The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
For general enquiries email administrator@ejel.org
Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop

Information about the current European Conference on e-Learning is available here

For infomation on the International Conference on eLearning, click here

For infomation on the European Conference on Games Based Learning clickhere

 

Journal Article

Collaborative On‑Line Teaching: The Inevitable Path to Deep Learning and Knowledge Sharing?  pp43-50

Karin Tweddell Levinsen

© Feb 2006 Volume 4 Issue 1, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 111

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

It is often stressed that the pedagogic models and approaches of Collaborative Online Learning support a learner's shared knowledge building within collaborating groups of learners, the individual construction of knowledge and the formation of an ongoing learning Community of Practice. Based on a recent case study of a Danish Master's programme, this paper will demonstrate that the emerging collaborative practice displays tendencies contrary to the generally accepted assumptions. The outcome is not only based on the models and their attributes, it is also affected by the emerging practice itself and the interaction among the participants during a course. From this perspective, it is relevant to look at which possibilities and obstacles teachers encounter when they try to detect slowly emerging tendencies that may lead to major misinterpretations of the subject matter and marginalize or even exclude students from participating in the learning Community of Practice. In conclusion, the case study will identify the slowly emerging tendencies that may be detected and observed at an early stage and thus indicate areas in on‑line learning environments that require special attention.

 

Keywords: Collaborative on-line learning, Knowledge construction, Communities of practice, Emerging practice, Proaction, e-Learning

 

Share |

Journal Article

Developing the Communities of Practice, Framework for On‑Line Learning  pp133-140

Pam Moule

© Jan 2007 Volume 4 Issue 2, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp111 - 148

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Doctoral research considered whether healthcare students were able to develop characteristics of Communities of Practice when engaged in an interprofessional online module. Using a case study approach the research included two phases. Within phase one a questionnaire was administered to the group of 109 healthcare students. These were analysed to gain information on which to base sampling for the subsequent phase. Phase two employed three strands of data collection; five students completed an online diary, the online interaction of seven students was captured on a discussion board and three students were interviewed. Data were analysed using a form of pattern matching. The results suggested students were able to develop the essential elements of Communities of Practice. This was not uniformly seen however, and particular issues emerged for the online community. This paper focuses on discussing the contribution of the research to the development of the Communities of Practice framework for online learning. The discussion will review the main findings of the research, showing how these have led to the development of the theory. It offers an augmented framework, in which the elements of mutual engagement, joint enterprise and shared repertoire are enhanced to include those facets necessary to support an online learning community. Finally, it is suggested that the augmented framework may have applicability to other professional groups engaging in online learning and working, with consideration given to how it might support e‑based communities.

 

Keywords: Online learning, communities of practice, higher education, case study research

 

Share |

Journal Article

Developing Critically Thoughtful e‑Learning Communities of Practice  pp173-182

Philip L. Balcaen, Janine R. Hirtz

© Dec 2007 Volume 5 Issue 3, ICEL 2007, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp173 - 250

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

In this paper, we consider an approach to developing critically thoughtful e‑Learning communities of practice„where participants are deliberate about the use of specific intellectual tools supporting critical thinking. We address Garrison & Anderson's (2003) argument that such critical thinking should play a central role within the ecology of e‑ Learning communities and provide our view of what such communities might look like. To do this, we offer four categories of strategies helping to develop such communities„collaborative agreement on goals; facilitator(s) modelling and teaching the tools supporting critical thinking; and shaping communicative interactions within the e‑Learning environment to encourage thinking. We provide examples from a current study involving 36 kindergarten to grade 12 teachers' blended use of information and communication technologies (ICT) and face‑to‑face sessions to illustrate our view.

 

Keywords: critical thinking, communities of practice, tools for thought, e-Learning

 

Share |

Journal Article

Help! Active Student Learning and Error Remediation in an Online Calculus e‑Help Community  pp227-238

Carla van de Sande, Gaea Leinhardt

© Apr 2010 Volume 5 Issue 3, ICEL 2007, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp173 - 250

