key services involve a set of XML technologies, web services and modern mobile devices. A group consisting of engineers, scientists and instructors with pedagogical competence, from seven European countries has designed the services. The new SRS provides intuitive control interfaces, which an instructor quickly learns how to use, provides more flexible and cheaper response services than existing on‑site technologies based upon so‑called "clickers", since it uses the Wi‑Fi or mobile network to provide responses from students. The technology may be used for in‑class, laboratory and distance training purposes, the latter being an entirely new option in SRS technology. We report experiences from using this SRS technology in physics teaching in engineering classes, as well as in distance learning in Europe.

 

Keywords: student response system, iphone and ipod touch, e-learning, blended learning, voting systems, polling systems, clickers

 

Share |