The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

Use of Adaptive Study Material in Education in E‑learning Environment  pp172-182

Kateřina Kostolányová, Jana Šarmanová

© May 2014 Volume 12 Issue 2, ECEL, Editor: Mélanie Ciussi, pp126 - 226

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Abstract

Abstract: Personalised education is a topical matter today and the impact of ICT on education has been covered extensively. The adaptation of education to various types of student is an issue of a vast number of papers presented at diverse conferences. Th e topic incorporates the fields of information technologies and eLearning, but in no small part also the field of pedagogy. By interconnecting eLearning with the requirement for personalized education, we obtain a new term … automatic adaptive learning. W e asked ourselves a question if the process of automatic adaptive learning (i.e. going through the electronic study course which suits students preferences and learning style) can be modeled. The optimal adaptive process will respect students differen ces based on determined learning styles and with regard to their knowledge and skills as changed during the course. On the basis of identification of their personal characteristics and qualities, students will be presented with a study material which suit s them the most. One of the basic building blocks of adaptive education is the storage of study materials. In order to be able to prepare tailored education for every type of student, study material must be prepared in many different variants, in differen t form. This form should be different from the classic form of text‑books. This article presents the issues connected with the creation of study materials suitable for adaptive education in more detail; the basis for this is the pedagogical analysis of th e starting prerequisites applicable in eLearning. In conclusion, a particular way of use of such created study material in electronic adaptive education will be outlined.

 

Keywords: Keywords: study material, adaptation, learning style, creation of methodology, e-learning, personalization of education, theory of adaptive e-learning

 

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Journal Article

A Data Warehouse Model for Micro‑Level Decision Making in Higher Education  pp235-244

Liezl van Dyk

© Nov 2008 Volume 6 Issue 3, Editor: Shirley Williams, Laura Czerniewicz, pp161 - 254

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Abstract

An abundance of research, by educational researchers and scholars of teaching and learning alike, can be found on the use of ICT to plan design and deliver learning activities and assessment activities. The first steps of the instructional design process are covered quite thoroughly by this. However, the use of ICT and quantitative methods to close the instructional design cycle by supporting sustainable decision making with respect to the evaluation of the effectiveness of teaching processes hold much unleashed potential. In this paper a business intelligence approach is followed in an attempt to take advantage ICT to enable the evaluation of the effectiveness of the process of facilitating learning. The focus is on micro‑level decision support based on data drawn from the Learning Management System (LMS). Three quantifiable measures of online behaviour and three quantifiable measures of teaching effectiveness are identified from literature to arrive at a 3x3 matrix according to which 9 measures of e‑teaching effectiveness can be derived by means of pair‑wise correlation. The value and significance of information are increased within context of other information. In this paper it is shown how the value of LMS tracking data increases within context of data from other modules or others years and that useful information is created when this tracking data is correlated with measures of teaching effectives such as results, learning styles and student satisfaction. This information context can only be created when a deliberate business intelligence approach if followed. In this paper a data warehouse model is proposed to accomplish exactly this.

 

Keywords: learning management system, data warehouse, student tracking, decision support, student feedback, learning styles

 

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Journal Article

Pilot Program of Online Learning in Three Small High Schools: Considerations of Learning Styles  pp353-366

Abigail Garthwait

© Jul 2014 Volume 12 Issue 4, Editor: Dr Rikke Ørngreen and Dr Karin Tweddell Levinsen, pp313 - 410

