The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

Providing 'Quality Care' to International Students Through On‑line Communication  pp80-87

Chris Perry

© Apr 2006 Volume 4 Issue 1, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 111

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Abstract

This paper evaluates an approach to dissertation supervision, designed to assist international students with their academic writing. It argues that a blended approach to supervision within a Virtual Learning Environment can provide high quality individualised care not otherwise available. This leads to deeper, critical learning and more meaningful participation in Higher Education.

 

Keywords: Computer mediated communication, academic writing, internationalisation, critical thinking

 

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Journal Article

Agent‑based Collaborative Affective e‑Learning Framework  pp123-134

Mahmoud Neji, Mohamed Ben Ammar

© Aug 2007 Volume 5 Issue 2, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp87 - 173

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Abstract

Based on facial expression (FE), this paper explores the possible use of the affective communication in virtual environments (VEs). The attention of affective communication is examined and some research ideas for developing affective communication in virtual environments are proposed. We place an emphasis on communication between virtual entities, which make use of other data apart from the information being communicated. In particular, we explore the capacity of VEs to communicate affective states, i.e. those aspects of communication concerned with emotional response, and discover how agents within VEs can model and use affective states to enhance the realism of the VEs. Moreover, we discuss the social intelligence that renders affective behaviours of software agents and its application to a collaborative learning system. We argue that socially appropriate affective behaviours would provide a new dimension for collaborative e‑learning systems.

 

Keywords: affective communication, virtual environments, virtual entities, affective states, e-learning systems

 

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Journal Article

Bridging the Gap — Taking the Distance out of e‑Learning  pp42-51

Peter Karlsudd, Yael TÃ¥gerud

© Mar 2008 Volume 6 Issue 1, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 75

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Abstract

In order to promote closer relations between two existing academic environments — on‑campus and distance learning — a pedagogical intervention was made aiming to raise the level of competence and awareness among faculty regarding flexible learning and the use of ICT in higher education. The intervention was a process‑oriented pedagogical effort based on collaborative learning and cross‑institutional cooperation. Teacher teams worked to enhance flexible learning in either new or existing courses. The intervention resulted in more teachers getting involved in flexible learning. At the same time several problems surfaced indicating the need for further competence development efforts in order to further promote flexible learning environments.

 

Keywords: distance learning, flexible learning, higher education, ICT, information and communication technology, pedagogical development

 

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Journal Article

Blended Learning in the Visual Communications Classroom: Student Reflections on a Multimedia Course  pp247-256

Jennifer George-Palilonis, Vincent Filak

© Dec 2009 Volume 7 Issue 3, Special ICEL 2009 Issue, Editor: Florin Salajan and Avi Hyman, pp191 - 316

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Abstract

Advances in digital technology and a rapidly evolving media landscape continue to dramatically change teaching and learning. Among these changes is the emergence of multimedia teaching and learning tools, online degree programs, and hybrid classes that blend traditional and digital content delivery. At the same time, visual communication programs that are traditionally print‑centric have had to make room for Web design and multimedia storytelling courses, as well as technical skills development. To add parsimony to these two areas of study, we chronicle how a blended model has been introduced in a required, 100‑level visual communication course through a longitudinal study that followed 174 students through two versions of the same course, one that used blended learning strategies and one that participated in a more traditional method of course delivery. In combining an analysis of statements made by the participants in weekly journals (n=13,552) and the data gathered through a survey (n=174), we compared reactions between the two groups. Additionally, qualitative data from the journals was used to fully explicate the reactions students had to the course. This study sheds light on the effectiveness of a blended model in the context of students' enjoyment, engagement, and perceived learning outcomes. The results revealed that the blended model was in no way different from the traditional course in terms of engagement and attachment. Journal data revealed students in the blended sections were significantly less negative about the course material, personal achievement, technology, and their emotional reactions than their traditional counterparts. Additionally, statements made by students regarding the issue of fear of the course and problems regarding technology substantially faded over the 15‑week semester. Our overall findings indicate that students are able to adapt well to the technology and processes that make blended learning different from traditional classroom learning. Implications for pedagogy and future research are discussed.

 

Keywords: blended learning, visual communication, multimedia teaching and learning

 

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Journal Article

Development of the Novel e‑Learning System, "SPES NOVA" (Scalable Personality‑Adapted Education System with Networking of Views and Activities)  pp309-316

Ken Takeuchi, Manabu Murakami, Atsushi Kato, Ryuichi Akiyama, Hirotaka Honda, Hajime Nozawa, Ki-ichiro Sato

© Dec 2009 Volume 7 Issue 3, Special ICEL 2009 Issue, Editor: Florin Salajan and Avi Hyman, pp191 - 316

