The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

Implementing International Virtual Elementary Classroom Activities for Public School Students in the U.S. and Korea  pp207-218

Eunhee Jung O'Neill

© Dec 2007 Volume 5 Issue 3, ICEL 2007, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp173 - 250

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Abstract

In today's global society, individuals with an understanding of different cultures that have the ability to apply this understanding to real world problem solving are more likely to become leaders. Preparing students for a global society is becoming a significant part of education. While many international online exchange projects have been conducted at schools to help expose students to the world and experience international collaborations, few studies have focused on both developing intercultural competence for elementary school students and discovering practical ways of implementing a cross‑cultural exchange program into the public elementary school systems as well. This study, International Virtual Elementary Classroom Activities (IVECA), planned to explore how American and Korean students can develop culturally meaningful interactions through asynchronous online communications in a content management system (CMS), Blackboard; and investigate the factors or strategies useful for integrating IVECA into public school curricula. Data were collected using observation and interview methods, and also included reviewing students' journals. The data analysis involved interpretive analytic induction. Findings indicated that IVECA (a) promotes students' intercultural competence; (b) developed their social interaction skills both in the regular classrooms and the virtual classroom; (c) facilitated diverse students' motivations for learning at school; (d) enhanced writing and reading skills; and (e) engaged learning disabled students in the classroom activities. Additional findings from this study indicate that (a) a systematic support system for teachers' technology use and instructional design is necessary, and (b) school administrators' positive perception toward cross‑cultural exchange activities and their coherent connections between state learning standards and IVECA objectives are important. Further considerations are addressed and the different influences of IVECA on the U.S. students and Korean students and its implementation, which takes into consideration such influences, will also be discussed.

 

Keywords: international virtual elementary classroom exchanges, intercultural competence, cultural awareness, online content management system, technology integration strategies, instructional technology support system

 

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Journal Article

Web 2.0‑Mediated Competence — Implicit Educational Demands on Learners  pp111-118

Nina Bonderup Dohn

© Jun 2009 Volume 7 Issue 2, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp85 - 190

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Abstract

The employment of Web 2.0 within higher educational settings has become increasingly popular. Reasons for doing so include student motivation, didactic considerations of facilitating individual and collaborative knowledge construction, and the support Web 2.0 gives the learner in transgressing and resituating content and practices between the formal and informal learning settings in which she participates. However, introducing Web 2.0‑practices into educational settings leads to tensions and challenges in practice because of conceptual tensions between the views of knowledge and learning inherent in Web 2.0‑practices and in the educational system: Implicit in Web 2.0‑practices is a conception of 'knowledge' as, on the one side, process and activity, i.e. as use, evaluation, transformation and reuse of material, and, on the other, the product side, as a distributed attribute of a whole system (such as Wikipedia) or community of practice (such as the community of practice of Wikipedia contributors). In contrast, 'knowledge' within the educational system is traditionally viewed as a state possessed by the individual, and learning as the acquisition of this state. This paper is an analysis of the challenges which these tensions lead to for the learners. The argument is that Web 2.0‑mediated learning activities within an educational setting place implicit competence demands on the students, along with the more explicit ones of reflexivity, participation and knowledge construction. These demands are to some extent in conflict with each other as well as with the more explicit ones. A simple example of such conflicting competence demands is experienced when students develop a course wiki: The Web 2.0‑competence demands here concern the doing something with the material. The copy‑pasting of e.g. a Wikipedia‑article without referencing it from this point of view is a legitimate contribution to the knowledge building of the course wiki. In contrast, educational competence demands require the student to participate actively in the formulation of the course wiki‑articles. Copy‑pasting without reference from this point of view is cheating. Here, the student is met with the incoherent requirement of authoring entries that display the acquisition of a knowledge state in a context where authorship is renounced and knowledge is understood dynamically and distributively. More generally, in Web 2.0‑mediated educational learning activities, the student is required to manoeuvre in a field of interacting, yet conflicting, demands, and the assessment of hisher competence stands the risk of being more of an evaluation of the skill to so manoeuvre than of skills and knowledge explicitly pursued in the course.

 

Keywords: Web 2.0 in education, wikis, second life, competence, concepts of knowledge, concepts of learning

 

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Journal Article

The Global Classroom Model Simultaneous campus‑ and home‑based education using videoconferencing  pp215-226

