The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
For general enquiries email administrator@ejel.org
Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop

Information about the current European Conference on e-Learning is available here

For infomation on the International Conference on eLearning, click here

For infomation on the European Conference on Games Based Learning clickhere

 

Journal Article

Integrating Distributed Learning with just‑in‑context Knowledge Management  pp45-50

Roy. Williams

© Nov 1999 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Roy Williams, pp1 - 50

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

This paper addresses some key design issues in e‑learning, and its integration with knowledge management. The underlying premise is that the purpose of e‑learning is useful knowledge, and that the design of e‑learning should therefore be integrated with the design of related knowledge management — particularly personal knowledge management. e‑learning will be explored using the notion of "distributed learning". Knowledge management will be explored using the notion of "just‑in‑context knowledge", emphasising both the contextual underpinning of knowledge, and its strategic value — that is to say its applied value, and its embeddedness in decision making processes. The potential for distributed learning to optimise shared resources is also explored.

 

Keywords: Distributed learning, e-learning, knowledge management, just-in-context knowledge management, digital learning, blended learning

 

Share |

Journal Article

Collaborative On‑Line Teaching: The Inevitable Path to Deep Learning and Knowledge Sharing?  pp43-50

Karin Tweddell Levinsen

© Feb 2006 Volume 4 Issue 1, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 111

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

It is often stressed that the pedagogic models and approaches of Collaborative Online Learning support a learner's shared knowledge building within collaborating groups of learners, the individual construction of knowledge and the formation of an ongoing learning Community of Practice. Based on a recent case study of a Danish Master's programme, this paper will demonstrate that the emerging collaborative practice displays tendencies contrary to the generally accepted assumptions. The outcome is not only based on the models and their attributes, it is also affected by the emerging practice itself and the interaction among the participants during a course. From this perspective, it is relevant to look at which possibilities and obstacles teachers encounter when they try to detect slowly emerging tendencies that may lead to major misinterpretations of the subject matter and marginalize or even exclude students from participating in the learning Community of Practice. In conclusion, the case study will identify the slowly emerging tendencies that may be detected and observed at an early stage and thus indicate areas in on‑line learning environments that require special attention.

 

Keywords: Collaborative on-line learning, Knowledge construction, Communities of practice, Emerging practice, Proaction, e-Learning

 

Share |

Journal Article

Topic Maps e‑Learning Portal Development  pp60-67

Kamila Olsevicova

© Feb 2006 Volume 4 Issue 1, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 111

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Topic Maps, ISOIEC 13250 standard, are designed to facilitate the organization and navigation of large collections of information objects by creating meta‑level perspectives of their underlying concepts and relationships. The underlying structure of concepts and relations is expressed by domain ontologies. The Topics Maps technology can become the core of an e‑learning portal that will integrate different kinds of information and knowledge resources, available in the educational institution — this idea was explored in the Ph.D. dissertation of the author. The offered portal solution promises to bring advantages both for content consumers (students) and content providers (teachers, administrative staff), but numerous problems hinder the practical implementation of this portal and therefore it requires certain changes in the functioning of the educational institution and asks teachers, teaching assistants and e‑courses designers to change their routines and to develop new skills. In the paper we offer a new methodology for development and maintenance of the Topic Maps e‑learning portal and we briefly present a pilot application.

 

Keywords: e-Learning portal, Ontology engineering, Knowledge methodology, Topic Maps, Omnigator

 

Share |

Journal Article

Web 2.0‑Mediated Competence — Implicit Educational Demands on Learners  pp111-118

Nina Bonderup Dohn

© Jun 2009 Volume 7 Issue 2, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp85 - 190

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

The employment of Web 2.0 within higher educational settings has become increasingly popular. Reasons for doing so include student motivation, didactic considerations of facilitating individual and collaborative knowledge construction, and the support Web 2.0 gives the learner in transgressing and resituating content and practices between the formal and informal learning settings in which she participates. However, introducing Web 2.0‑practices into educational settings leads to tensions and challenges in practice because of conceptual tensions between the views of knowledge and learning inherent in Web 2.0‑practices and in the educational system: Implicit in Web 2.0‑practices is a conception of 'knowledge' as, on the one side, process and activity, i.e. as use, evaluation, transformation and reuse of material, and, on the other, the product side, as a distributed attribute of a whole system (such as Wikipedia) or community of practice (such as the community of practice of Wikipedia contributors). In contrast, 'knowledge' within the educational system is traditionally viewed as a state possessed by the individual, and learning as the acquisition of this state. This paper is an analysis of the challenges which these tensions lead to for the learners. The argument is that Web 2.0‑mediated learning activities within an educational setting place implicit competence demands on the students, along with the more explicit ones of reflexivity, participation and knowledge construction. These demands are to some extent in conflict with each other as well as with the more explicit ones. A simple example of such conflicting competence demands is experienced when students develop a course wiki: The Web 2.0‑competence demands here concern the doing something with the material. The copy‑pasting of e.g. a Wikipedia‑article without referencing it from this point of view is a legitimate contribution to the knowledge building of the course wiki. In contrast, educational competence demands require the student to participate actively in the formulation of the course wiki‑articles. Copy‑pasting without reference from this point of view is cheating. Here, the student is met with the incoherent requirement of authoring entries that display the acquisition of a knowledge state in a context where authorship is renounced and knowledge is understood dynamically and distributively. More generally, in Web 2.0‑mediated educational learning activities, the student is required to manoeuvre in a field of interacting, yet conflicting, demands, and the assessment of hisher competence stands the risk of being more of an evaluation of the skill to so manoeuvre than of skills and knowledge explicitly pursued in the course.

