The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

Implementing International Virtual Elementary Classroom Activities for Public School Students in the U.S. and Korea  pp207-218

Eunhee Jung O'Neill

© Dec 2007 Volume 5 Issue 3, ICEL 2007, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp173 - 250

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Abstract

In today's global society, individuals with an understanding of different cultures that have the ability to apply this understanding to real world problem solving are more likely to become leaders. Preparing students for a global society is becoming a significant part of education. While many international online exchange projects have been conducted at schools to help expose students to the world and experience international collaborations, few studies have focused on both developing intercultural competence for elementary school students and discovering practical ways of implementing a cross‑cultural exchange program into the public elementary school systems as well. This study, International Virtual Elementary Classroom Activities (IVECA), planned to explore how American and Korean students can develop culturally meaningful interactions through asynchronous online communications in a content management system (CMS), Blackboard; and investigate the factors or strategies useful for integrating IVECA into public school curricula. Data were collected using observation and interview methods, and also included reviewing students' journals. The data analysis involved interpretive analytic induction. Findings indicated that IVECA (a) promotes students' intercultural competence; (b) developed their social interaction skills both in the regular classrooms and the virtual classroom; (c) facilitated diverse students' motivations for learning at school; (d) enhanced writing and reading skills; and (e) engaged learning disabled students in the classroom activities. Additional findings from this study indicate that (a) a systematic support system for teachers' technology use and instructional design is necessary, and (b) school administrators' positive perception toward cross‑cultural exchange activities and their coherent connections between state learning standards and IVECA objectives are important. Further considerations are addressed and the different influences of IVECA on the U.S. students and Korean students and its implementation, which takes into consideration such influences, will also be discussed.

 

Keywords: international virtual elementary classroom exchanges, intercultural competence, cultural awareness, online content management system, technology integration strategies, instructional technology support system

 

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Journal Article

Integrating eLearning to Support Medical Education at the New University of Botswana School of Medicine  pp43-51

Masego B. Kebaetse, Oathokwa Nkomazana, Cecil Haverkamp

© Feb 2014 Volume 12 Issue 1, ICEL2013, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 125

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Abstract

Abstract: Since the enrolment of its first cohort of students in 2009, the University of Botswana School of Medicine (UB SoM) has employed elearning as a key element to support and strengthen its model of decentralised medical education. Significant inv estments have been made in setting up the physical infrastructure, and in acquiring relevant expertise to develop and implement an elearning agenda in a context with practical challenges associated with medical education in decentralised setup. Following the enrolment of its first cohorts of medical students, and residents in Paediatrics and Internal Medicine between 2009 and 2010, the School also launched a Family Medicine training programme in 2011 at two rural sites. With the expectation of contributin g to a positive teaching and learning environment for faculty, residents, and medical students in these remote areas, elearning is also seen as important for their retention, and thus for improved access to quality health care in rural Botswana. In this p aper, the authors critically reflect on the strategies used to implement elearning at UB SoM over the past 18 months, and highlight challenges experienced while implementing elearning in a new medical school situated within an older university context. St rong relationships with partners were identified as a critical foundation for the long‑term sustainability beyond the initial procurement and installation infrastructure. While confirming the obvious technical challenges in a setting like Botswana, the au thors emphasise the need not to underestimate associated broader challenges in engaging a diverse range of users, partners and stakeholders; not to lose sight of the pedagogical goals that are meant to drive the choice and use of technology (rather than vice versa); and to ensure that the expected benefits of the technology can and will be shared and sustained by a range of partners in the long run.

