The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
For publication in December 2016: Special issue on Research Methodologies in e-Learning. See the Call for Papers for further details
Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop

Information about the current European Conference on e-Learning is available here

For infomation on the International Conference on eLearning, click here

For infomation on the European Conference on Games Based Learning clickhere

 

Journal Article

Understanding and reducing stress in collaborative e‑learning  pp114-121

Naomi Lawless, John Allan

© Jan 2004 Volume 2 Issue 1, Special Issue for ECEL 2003, Editor: Roy Williams, pp1 - 239

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

 

Keywords: On-line collaboration, stress, online learning, group roles, group cohesion, culture, reducing stress, barriers to online working, e-teams, e-learning, cyber-stress, techno-stress, virtual teams

 

Share |

Journal Article

Empirical Data and Emerging Power Critiques: Lessons Learned  pp312-321

Caroline Stockman

© Dec 2016 Volume 14 Issue 5, Editor: Robert Ramberg, pp291 - 349

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: This paper evidences the importance of maintaining a dynamic interpretive stance in e‑learning research. In particular, it shows how a rigorous methodology, tailored to the research question, overlooked the importance of power and knowledge in technology acceptance research for education. It was perhaps the affordance of the mixed methods design, explained in this paper, which allowed for a blind spot to come to the surface, and prompt a renegotiation of the data. Empirical studies on the use of technology in education don’t always take the pervasiveness of power dynamics into account. Yet this study shows how direct and effective they are in a teacher’s decision to use or not use a technology. Using Michel Foucault’s theory as an analytical tool, the findings from an original empirical study are re‑examined. The analysis offers a new understanding of the critical manifestations of a performance culture in UK schooling, which goes hand in hand with a culture of observation and accountability. This is further underlined by the authority of time pressures. Both of these go at the cost of pedagogical considerations, which is arguably the primary concern of educators. That is where a power critique shows it value, but also its necessity. It traces the breaking points of the system; the moment where it undermines the rationality which it uses as its own justification. We correctly motivate our research choices through methodological paradigms and domain loyalties, but including a power critique suggests a new imperative for e‑learning research. It offers the possibility to question normalised forces and better understand technology acceptance in education. We need to consider this critical position in any research design to continue challenging our theorising about e‑learning.

 

Keywords: Keywords: technology acceptance, power, culture, Foucault, Ofsted.

 

Share |

Journal Article

Online Students: Relationships between Participation, Demographics and Academic Performance  pp19-28

J. Coldwell, A. Craig, T. Paterson, J. Mustard

© Mar 2008 Volume 6 Issue 1, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 75

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Using information technology to support teaching and learning is becoming ubiquitous in tertiary education. However, how students participate and perform when a major component of the learning experience is conducted via an online learning environment is still an open question. The objective of this study was to investigate any relationships between the participation, demographics and academic performance of students in an information technology course that was taught wholly online. Through a detailed analysis of tracking data of student participation, which was automatically collected by the online learning environment, it was found that a relationship existed between students' participation in the online learning environment and their performance, as measured by final results in the course. Relationships also existed between gender, nationality, participation and performance. However, there was no relationship between age and performance and participation. These findings suggest that when designing online learning for a diverse population, student demographics should be taken into account to maximise the benefits of the learning experience.

 

Keywords: culture, diversity, online learning, participation

 

Share |

Journal Article

The VLE as a Trojan Mouse: Policy, Politics and Pragmatism  pp63-72

Mark Brown, Shelley Paewai, Gordon Suddaby

© Mar 2010 Volume 8 Issue 2, ECEL 2009, Editor: Shirley Williams, Florin Salajan, pp51 - 208

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

This paper argues that selecting a new Learning Management System (LMS) is a strategic decision about the future direction of your institution. However, the development of a robust methodology for the selection of a new LMS is particularly challenging given the fluidity of the elearning environment. This is especially so when both quantitative and qualitative factors are overlaid by institutional requirements involving political considerations. Selecting the technology is only part of the process and the least problematic aspect. The real challenges are embedded in institutional culture. The paper reflects on the tactics, strategies and approval process involved in the decision to adopt Moodle to replace a proprietary system for the delivery of learning in New Zealand's largest university‑level distance education provider. Critical to the process was the explication of guiding principles, pedagogical criteria and identification of institutional requirements, along with politically astute alliances and allegiances to inform and endorse the selection process. Those centrally involved in the decision process draw on their experiences and reflect on the type of questions that senior managers need to ask when considering new strategic initiatives in open and distance learning.

