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Journal Article

Games as a Platform for Student Participation in Authentic Scientific Research  pp259-270

Rikke Magnussen, Sidse Damgaard Hansen, Tilo Planke, Jacob Friis Sherson

© Jun 2014 Volume 12 Issue 3, Special Edition for ECGBL 2013, Editor: Carlos Vaz de Carvalho and Paula Escudeiro, pp227 - 311

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Abstract

Abstract: This paper presents results from the design and testing of an educational version of Quantum Moves, a Scientific Discovery Game that allows players to help solve authentic scientific challenges in the effort to develop a quantum computer. The pr imary aim of developing a game‑based platform for student‑research collaboration is to investigate if and how this type of game concept can strengthen authentic experimental practice and the creation of new knowledge in science education. Researchers and game developers tested the game in three separate high school classes (Class 1, 2, and 3). The tests were documented using video observations of students playing the game, qualitative interviews, and qualitative and quantitative questionnaires. The fo cus of the tests has been to study players' motivation and their experience of learning through participation in authentic scientific inquiry. In questionnaires conducted in the two first test classes students found that the aspects of doing real scient ific researchŽ and solving physics problems were the more interesting aspects of playing the game. However, designing a game that facilitates professional research collaboration while simultaneously introducing quantum physics to high school students prov ed to be a challenge. A collaborative learning design was implemented in Class 3, where students were given expert roles such as experimental and theoretical physicists. This significantly improved the students feeling of learning physics compared to Cla ss 1 and 2. Overall the results presented in this paper indicate that the possibility of participating in authentic scientific experiments, which this class of games opens, is highly motivating for students. The findings also show that the learning desig n in the class setting must be considered in order to improve the students experience of learning and that various design challenges remain to be addressed even further.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Scientific discovery games, science education, learning games, game-based learning

 

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Journal Article

Developing and Testing a Mobile Learning Games Framework  pp151-166

Carsten Busch, Sabine Claßnitz, André Selmanagić, Martin Steinicke

© Mar 2015 Volume 13 Issue 3, ECGBL 2014, Editor: Busch-Steinicke, pp149 - 206

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Abstract

Abstract: In 2010 1.1 million pupils took private lessons in Germany, with 25% of all German children by the age of 17 having attended paid private lessons at some point in their school career (Klemm & Klemm, 2010). The high demand for support for learn ing curricular content led us to consider an integrated solution that speeds up both the design of mobile learning games as well as their implementation and adaption. This paper describes the iterative development of a game development framework for touch ‑based mobile learning games. The framework focuses on touch‑controlled interaction due to the fact that in 2014 more than 87% of German teenagers possess a smart phone with touch input (Feierabend, Plankenhorn, Rathgeb, 2014) as well as the possibility to engage in short bursts of learning experiences during their idle time, e.g. when commuting. The framework consists of a conceptual component that specifies five different game modes for casual mobile learning games. The technical part of the framework builds on the Unity game engine and offers an architecture that mirrors the game modes and objects from the conceptual part as well as a layer of service building blocks that cover generic functionality like logging, high score management or social media integration. The development of the framework is iterative and cyclic in that each produced game enriches the framework, which in turn accelerates the prototyping and development of further games. Additionally the games themselves are developed and teste d iteratively … both concerning usability/user‑experience and transfer, which is described in this paper. developed game prototype as well as the results of our usability tests.

 

Keywords: Keywords: mobile learning games, touch interfaces, private lessons, usability, software framework, transfer

 

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Journal Article

Exploring the Relation between the Theory of Multiple Intelligences and Games For the Purpose of Player‑Centred Game Design  pp320-334

Pejman Sajjadi, Joachim Vlieghe, Olga De Troyer

© Aug 2017 Volume 15 Issue 4, Editor: Elizabeth Boyle and Thomas Connolly, pp281 - 366

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Abstract

A large body of research work demonstrates the importance and effectiveness of adapting a learning game to its players. This process is driven by understanding the differences between individuals in terms of abilities and preferences. One of the rather interesting but least explored approaches for understanding individual differences among learners is Gardner’s theory of Multiple Intelligences (MI). Gardner suggests that people exhibit multiple dimensions of intelligence or abilities. In the literature, it is suggested that people with different types of intellectual strengths (intelligences) often exhibit clear preferences toward specific modalities and types of interaction and content in relation to learning. This raises the question whether this knowledge could be transferred and employed in adapting learning games to players, more in particular for the purpose of improving the game and/or learning experience, as well as the learning outcome of the players. Although various claims regarding the existence of a relationship between MI and games have been made, none of them are substantiated with empirical evidence. This paper presents the results of an empirical study that has led to evidence‑based mappings between the different dimensions of intelligences proposed in MI and the fundamental building blocks of games, i.e. game mechanics. These mappings indicate which game mechanics suit which MI dimensions, and can therefore act as design guidelines when designing games targeting people exhibiting dominance for specific MI dimensions. A tool that visualizes these mappings and facilitates their use in the design of such player‑centred (learning) games is also presented.

 

Keywords: Multiple intelligences; Game preferences; Game mechanics; Evidence-based; Game design; Learning games

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 15 Issue 4 / Aug 2017  pp281‑366

Editor: Elizabeth Boyle, Thomas Connolly

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Editorial

 

Keywords: Sign Language; American Sign Language; Recognition System; Kinect; Expert System; Game-Based Learning; Knowledge Engineering, Visual programming, Education, Computational thinking, K-12, Lightbot, Scratch, Microgames, learning, gender, culture, Multiple intelligences; Game preferences; Game mechanics; Evidence-based; Game design; Learning games, Collaboration, problem solving, online assessment, log stream data, measurement, e-learning, Educational Video Games; TAM (Technology Acceptance Model); Higher Education; Behavioural intention; Age

 

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