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Abstract

The Faculty of Industrial Science and Technology at Tokyo University of Science developed a two‑campus system to produce well‑trained engineers possessing both technical and humanistic traits. In their first year of study, students reside in dormitories in the natural setting of the Oshamambe campus located in Hokkaido, Japan. The education program at Oshamambe instills a rich appreciationawareness of humanity which especially enables them to empathize with nature. The faculty has been developing a novel e‑Learning system called SPES NOVA (Scalable Personality‑Adapted Education System with Networking of Views and Activities). SPES NOVA, which is intended to increase competency in communication skills, is based on a remote meeting system that is accessible simultaneously to multiple users via a Flash plug‑in on the Internet. To link users in separate locations, each user must have a headset and web cam attached to a personal computer with an Internet connection. At Oshamambe, the SPES NOVA e‑Learning system links the students to each other and to the professors. In one of the first applications of SPES NOVA, a student puts on a headset and sits in front of a computer equipped with a camera, and then accesses small‑group instruction of a humanity course based mainly on discussion. An electronic whiteboard is displayed at the center of the monitor, and live‑action shots of the users are arranged around the computer screen. The voice and picture data of the lecture are stored as educational materials on the server. Consequently, students can review an entire lecture as well as their own speech and behavior. The teacher can easily cut segments from the motion pictures of the lecture and combine them into teaching materials. SPES NOVA includes an e‑Learning system that distributes educational materials via a wireless LAN during instruction. The system has also been used effectively in an example of ubiquitous computing in laboratory training courses, which included small group instruction. The students are able to browse the systematic exposition of experimental techniques as well as learn the correct usage of experimental apparatus by using a portable video game player during experiments. The teaching materials contain not only the answers to possible questions, but also the lectures for the day. The e‑Learning system can record the laboratory training course lectures and then stream them back in video format. Furthermore, the portable video game player can save images as well as data from the experiments. This e‑Learning system is connected to the computer network on campus. Therefore, students can review the learning materials by using a personal computer before and after the laboratory training courses. When used during the small group instruction of the laboratory training course, this unique system effectively helps participants develop lecture note‑taking skills, hone communication skills, and learn the correct usage of the experimental apparatus used in liberal arts. Furthermore, with SPES NOVA, we can classify individual students not only according to their academic achievements, but also in relation to their behaviour, temperaments, and lifestyles. Subsequently, we can establish a recursive evaluation system for each student.

 

Keywords: blended learning, knowledge management, communication skill, small group instruction, laboratory training course

 

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Journal Article

Cognitive communication 2.0 in Higher Education: to tweet or not to tweet?  pp264-276

António Andrade, Cornélia Castro, Sérgio André Ferreira

© Aug 2012 Volume 10 Issue 3, Special ECEL issue, Editor: Sue Greener and Asher Rospigliosi, pp257 - 379

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Abstract

Abstract: Research has been fertile in producing studies on pedagogical change and innovation through technology in Higher Education Institutions, namely the integration of the social media in pedagogical practice. However, there is a lack of studies on t he integration of the social media in the particular field of lectures. In this context, commonly practiced, the teacher faces a wide audience and feels the need to activate mechanisms of direct instruction, for reasons of economy of time and because it i s the most dominant pedagogical model. As a result there is a communication paradigm 1.0 (one‑way communication, one‑to‑many, low or non‑existent interaction). In this study, exploratory and quantitative in nature, an approach to the thematic of the exp loration of the social media in order to upgrade the cognitive communication from 1.0 to 2.0 (many‑to‑many, interaction between all the participants) in lectures was made. On the approach to the problem, we explored a PowerPoint presentation with the in tegration of the micro blogging tool Twitter, as a basis for addressing the characteristics of cognitive communication 2.0. For data collection a questionnaire was designed, based on literature, and intended to evaluate several dimensions of the resource used, namely: i) pedagogical issues, ii) technological aspects, iii) cognitive learning; iv) interactions in the classroom; v) positive behavior in the classroom and vi) negative behaviour in the classroom. The results indicate that students recogni ze the potential of this tool in the dimensions assessed. Twitter integration in PowerPoint allowed the teacher and the students to read each others views and each had the opportunity to contribute to the debate. It also allowed the release of multiple c hoice questions to the audience, with answers via Twitter and projection of results via PowerPoint. This way, a true cognitive communication 2.0 took place.

 

Keywords: Keywords: classroom, cognitive communication, learning, micro blogging, Twitter, web 2.0

 

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Journal Article

The use of templates to manage on‑line discussion forums  pp12-19

Shafqat Ali, Graeme Salter

© Jan 2004 Volume 2 Issue 1, Special Issue for ECEL 2003, Editor: Roy Williams, pp1 - 239

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Abstract

 

Keywords: Collaboration, Discussion Forum, CMC, Asynchronous Communication, e-Learning, Higher Education, Templates, Collaborative Learning

 

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Journal Article

Adopting a web‑based collaborative tool to support the Manchester Method approach to learning  pp62-69

Philip Drinkwater, Christine Adeline, Simon French, Nadia Papamichail, Tudor Rickards

© Jan 2004 Volume 2 Issue 1, Special Issue for ECEL 2003, Editor: Roy Williams, pp1 - 239

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Abstract

 

Keywords: Copmuter mediated communication, collaborative tools, group work, Information and Communication Technologies, ICT's, teaching and learning strategies, web-based learning

 

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