 

Keywords: Moodle, learning management system, policy, leadership, institutional culture

 

Share |

Journal Article

Becoming Chemists through Game‑based Inquiry Learning: The Case of Legends of Alkhimia  pp185-198

Yam San Chee, Kim Chwee Daniel Tan

© Jul 2012 Volume 10 Issue 2, Special ECGBL Issue, Editor: Dimitris Gouscos, pp159 - 256

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Traditional modes of chemistry education in schools focus on imparting chemistry knowledge to students via instruction. Consequently, students often acquire the mistaken understanding that scientific knowledge comprises a fixed body of provenŽ facts. The y fail to comprehend that the construction of scientific understanding is a human and social endeavor. Consequently, there can be alternative and conflicting views and theories. To provide students access to an enhanced learning curriculum, Legends of Alk himia was designed and developed as an educational game for 13 to 14‑year‑olds to foster the learning of chemistry through inquiry. The multiplayer game supports four concurrent players. It is played on personal computers connected via a local area networ k. The game embeds students in problem solving challenges related to the use of chemistry in realistic contexts. In attempting to solve these problems, students must engage in individual laboratory work using an in‑game virtual chemistry lab. The game lev els take students through a narrative arc that provides coherence to the entire gameplay experience. Legends of Alkhimia, together with its associated curricular materials, instantiates classroom learning based on performance pedagogy: a pedagogy that con structs learning through the lens of performance theory. Leveraging the immersive affordances of 3D game environments, the learning experience is designed to engage students in the dialectic interplay between learning in the first person, based on playing the game, and learning in the third person, based on the Bakhtinian notion of dialog. The learning process follows a developmental trajectory of becoming a chemist. Enacting performance pedagogy in the classroom requires a shift in traditional classroom culture toward that of a professional practice community. We report on an empirical study of a game‑based learning classroom intervention where students in the Alkhimia learning program participated in an 8‑week curriculum sequence involving six levels of game play. We compared pre‑ and posttest survey responses from a class of 40 students who learned chemistry using the Alkhimia curriculum. We also compared learning outcomes of students in the said intervention class with a control class of 38 students w ho learned chemistry through traditional classroom instruction. All students in our study were 13‑year‑olds from a typical government secondary school. We noted significant shifts in intervention students perceptions of their identity, their epistemologi cal beliefs, their dispositions toward science inquiry, and of classroom culture. Students understanding of chemistry was evaluated through a common assessment that comprised a complex separation task involving mixtures, solutes, and immiscible liquids. Two evaluation criteria were used: (1) effectiveness of separation, and (2) demonstration of conceptual understanding of chemistry. We found that the Alkhimia students significantly outperformed the control students when assessed on the extent to whic h effective separation was achieved in the students proposed solution (t75 = 2.56, p = .026) and when assessed with respect to conceptual understanding of chemistry in the separation task (t75 = 3.41, p = .002). We discuss, from a theoretical perspec tive, how and why learning with the Alkhimia curriculum is efficacious. Our findings are significant in that they suggest how inquiry learning can be successfully enacted in a chemistry game‑based learning curriculum, and they underscore the efficacy of a pproaching game‑based learning in terms of performance.

 

Keywords: performance, play, dialog, inquiry, chemistry, identity, epistemological beliefs, classroom culture

 

Share |

Journal Issue

Volume 6 Issue 1 / Mar 2008  pp1‑75

Editor: Shirley Williams

View Contents Download PDF (free)

Editorial

A new issue of EJEL brings seven interesting pieces of research from different countries around the world. The learners involved in these researches range from school children to mature postgraduate students; they are of a variety of nationalities, they have differing previous experience and are of both genders. The learners have different modes of working; on‑campus or at a distance, and the educators have a variety of approaches and strategies to meet the difficulties their learners face. Reading these papers gives an insight to the challenges that the e‑Learning community faces. Overwhelmingly I am left with the view that there is no one‑size‑fits‑all in e‑Learning; we must be prepared to consider the individual if e‑Learning is to succeed.

 

Keywords: Asynchronous, community participation, construction technique, culture, curriculum development, distance learning, diversity, e-learning, engagement, evaluation, flexible learning, Greece, higher education, ICT, information and communication technology, instructional design, instructivism, international, LMS, Marginalized, online courses, online evaluation, online learning, participation, pedagogical development., postgraduate studies, quality assessment, secondary, socio-constructivism, study guide, test, time-management, virtual classroom, widening participation

 

Share |

Journal Issue

Volume 6 Issue 2 / Apr 2008  pp99‑182

Editor: Shirley Williams

View Contents Download PDF (free)

Keywords: Asynchronous, community participation, construction technique, culture, curriculum development, distance learning, diversity, e-learning, engagement, evaluation, flexible learning, Greece, higher education, ICT, information and communication technology, instructional design, instructivism, international, LMS, Marginalized, online courses, online evaluation, online learning, participation, pedagogical development., postgraduate studies, quality assessment, secondary, socio-constructivism, study guide, test, time-management, virtual classroom, widening participation

 

Share |

Journal Issue

Volume 10 Issue 2, Special ECGBL Issue / Jul 2012  pp159‑256

Editor: Dimitris Gouscos

View Contents Download PDF (free)

Keywords: activity theory, alternative approaches, budget constraints, chemistry, classroom culture, collaboration, communities of practice, complex systems, connectivism, constructionist and inquiry-based learning, context, dialog, digital educational games, digital games, emotion, epistemological beliefs, formal learning, game development, game experience, game-based learning, games, half-baked microworlds, identity, inquiry, leadership, MMOGs, MMORPGs, modelling, motivation, non-invasive assessment, pedagogical issues, performance, play, problem representation, self-organization, serious games, situated play, sustainability, teacher’s role, theory, virtual teams,

 

Share |