 

Keywords: Web 2.0 in education, wikis, second life, competence, concepts of knowledge, concepts of learning

 

Share |

Journal Article

Moving From Analogue to High Definition e‑Tools to Support Empowering Social Learning Approaches  pp225-238

Paula Charbonneau-Gowdyand, Ivana Cechova

© Dec 2009 Volume 7 Issue 3, Special ICEL 2009 Issue, Editor: Florin Salajan and Avi Hyman, pp191 - 316

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Traditional educational and training settings have dictated that the act of learning is an activity that is motivated by learners, directed by a teacher expert and based on information transfer and data manipulation. In this scenario, it has been assumed that learners more or less acquire knowledge or develop sets of skills as a result of such activity. With this model in place, learning ends when the training activities cease — and implies that repeated doses of similar training are required over time. Various computer technologies, as they have been generally integrated into educational settings, have taken on the role as tools to support such a model. In some cases they are used to replace the teacher in these contexts although not without serious implications for learners and their learning it has been argued. During the last three decades, a growing movement in educational research, based on the theoretical support of Leon Vygtosky and Mikhail Bakhtin, is advocating that the traditional conceptualization of the learning process is misconceived. From the perspective of this movement, learning is understood as a life‑long, social act of constructing knowledge in a dialogic activity with others. Within this model, social interaction is the precursor to higher order thinking rather than the reverse. The challenging question emerging for many educators is how new technologies can support knowledge and skill building in social constructivist‑based learning settings. And a corollary to this question arises: Depending on the particular technology chosen, what are the implications for learning and identity construction? In this paper, we describe the Language Learning Through Conferencing project (LLTC) in which an affordable video‑based web conferencing technology and desktop computers were used to conduct language learning sessions via the Internet. The project description, project content, and the experiences that took place over a sustained period, as well as the potential future for this approach to distance learning in a variety of fields are presented. The aim of the Language Learning Through Conferencing project (LLTC) has been to exploit a particular Web 2.0 technology to connect language learners internationally between Canada and new democracies in Central and Eastern Europe and more recently in the public sector in Canada. More specifically, the project was a means to respond to learners who faced challenges in finding opportunities for language learning both in Europe and in Canada. Outcomes from ongoing qualitative and quantitative findings gathered by the respective authors are indicating that these dialogic opportunities are also having a powerful influence on learners' professional, linguistic and personal identities as well as their views of technology and learning.

 

Keywords: Video-based web conferencing, guided social learning, learner agency, identity and knowledge construction

 

Share |

Journal Article

Development of the Novel e‑Learning System, "SPES NOVA" (Scalable Personality‑Adapted Education System with Networking of Views and Activities)  pp309-316

Ken Takeuchi, Manabu Murakami, Atsushi Kato, Ryuichi Akiyama, Hirotaka Honda, Hajime Nozawa, Ki-ichiro Sato

© Dec 2009 Volume 7 Issue 3, Special ICEL 2009 Issue, Editor: Florin Salajan and Avi Hyman, pp191 - 316

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

The Faculty of Industrial Science and Technology at Tokyo University of Science developed a two‑campus system to produce well‑trained engineers possessing both technical and humanistic traits. In their first year of study, students reside in dormitories in the natural setting of the Oshamambe campus located in Hokkaido, Japan. The education program at Oshamambe instills a rich appreciationawareness of humanity which especially enables them to empathize with nature. The faculty has been developing a novel e‑Learning system called SPES NOVA (Scalable Personality‑Adapted Education System with Networking of Views and Activities). SPES NOVA, which is intended to increase competency in communication skills, is based on a remote meeting system that is accessible simultaneously to multiple users via a Flash plug‑in on the Internet. To link users in separate locations, each user must have a headset and web cam attached to a personal computer with an Internet connection. At Oshamambe, the SPES NOVA e‑Learning system links the students to each other and to the professors. In one of the first applications of SPES NOVA, a student puts on a headset and sits in front of a computer equipped with a camera, and then accesses small‑group instruction of a humanity course based mainly on discussion. An electronic whiteboard is displayed at the center of the monitor, and live‑action shots of the users are arranged around the computer screen. The voice and picture data of the lecture are stored as educational materials on the server. Consequently, students can review an entire lecture as well as their own speech and behavior. The teacher can easily cut segments from the motion pictures of the lecture and combine them into teaching materials. SPES NOVA includes an e‑Learning system that distributes educational materials via a wireless LAN during instruction. The system has also been used effectively in an example of ubiquitous computing in laboratory training courses, which included small group instruction. The students are able to browse the systematic exposition of experimental techniques as well as learn the correct usage of experimental apparatus by using a portable video game player during experiments. The teaching materials contain not only the answers to possible questions, but also the lectures for the day. The e‑Learning system can record the laboratory training course lectures and then stream them back in video format. Furthermore, the portable video game player can save images as well as data from the experiments. This e‑Learning system is connected to the computer network on campus. Therefore, students can review the learning materials by using a personal computer before and after the laboratory training courses. When used during the small group instruction of the laboratory training course, this unique system effectively helps participants develop lecture note‑taking skills, hone communication skills, and learn the correct usage of the experimental apparatus used in liberal arts. Furthermore, with SPES NOVA, we can classify individual students not only according to their academic achievements, but also in relation to their behaviour, temperaments, and lifestyles. Subsequently, we can establish a recursive evaluation system for each student.