Charlotte Lærke Weitze, Rikke Ørngreen

© May 2014 Volume 12 Issue 2, ECEL, Editor: Mélanie Ciussi, pp126 - 226

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Abstract

Abstract: This paper presents and discusses findings about how students, teachers, and the organization experience a start‑up‑project applying videoconferences between campus and home. This is new territory for adult learning centers. The research is base d on the Global Classroom Model as it is implemented and used at an adult learning center in Denmark, named VUC Storstrøm. . After a couple of years of campus‑to‑campus video streaming, VUC Storstrøm started a fulltime day program in 2011 with the support of a hybrid campus and videoconference model. In this model the teachers and some of the students are present on campus in the classroom, while other students are participating simultaneously from their home using laptops. In this paper, the case and con text of VUC Storstrøm, the research design chosen, and the literature that already exists in this area constitutes the backdrop for the analysis and discussion of the first activities in this long‑term project. The research is based on interviews, on utte rances in feedback sessions, and on the observed interaction taking place in the first sixths month of 2013 (i.e. 1½ year after the first program commenced). Evaluations show that the students are happy with the flexibility this model provides in their everyday life. However, findings also show several obstacles: Technical issues are at play, but also the learning design of the lessons, as well as general organizational and cultural issues. In this paper we focus on the students and teachers experiences and on the organizational issues related to the transition to the Global Classroom Model as well as provide outlines to the consequences these findings may have, for example in relation to the continued development of the teachers educational designs.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Global Classroom, videoconferences, hybrid campus- and home-based education, adult education, competence development, teacher education

 

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Journal Article

Does the Web Contain Pedagogically Informed Materials? The COSREW Outcomes  pp390-411

Athitaya Nitchot, Lester Gilbert

© Oct 2015 Volume 13 Issue 5, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Karin Levinsen, pp317 - 445

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Abstract

Abstract: Web resources allow a learner to have more opportunities for study at any time and any place. It is still difficult, however, for learners to choose the right study materials to match their desired learning. A competence‑based system for recomme nding study materials from the Web (COSREW) is proposed, based on the learners competences. COSREWgenerates a list of learning paths, and extracts search terms from the competence statements on the chosen learning path. Three experiments were conducted to evaluate COSREWs recommendations. The first explored the differences between search engines and the qualities of the study material links in helping learners achieve their competences. The second experiment explored the differences between search key words, and the third experiment comparedCOSREW with freely‑browsing learning modes. The results showed that the Web is currently not a good resource for a pedagogically informed competence‑based system, since Web pages predominantly comprise text‑based su bject matter content with little support for learning competence or capability.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Competency Model, Competence Structure, Web-based Learning, Internet Supported Learning, Pedagogy, Self-learning

 

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Journal Article

Iphras as an E‑Learning Platform for Idiomatic Competence  pp137-143

Teodora Kiryakova-Dineva, Milena Levunlieva, Vyara Kyurova

© May 2017 Volume 15 Issue 2, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Karin Levinsen, pp105 - 198

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Abstract

The integration of E‑learning has expanded in a variety of directions to a degree that its successful application is of great importance to all sectors of education and training. E‑learning can offer unquestionable advantages to everyone involved in both the assessment and the knowledge transfer process (Owens and Floyd 2007; Luchoomun, McLuckie and van Wesel 2010; Damyanov and Tsankov 2016). Some of the challenges of e‑learning methods rest in choosing the right platform, and in determining the scope of the selected material as well as the adequacy of its user friendly methodology. Among the features of e‑learning platforms that are applicable to a wider audience is the criterion of multi‑language application. As regards E‑learning in foreign language education, there are three pragmatic and cultural aspects which are often omitted from the e‑learning system: 1) the transfer of idiomatic competence; 2) the acquisition of cultural concepts; and 3) the inclusion of small and endangered languages. This is not the case with the elaboration of the e‑learning platform IPHRAS ‑ Interphraseologie für Studien‑und Berufsmobile. The proposed paper presents its main achievements and focuses on the methodology for foreign language learning in a multilingual electronic environment. The process is facilitated by the incorporation of thematically structured multiword units (idioms and collocations). Its priority is easy access to a variety of languages, including Greek, Turkish, Romanian, Bulgarian, through more popular languages such as English and German. The degree of translation equivalence of its elements facilitates not only multilingualism, but also the initial phase of mastering the vocabulary of additional languages. The IPHRAS platform was elaborated by an international team of Balkan researchers and language instructors and funded by the European Commission within the Lifelong learning program.

 

Keywords: e-learning platform, foreign languages, multilingualism, idiomatic competence

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 15 Issue 2 / May 2017  pp105‑198

Editor: Rikke Ørngreen, Karin Levinsen

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Keywords: active learning, higher education, student learning, student engagement, online course design and development, interdisciplinary collaboration, frustrations, TESL students’ perceptions, hypermedia reading materials, reading comprehension, virtual containers, STEAM, Open Educational Resources, content distribution platforms, e-learning platform, foreign languages, multilingualism, idiomatic competence, e-learning; global health education; connectivity; bandwidth management; capacity building; educational technologies, Clicker technology, Facebook, and Wiley Plus, Web-based homework, behavioral intention, cognitive load, germane load, e-learning, instructional design, MOOC, online community, Computer Mediated Communication (CMC), Communities of Practice (CoPs), nonverbal communication

 

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