The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

“What my Guidance Councillor Should Have Told me”: The Importance of Universal Access and Exposure to Executive‑Level Advice  pp239-252

Catherine Elliott, Joanne Leck, Brittany Rockwell, Michael Luthy

© Aug 2013 Volume 11 Issue 3, ECEL 2012, Editor: Hans Beldhuis and Koos Winnips, pp168 - 272

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Abstract

Abstract: Often, knowledge and quality education is reserved for the elite, where there are systemic obstacles to gaining access to today’s leaders. Gender and racial inequities in executive‑level positions across North America have been a long‑standing debate amongst scholars and policy makers. Research has consistently documented that women are disproportionately represented in upper management and in positions of power and still continue to dominate traditionally “female” occupations, such as administrative support and service workers. Though gender inequalities are evidently present, there is also a clear under‑representation of visible minorities holding executive‑level positions as well. In order to reverse these trends, governments across North‑America have enforced employment equity legislation and many organizations have voluntarily committed to similar initiatives. Perceived educational and career‑related barriers to opportunity, choice, and information within these segregated groups are shaped early on. For this reason, many researchers champion early interventional programs in order to prevent such perceived barriers from developing. In this paper, there will be a discussion of social networks and how certain groups are denied access to sources of social capital, thus hindering their ability to seek out prospective jobs or entering certain career streams. In this study, Women in the Lead, a database published in 2009, is a national directory of women whose professional expertise and experience recommend them as candidates for positions of senior level responsibility and as members on corporate boards. The Women in the Lead database was comprised entirely of professional women who had voluntarily subscribed as members. Of the 630 women asked to participate, 210 responded to the survey. The 210 women who responded were from 14 different industries in Canada and the United States. The next generation was described as soon to be graduates of high school. A summary of this advice is reported in this paper, with the objective of providing guidance to the next generation looking to enter the workforce, regardless of their gender, location, and race. We also explore the potential of the internet in levelling these barriers and opening up new possibilities for e‑mentoring youth and building social capital.

 

Keywords: Keywords: social capital, gender, visible minorities, leadership, career planning, management, e-mentoring

 

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Journal Article

Learner Differences in Perceived Satisfaction of an Online Learning: an Extension to the Technology Acceptance Model in an Arabic Sample  pp412-430

Ahmed Al-Azawei, Karsten Lundqvist

© Oct 2015 Volume 13 Issue 5, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Karin Levinsen, pp317 - 445

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Abstract

Abstract: Online learning constitutes the most popular distance‑learning method, with flexibility, accessibility, visibility, manageability and availability as its core features. However, current research indicates that its efficacy is not consistent acro ss all learners. This study aimed to modify and extend the factors of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to examine perceived satisfaction of an Arabic sample in online learning. The integrated factors in the modified model includes: deep level (lea rning styles), surface level (gender), and cognitive (online self‑efficacy) factors. Learning styles were chosen as a central factor. Hence, the online course was purposefully developed to support one pole in each dimension of Felder and Silverman Le arning Styles Model (FSLSM) in order to reveal the pedagogical implications of learning styles on learner satisfaction. A total of 70 learners participated voluntarily in the research. At the end of the online course, they were requested to fill in two questionnaires: the Index of Learning Styles (ILS) and a standard questionnaire. The psychometric properties of the latter were firstly analysed to validate the instrument. Then, Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modelling (PLS‑SEM) was conduc ted to examine the proposed hypotheses. The model achieves an acceptable fit and explains 44.8% of variance. Perceived usefulness represented the best predictor, whereas online self‑efficacy and perceived ease of use failed to show a direct impact on perc eived satisfaction. Furthermore, neither learning styles nor gender diversity had direct influence on the dependent factors. Accordingly, the research suggested that other variables may have to be integrated to enhance the power of the model.

 

Keywords: Keywords: online learning, learning styles, gender diversity, online self-efficacy, learner satisfaction, Technology Acceptance Model, TAM

 

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Journal Article

Gender and Cultural Differences in Game‑Based Learning Experiences  pp310-319

Heide Lukosch, Shalini Kurapati, Daan Groen, Alexander Verbraeck

© Aug 2017 Volume 15 Issue 4, Editor: Elizabeth Boyle and Thomas Connolly, pp281 - 366

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Abstract

Games have been successfully used in educational settings for many years. Still, it is not known in detail which factors influence the use and effectiveness of educational games. The game environment, its technology, and other game mechanics are factors directly linked to the game itself. The player’s experience with the subject of the game and/or games in general, his or her motivation and expectations towards the gaming experience influence the outcome of a game‑based learning experience. Some of the personal aspects, like age, were already addressed in earlier research. Cultural and gender differences though, were not a main object of study in educational gaming so far. This study started from certain assumptions about differences in game play, related to players’ cultural backgrounds and gender. Literature suggests that gender plays a role when it comes to game performance. This paper introduces outcomes of a study with a so‑called Microgame, a brief game used to raise the awareness of interdependent planning operations. It shows that in this game, gender and culture make a difference in relation to the learning experience of the players, measured by game performance.

 

Keywords: Microgames, learning, gender, culture

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 15 Issue 4 / Aug 2017  pp281‑366

Editor: Elizabeth Boyle, Thomas Connolly

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Editorial

 

Keywords: Sign Language; American Sign Language; Recognition System; Kinect; Expert System; Game-Based Learning; Knowledge Engineering, Visual programming, Education, Computational thinking, K-12, Lightbot, Scratch, Microgames, learning, gender, culture, Multiple intelligences; Game preferences; Game mechanics; Evidence-based; Game design; Learning games, Collaboration, problem solving, online assessment, log stream data, measurement, e-learning, Educational Video Games; TAM (Technology Acceptance Model); Higher Education; Behavioural intention; Age

 

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