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Free, open, online homework help sites appear to be extremely popular and exist for many school subjects. Students can anonymously post problems at their convenience and receive responses from forum members. This mode of tutoring may be especially critical for school subjects such as calculus that are intrinsically challenging and have high attrition rates. However, educational research has focused on tutoring sessions that instruct students on a pre‑determined set of material or topics, and there has been no systematic research on these dynamic, free, open, online tutoring communities. In order to distinguish the student‑initiated e‑help episodes from traditional tutoring sessions, we refer to them as "tutorettes." Each tutorette was assigned a participation code that contained information on the number of contributions by each participant, the sequence of contributions, and the number of different participants. Student problem solving activity, defined by mathematical contributions and efforts, was measured for initial postings and for subsequent contributions. Finally, each tutorette was examined for evidence of mathematical errors and these were classified according to type: pre‑calculus, operational, and conceptual. A tutorette on the limit concept is provided to demonstrate how mathematical queries are resolved in an SOH e‑help community. Participation and problem solving attempts provided evidence of active student learning. Instead of simply using the tutors to do their homework, many students made initial attempts at solutions, queried tutor responses, and applied the help they received to make progress on solving problems. This behaviour appeared to be influenced by the actions of the tutor: Providing solution sketches accompanied by asking direct questions encouraged dialogue, whereas providing quasi‑complete worked solutions seemed to have the opposite effect. In contrast to classroom instruction, students in this e‑help community appeared comfortable in presenting incorrect work and tutors were open and forthright in their commentaries, evaluations, and explanations. In addition, tutors modulated their responses according to the type of error. Pre‑calculus errors and operational (calculus) errors were not accorded the same depth of explanation as conceptual misunderstandings.

 

Keywords: tutoring, e-help communities, discussion forums, calculus tutoring

 

Share |

Journal Article

The eLIDA CAMEL Nomadic Model of Collaborative Partnership for a Community of Practice in Design for Learning  pp197-206

Jill Jameson

© Nov 2008 Volume 6 Issue 3, Editor: Shirley Williams, Laura Czerniewicz, pp161 - 254

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

A nomadic collaborative partnership model for a community of practice (CoP) in Design for Learning (D4L) can facilitate successful innovation and continuing appraisals of effective professional practice, stimulated by a 'critical friend' assigned to the project. This paper reports on e‑learning case studies collected by the UK JISC eLIDA CAMEL Design for Learning project, which implemented and evaluated learning design (LD) tools in higher and further education as part of the 2006‑07 JISC Design for Learning pedagogic e‑learning programme. Project partners carried out user evaluations on innovative tools with a learning design function, collecting D4L case studies and LD sequences in post‑16HE contexts using LAMS and Moodle. The project brought together learning activity sequences from post‑16HE partners into a collaborative e‑learning community of professional practice based on the CAMEL (Collaborative Approaches to the Management of e‑Learning) model, contributing to international D4L developments. This paper briefly provides an overview of key project output contributions to e‑learning innovations, including results from teacher and student evaluations using online surveys. The paper explores intentionality in the development of a community of practice in design for learning, reporting on trials of learning design and social software that bridged some of the tensions between formalised intra‑institutional e‑learning relationships and inter‑institutional project team dynamic D4L practitioner development. Following a brief report of practitioner D4L e‑learning case studies and student feedback, the catalytic role of the 'critical friend' is highlighted and recommended as a key ingredient in the successful development of a nomadic model of communities of practice in the management of professional e‑learning projects. eLIDA CAMEL Partners included the Association of Learning Technology (ALT), JISC infoNet, three universities and five FESixth Form Colleges. Results reported to the UK JISC Experts' Pedagogy Group demonstrated e‑learning innovations by practitioners in D4L case studies, illuminated by the role of the 'critical friend', Professor Mark Stiles of Staffordshire University. The project also benefited from case study evaluations by Dr Liz Masterman of Oxford University Learning Technologies Group and the leading work of ALT and JISC infoNet in the development of the CAMEL model.

 

Keywords: e-learning, communities of practice, collaboration, design for learning, JISC, case study

 

Share |

Journal Article

Leadership in MMOGs: A Field of Research on Virtual Teams  pp223-234

Sofia Mysirlaki, Fotini Paraskeva

© Jul 2012 Volume 10 Issue 2, Special ECGBL Issue, Editor: Dimitris Gouscos, pp159 - 256