 

Keywords: Keywords: elearning, medical education, technology integration, mlearning, mhealth, tablets, ICT, sustainability

 

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Journal Article

The Forms and Functions of Teaching and Learning Innovations on Blackboard; Substantial or Superficial?  pp257-265

Vuyisile Nkonki, Siyanda Ntlabathi

© Nov 2016 Volume 14 Issue 4, Editor: Guest Editors, Rozhan M. Idrus and Nurkhamimi Zainuddin, pp233 - 290

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Abstract

This study is an Information and Computer Technology evaluation of the Blackboard Learning Management System into teaching and learning at an institution of higher education in South Africa. In view of the institution’s objective of developing a context‑driven, transformative, and innovative teaching and learning practices involving the integration of technology, the study sought to classify and evaluate the form and function of teaching and learning innovations on Blackboard. Using a case study research design and a purposive sampling strategy, lecturers making an extensive use of Blackboard in the delivery of their courses were sampled. Blackboard start‑up documents as well as open‑ended questionnaires for lecturers provided qualitative data. Content analysis and the extraction of themes were employed. The functional pedagogical framework and SAMR models were used as interpretive lenses for the findings. The study concludes that the nature of Blackboard innovations tended to be more superficial at the levels of substitution and augmentation. Limited transformation evidenced by modification and redefinition spelled lack of substantial changes in curriculum design and delivery. With respect to the functions served by Blackboard, the conclusion drawn is that the integration is to a large extent driven by management and efficiency concerns and less by interaction, collaboration and personalisation functions. The study signals non‑realisation of the educational functions spelt in the Blackboard start‑up documents. The study recommends a differentiated approach to Blackboard training by a multi‑disciplinary team.

 

Keywords: ICT integration, innovation, transformation, Blackboard, Learning Management Systems, transformational learning, pedagogical innovations

 

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Journal Article

Technology‑Capable Teachers Transitioning to Technology‑Challenged Schools  pp269-280

Faiza Derbel

© Jun 2017 Volume 15 Issue 3, Editor: Jarmila Novotná and Antonín Jančařík, pp199 - 280

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Abstract

Developing countries lacking capabilities, funds and human resources are compelled to improve the digital literacy rates of their task force through educational initiatives. This is the case of Tunisia where a stand‑alone in‑service teacher education (Ted) initiative was implemented in 2014 and 2015. The aim of this project, the Tech Age Teacher Project (TATP), was to equip teachers in Tunisia with the technology skills for teaching so that they can dispense teaching of a 21st‑century education quality. Five English language teachers, who benefitted from this initiative, are the focus of this study. The aim was to explore whether and how they are making the transition into the technologically‑challenged schools. Analysis of the TATP documents, data is collected through a short teacher questionnaire and a semi‑structured interview during which teachers give their personal accounts as TAT trainees and their attempts to apply the ideas in real school settings. Results indicated that teachers showed great dedication toward implementing the ideas/skills received in the training and that they strove, as technology‑capable teachers, to integrate technology in their day‑to‑day practice despite the constraints they faced in the schools. Their accounts reveal their rationale and motives for using technology with their students and the strategies they employ to circumvent obstacles, but also show that their success in integrating technology remains restricted by issues of infrastructure, barred access to a technology space, learners' "playful" attitudes, etc. The findings highlight these teachers' resourcefulness and sense of mission as to transforming their learners' learning experience and changing their attitudes towards technology use and to fostering 21st‑century education learning goals. The paper concludes with recommendations for future initiatives to (re)design and (re)orient the goals of the initiative towards supporting these teachers' learning processes as they make the transition as technology‑capable teachers into the technology‑challenged schools. Recommendations are made for the emerging professional community of technology‑capable teachers to build a networked community of practice likely to foster these teachers' reconstruction of their professional knowledge and skills and to facilitate the dissemination of ideas on the integration of technology in education.

 

Keywords: teacher technological pedagogical knowledge, 21st-century skills, low-technology context, teacher transition to e-learning, technology integration, professional networks, Tunisia

 

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Journal Article

Motivating Factors and Tangential Learning for Knowledge Acquisition in Educational Games  pp343-354

Peter Mozelius, Andreas Fagerström, Max Söderquist

© Aug 2017 Volume 15 Issue 4, Editor: Elizabeth Boyle and Thomas Connolly, pp281 - 366