 

Keywords: blended learning, knowledge management, communication skill, small group instruction, laboratory training course

 

Share |

Journal Article

Empowering Knowledge‑Building Pedagogy in Online Environments: Creating Digital Moments to Transform Practice:  pp128-137

Wendy Barber, Stacey Taylor, Sylvia Buchanan

© May 2014 Volume 12 Issue 2, ECEL, Editor: Mélanie Ciussi, pp126 - 226

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to examine a specific online pedagogical tool, Digital MomentsŽ that can be an effective strategy for building online communities in a knowledge building environment. While the paper will examine the specific techni ques and teaching methodologies that enabled the authors to create authentic online learning experiences in undergraduate and graduate courses, it also analyses how and why this strategy moves beyond simple constructivist thinking to the complexities of teaching in the digital world. Knowledge building in online environments requires students to take risks, try new digital tools, and find the modalities that work best to express the new knowledge they are creating. This pedagogical approach views studen ts as more than consumers of technology, but creators of new and innovative digital means of expressing concepts. Using both synchronous and asynchronous methodologies, the authors examined the highs and lows of translating meaningful face to face practic e to the online environment. The paper examines teaching strategies used in a six week online graduate course using Adobe connect, Blackboard LMS and synchronous weekly meetings. Through the use of unique strategies such as digital momentsŽ and embracing creative thought, an authentic, constructivist community was created. The authors journey to developing this authenticity, their online pedagogical style and an innovative, safe learning community has been chronicled using narrative qualitative inquiry in this paper. The writers use of digital moments empowers students to create and have ownership of their own online community. This paper articulates their journey into the abyss of digitizing themselves as teachers; it examines the specific techniques used for best practice in online learning, while simultaneously celebrating the splash of colour that is essential to brighten digital learning environments.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Online pedagogy, empowerment, knowledge-building communities, authentic practice

 

Share |

Journal Article

Knowledge Sharing: Exploring Institutional Policy and Educator Practice Through Eportfolios In Music And Writing  pp138-148

Diana Blom, Jennifer Rowley, Dawn Bennett et al

© May 2014 Volume 12 Issue 2, ECEL, Editor: Mélanie Ciussi, pp126 - 226

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: Many higher education institutions have embraced e‑Learning and urge, or make compulsory, engagement by academics. Despite this, it is often the educators themselves who take the initiative to engage with innovative e‑learning approaches. These approaches, in turn, can influence both peer‑ and institution‑wide thinking about e‑Learning. This paper focuses on the introduction or extension of ePortfolios within the creative arts at four Australian universities. Each educator adopted the ePortfolio for a different purpose, and in doing so has influenced, or is at least being monitored by, their university. All four studies have resulted in the growth, development and enrichment of teaching and learning because of the ePortfolios facility to engage students in such activities as reflection, ongoing student‑teacher dialogue, collaborative essay writing, peer evaluation, identity formation, and the documentation of skills, competencies and graduate attributes for career awareness and employability. I n sharing this knowledge the studies have also influenced curriculum design and e‑learning policy. The academic literature notes institutional interest in ePortfolios in relation to career preparation, demonstrating and assessing student learning, academi c advising, and addressing public accountability concerns by facilitating internal and external departmental review and accreditation. Within this paper we discuss the bi‑directional impact and sharing of knowledge about ePortfolio use as it occurs betwee n institution and educator. The study findings inform future development of curriculum, policy and practice for creative arts students and academics in a variety of higher education settings. Further, the findings suggest that ePortfolios provide an effic ient and transparent means to archive and access student work, and that they facilitate internal and external departmental review and broader institutional assessment.

 

Keywords: Keywords: ePortfolio, creative arts, curriculum enhancement, reflective practice, institutional knowledge sharing

 

Share |