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Abstract

Abstract: This case study was conducted in three schools in Maine, United States. The goal of this qualitative research was two‑fold: to describe the process used by a small educational consortium as it initiated formal online education, and to view this experience through the lens of students' preferred learning styles. The United States does not have a national curriculum. While the government of Maine offers some state‑level support for schools, many educational issues and initiatives are controlled a t the local level. Additionally, Maine is one of the most rural states in the country and the isolated nature of these schools adds to the dearth of curricular opportunities for students ages 14‑18. Data was collected using the Felder & Solomon (1993) Learning Styles Questionnaire and semi‑structured, bi‑semester interviews with ten students. Open and axial coding was used to identify themes, which were subsequently triangulated with a document review and the two sets of interviews with the three adul t coordinators. Findings fell within two groupings: data that substantiated prior research, and data that offer contradictory conclusions. Learning styles have an important place in online learning. However transactional distance, teacher response time, group work, and school filtering issues also emerged as critical. Conclusions carry implications for online educators, school administrators, and policy makers

 

Keywords: Keywords: online education, secondary education, learning styles, case study, transactional distance

 

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Journal Article

Affordances of Educational Learning Technologies in Higher Education Multicultural Environments Multicultural Learning Environments  pp217-227

Edilson Arenas

© Apr 2015 Volume 13 Issue 4, ECEL 2014, Editor: Kim Long, pp205 - 315

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Abstract

Abstract: A raft of studies have been undertakencluster of research has been conducted in higher education to investigate the action possibilitiesaffordances (action possibilities) and the influence information and communication technologies (ICT) may have onin students learning experiences and outcomes. Such studies have given rise to the implementation of a wide range of educational frameworks with a great deal of empirical evidence on the benefits of using technologies to improve learning. However , these benefits do not appear to have fulfilled higher education expectations for more meaningful and transformative learning experiences. In this paper, I argue that part of the problem is either the content or teacher…centric perspective of these frame works and the need to explore the benefits from a more student…centric perspective. Learning is contextual, with learners having different abilities to learn and varying preferences for educational technologies with greater potential to facilitate their l earning activities. Drawing on an ethnographic study of culturally diverse computing students and teachers within learning environments that blend online and face‑to‑face pedagogies, I argue that, that our understanding of what ICT has to offer for the de sign and implementation of transformative learning activities is a far more complex issue than is often anticipated, particularly in the design and implementation of learning for computer science programs.

 

Keywords: Keywords: academic disciplines, computer science, computing science education, e-learning, ICT affordances, learners preferences, learning styles, learning technologies, media affordances, online learning

 

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Journal Article

Learner Differences in Perceived Satisfaction of an Online Learning: an Extension to the Technology Acceptance Model in an Arabic Sample  pp412-430

Ahmed Al-Azawei, Karsten Lundqvist

© Oct 2015 Volume 13 Issue 5, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Karin Levinsen, pp317 - 445

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Abstract

Abstract: Online learning constitutes the most popular distance‑learning method, with flexibility, accessibility, visibility, manageability and availability as its core features. However, current research indicates that its efficacy is not consistent acro ss all learners. This study aimed to modify and extend the factors of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to examine perceived satisfaction of an Arabic sample in online learning. The integrated factors in the modified model includes: deep level (lea rning styles), surface level (gender), and cognitive (online self‑efficacy) factors. Learning styles were chosen as a central factor. Hence, the online course was purposefully developed to support one pole in each dimension of Felder and Silverman Le arning Styles Model (FSLSM) in order to reveal the pedagogical implications of learning styles on learner satisfaction. A total of 70 learners participated voluntarily in the research. At the end of the online course, they were requested to fill in two questionnaires: the Index of Learning Styles (ILS) and a standard questionnaire. The psychometric properties of the latter were firstly analysed to validate the instrument. Then, Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modelling (PLS‑SEM) was conduc ted to examine the proposed hypotheses. The model achieves an acceptable fit and explains 44.8% of variance. Perceived usefulness represented the best predictor, whereas online self‑efficacy and perceived ease of use failed to show a direct impact on perc eived satisfaction. Furthermore, neither learning styles nor gender diversity had direct influence on the dependent factors. Accordingly, the research suggested that other variables may have to be integrated to enhance the power of the model.

 

Keywords: Keywords: online learning, learning styles, gender diversity, online self-efficacy, learner satisfaction, Technology Acceptance Model, TAM

 

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