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Abstract

Game‑based learning has been a strong emerging trend in the 21st century, but several research studies on game‑based learning reports that the educational potential of games has not been fully realised. Many educational games do not combine learning outcomes with entertaining gameplay. At the same time as there is a tendency to digitise and personalise education by the use of digital games, there still exists a lack of knowledge about efficient educational game design. To identify design factors that are important for players' learning motivation this study has analysed three popular entertainment games that were selected for their educational values. The aim of the study is to explore, analyse and discuss, if and how motivating factors and intrinsic integration of knowledge in educational games might be related to players' perceived knowledge acquisition. Test players with experience of the selected digital games were recruited from online gaming forums where a questionnaire also was used to collect data. Lepper's and Malone's set of heuristics for intrinsic motivation in interactive learning environments were used in a combination with Habgood's and Ainsworth's theory of intrinsic integration to examine the relationship between these factors in the educational games. Beside the direct acquisition of knowledge from gaming there was also an analysis of the concept of tangential learning. Results from a t‑test showed that tangential learning was significantly more important for two of the tested games. Correlation analysis revealed several relationships between factors, where intrinsic integration was pointed out as particularly interesting for knowledge acquisition and tangential learning. Results showed weak or no relationships for Lepper and Malone factors, but with some tendencies for control, imagination and competition.

 

Keywords: Educational games, Intrinsic integration, Tangential learning, Game-based learning, Learning motivation

 

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Journal Article

Western Cape Subject Advisors’ Perception of Their Preparedness for Connected Classrooms  pp444-454

Agnes Chigona

© Oct 2017 Volume 15 Issue 5, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Karin Levinsen, pp367 - 466

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Abstract

In South Africa, the Western Cape government (WCG)’s current broadband strategy aims to ensure that all schools will be connected to broadband service within a reasonable time‑frame. According to the WCG integration of ICTs and the broadband will remove the digital divide and enhance curriculum delivery in schools. To achieve this, sensible long‑term planning must be in place to ensure that subject advisors are adequately trained and equipped to participate in the connected schools environment and effectively assist teachers integrate digital resources into classrooms. The aim of this paper is to explore how subject advisors perceive of their preparedness to embrace new technologies for their advisory job; to ensure effective teaching and learning. A qualitative research approach was used; randomly selected education districts in the Western Cape Province provided subject advisors to be participants in the study. Results show that most subject advisors perceive their complex knowledge of how to effectively integrate ICTs into curriculum delivery as inadequate hence are hesitant to advise teachers on effective technology integration into classrooms.

 

Keywords: connectivity, subject advisor, integration, curriculum delivery, 21st Century, South Africa

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 15 Issue 3 / Jun 2017  pp199‑280

Editor: Jarmila Novotná, Antonín Jančařík

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Editorial

 

Keywords: Note-taking, reflection, self-efficacy, student's characteristics, correlation analysis, causal analysis, e-advising, reflection, reflective practitioners, trust, competency, Inquiry Based Learning, GIS education, spatial analysis, Blended Learning, Textbooks, electronic online materials, word problems, non-mathematical content, subversiveness, realia, stereotypes, construction of social reality, culture reproduction, models, projection, science education, 3D projections, interactive models, science education, biology, teacher technological pedagogical knowledge, 21st-century skills, low-technology context, teacher transition to e-learning, technology integration, professional networks, Tunisia

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 15 Issue 5 / Oct 2017  pp367‑466

Editor: Rikke Ørngreen, Karin Levinsen

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Editorial

 

Keywords: Open Teaching; Open Educational Practices; Open Educational Resources; MOOC; Information and Communication Technologies; Open Education; E-learning, E-Resources, e-learning, open and distance education, pre-service teachers, e-Learning practice, continuum, use, e-Teaching, e-Learning, traditional, innovation, systems engineering, systems thinking, systems approach, system dynamics, systems engineering education, systems thinking assessment, educational games, experience accelerator, experiential learning, game-based learning, system analysis and design, systems engineering and theory, simulation, Feasibility, e-learning, Iranian university, strategies, gamification, games and learning, drivers, barriers, teachers, Higher Education, connectivity, subject advisor, integration, curriculum delivery, 21st Century, South Africa, multimedia storytelling; traditional storytelling; foreign language learning; Chinese idiom learning; non-native novices

 

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