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

As our need for collaboration constantly grows, new tools have emerged to connect us in social networks, supporting the development of online communities, such as online games and virtual worlds. MMOGs (Massively Multiplayer Online Games) and MMORPGs ( Massively Multiplayer Online Role‑Playing Games) are complex systems, in which players are self‑organized and collaborate in guilds; constantly improve to remain competitive, visioning the enemys and guilds reaction. Nevertheless, these are considered to be important leadership skills for the real world, revealing multiple similarities that link the gaming world and the real world. However, despite the significant amount of educational research and the growing interest of the scientific community in MM OGs, there is a lack of empirical research considering the cognitive and social aspects of these games. This paper outlines the theoretical rationale behind a doctoral research project which is currently in progress and examines the leadership skills that can be developed in a self‑organized community of MMOGs. The main questions that this project attempts to address are: What characteristics related to the social nature of MMOGs activate leadership skills? What MMOGs can teach us about the design of succ essful online social spaces and activities for teaching leadership skills in virtual teams? In order to address these issues, this paper presents a theoretical framework for analyzing the social interactions in multiplayer games, within the context of com munity of practice, connectivism, self‑organization and activity theory. This framework aims at examining the creation of communities and the development of leadership skills in MMOGs, in order to explore the role of leadership in these virtual teams. The study of the social structures of a group and the leadership skills that can be developed in a MMOG should result to specific design principles that could be used as design methods for developing effective collaborative environments for virtual teams.

 

Keywords: MMOGs, MMORPGs, leadership, virtual teams, activity theory, connectivism, self-organization, communities of practice

 

Share |

Journal Article

Empowering Knowledge‑Building Pedagogy in Online Environments: Creating Digital Moments to Transform Practice:  pp128-137

Wendy Barber, Stacey Taylor, Sylvia Buchanan

© May 2014 Volume 12 Issue 2, ECEL, Editor: Mélanie Ciussi, pp126 - 226

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to examine a specific online pedagogical tool, Digital MomentsŽ that can be an effective strategy for building online communities in a knowledge building environment. While the paper will examine the specific techni ques and teaching methodologies that enabled the authors to create authentic online learning experiences in undergraduate and graduate courses, it also analyses how and why this strategy moves beyond simple constructivist thinking to the complexities of teaching in the digital world. Knowledge building in online environments requires students to take risks, try new digital tools, and find the modalities that work best to express the new knowledge they are creating. This pedagogical approach views studen ts as more than consumers of technology, but creators of new and innovative digital means of expressing concepts. Using both synchronous and asynchronous methodologies, the authors examined the highs and lows of translating meaningful face to face practic e to the online environment. The paper examines teaching strategies used in a six week online graduate course using Adobe connect, Blackboard LMS and synchronous weekly meetings. Through the use of unique strategies such as digital momentsŽ and embracing creative thought, an authentic, constructivist community was created. The authors journey to developing this authenticity, their online pedagogical style and an innovative, safe learning community has been chronicled using narrative qualitative inquiry in this paper. The writers use of digital moments empowers students to create and have ownership of their own online community. This paper articulates their journey into the abyss of digitizing themselves as teachers; it examines the specific techniques used for best practice in online learning, while simultaneously celebrating the splash of colour that is essential to brighten digital learning environments.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Online pedagogy, empowerment, knowledge-building communities, authentic practice

 

Share |

Journal Article

ENTEL: A Case Study on Knowledge Networks and the Impact of Web 2.0 Technologies  pp385-395

Paul Griffiths, Teresita Arenas

© Jul 2014 Volume 12 Issue 4, Editor: Dr Rikke Ørngreen and Dr Karin Tweddell Levinsen, pp313 - 410

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: This study re‑visits an organisation that defined its knowledge‑management strategy in 2008‑9 applying an established strategy‑intellectual capital alignment framework. It addresses questions How has knowledge management evolved at ENTEL, and w hat lessons can be learnt? Does the strategy‑knowledge management alignment framework applied at ENTEL in 2008‑9 still hold today?Ž The enquiry applies qualitative research in the form of a single case study, applying semi‑structured interviews and analy sing the evidence through coding at a phrase level. It arrives at some interesting findings, such as that leadership of communities of practice (COPs) is critical to their success, at least in the early stages of their implementation. Also that the inco rporation of generation Y (GY) into the workforce is changing the culture and openness to sharing knowledge, and thus accelerating the adoption of social networking (SN) tools, but the barriers to full deployment are still embedded in the older genera tion of senior and middle managers. Finally, it also emerges from the study that the paradigm by which organisations needed to choose between people‑driven and technology‑driven networks may no longer be valid: Due to changes in culture, to the need to sp eed up knowledge transfer, to the imperative for innovation and to the advent of low‑cost and low‑complexity SN technologies, organisations can make the most of both.

 

Keywords: Keywords: e-Learning, Web 2.0, Communities of Practice, Knowledge Management, Intellectual Capital

 

Share |