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Journal Article

Differences in Intention to Use Educational RSS Feeds Between Lebanese and British Students: A Multi‑Group Analysis Based on the Technology Acceptance Model  pp14-29

Dr. Ali Tarhini, Dr. Michael James Scott, Dr. Sujeet Kumar Sharma, Dr. Muhammad Sharif Abbasi

© Jan 2015 Volume 13 Issue 1, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Karin Levinsen, pp1 - 56

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Abstract

Abstract: Really Simple Syndication (RSS) offers a means for university students to receive timely updates from virtual learning environments. However, despite its utility, only 21% of home students surveyed at a university in Lebanon claim to have ever used the technology. To investigate whether national culture could be an influence on intention to use RSS, the survey was extended to British students in the UK. Using the Technology Adoption Model (TAM) as a research framework, 437 students responded to a questionnaire containing four constructs: behavioural intention to use; attitude towards benefit; perceived usefulness; and perceived ease of use. Principle components analysis and structural equation modelling were used to explore the psychometric qualities and utility of TAM in both contexts. The results show that adoption was significantly higher, but also modest, in the British context at 36%. Configural and metric invariance were fully supported, while scalar and factorial invariance were parti ally supported. Further analysis shows significant differences between perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use across the two contexts studied. Therefore, it is recommended that faculty demonstrate to students how educational RSS feeds can be used effectively to increase awareness and emphasise usefulness in both contexts.

 

Keywords: Keywords: cross-cultural, technology adoption model, developing countries, RSS, virtual learning environments, engagement

 

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Journal Article

Towards the Acceptance of RSS to Support Learning: An empirical study to validate the Technology Acceptance Model in Lebanon  pp30-41

Dr. Ali Tarhini, Dr. Mohammad Hassouna, Dr. Muhammad Sharif Abbasi, Dr. Jorge Orozco

© Jan 2015 Volume 13 Issue 1, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Karin Levinsen, pp1 - 56

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Abstract

Abstract: Simpler is better. There are a lot of needsŽ in e‑Learning, and theres often a limit to the time, talent, and money that can be thrown at them individually. Contemporary pedagogy in technology and engineering disciplines, within the higher edu cation context, champion instructional designs that emphasize peer instruction and rich formative feedback. However, it can be challenging to maintain student engagement outside the traditional classroom environment and ensure that students receive feedba ck in time to help them with ongoing assignments. The use of virtual learning platforms, such as Blackboard Learn, and web feed syndication, using technology such as Rich Site Summaries (RSS), can help overcome such challenges. However, during an initia l pilot at an institution in Lebanon, only 21% of students reported making use of both these facilities. In this study, the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) was used to guide the development of a scale to be used to investigate antecedents to the use o f web feeds. The proposed scale was reviewed by 4 experts and piloted with 235 students. The collected data were analysed using structural equation modeling (SEM) technique based on AMOS methods. The results revealed adequate face, content, and construc t validity. However, perceived ease of use was not a significant predictor of attitude towards use. Overall, the proposed model achieves acceptable fit and explains for 38% of its variance of which is lower than that of the original TAM. This suggests tha t aspects of the model may lack criterion validity in the Lebanese context. Consequently, it may be necessary to extend the scale by capturing additional moderators and predictors, such as cultural values and subjective norms. We concluded that the existe nce of RSS feeds in education improves significantly the content presented by the instructors to the e‑learning user decreasing at the same time the size and access cost.

 

Keywords: keywords: really simple syndication, rss feeds, technology acceptance model, technology adoption, e-learning, structural equation modeling, developing countries, lebanon

 

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Journal Article

E‑Learning Sudan, Formal Learning for Out‑of‑School Children  pp136-149

Hester Stubbé, Aiman Badri, Rebecca Telford, Anja van der Hulst, Wouter van Joolingen

© May 2016 Volume 14 Issue 2, ECGBL 2015, Editor: Robin Munkvold, pp81 - 149

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Abstract

Abstract: E‑Learning Sudan (ELS) is a custom‑built computer/tablet game that provides alternative learning opportunities to Sudanese children who are excluded from education. Unique in ELS is that children can learn mathematics, in their own remote vill age, without a teacher. This research study assessed the effectiveness of ELS in two pilots through a pretest…posttest control group quasi‑experimental design. In Pilot I, 67 children in three remote villages, aged used the game for a period of six weeks, five days a week, 45 minutes a day; the control group did not receive any education.. In Pilot II, 591 children in 19 remote villages, played the game for six months, for a maximum of five times a week, 45 minutes a day; the control group received inform al education in out‑of‑school centers. The results of the analysis on the pretest…posttest data revealed that ELS increased mathematics knowledge acquisition in numeracy and adding significantly and maintained student motivation to learn. Analyses of cont rol group data and EGMA (internationally validates Early Grade Mathematics Assessment) showed that the children in the experimental group learned more than children who received no education at all, informal or formal education. These findings suggest t hat the implementation of ELS can greatly benefit learning for out‑of‑school children like in Sudan.

 

Keywords: Keywords: game-based learning, autonomous learning, primary education, mathematics, developing countries, evaluation

 

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