The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

Integrating Distributed Learning with just‑in‑context Knowledge Management  pp45-50

Roy. Williams

© Nov 1999 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Roy Williams, pp1 - 50

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Abstract

This paper addresses some key design issues in e‑learning, and its integration with knowledge management. The underlying premise is that the purpose of e‑learning is useful knowledge, and that the design of e‑learning should therefore be integrated with the design of related knowledge management — particularly personal knowledge management. e‑learning will be explored using the notion of "distributed learning". Knowledge management will be explored using the notion of "just‑in‑context knowledge", emphasising both the contextual underpinning of knowledge, and its strategic value — that is to say its applied value, and its embeddedness in decision making processes. The potential for distributed learning to optimise shared resources is also explored.

 

Keywords: Distributed learning, e-learning, knowledge management, just-in-context knowledge management, digital learning, blended learning

 

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Journal Article

Competency — and Process‑Driven e‑Learning — a Model‑Based Approach  pp183-194

Katrina Leyking, Pavlina Chikova, Peter Loos

© Dec 2007 Volume 5 Issue 3, ICEL 2007, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp173 - 250

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Abstract

As a matter of fact e‑Learning still has not really caught on for corporate training purposes. Investigations on the reasons reveal that e‑Learning modules like WBTs often miss any relevance for the tasks to be accomplished in the day‑to‑day workplace settings. The very learning needs both from an organizational and individual perspective are neglected. Content brought to the learner very often meets neither the individual competency gaps nor the organizational learning goals. Time passed between acquisition and application of knowledge is too long. In short, business processes on the one side and learning‑related processes on the other are not aligned adequately. Thus, we see an urgent need for concepts on how to derive corporate training actions from business tasks in order to improve employees' business performance. This paper presents an integrated approach for competency‑ and business process‑driven learning management supported by information technology (IT), developed within two projects named PROLIX and EXPLAIN.

 

Keywords: authoring, business process management, competency development, learning content, learning objectives, learning processes

 

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Journal Article

Implementing International Virtual Elementary Classroom Activities for Public School Students in the U.S. and Korea  pp207-218

Eunhee Jung O'Neill

© Dec 2007 Volume 5 Issue 3, ICEL 2007, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp173 - 250

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Abstract

In today's global society, individuals with an understanding of different cultures that have the ability to apply this understanding to real world problem solving are more likely to become leaders. Preparing students for a global society is becoming a significant part of education. While many international online exchange projects have been conducted at schools to help expose students to the world and experience international collaborations, few studies have focused on both developing intercultural competence for elementary school students and discovering practical ways of implementing a cross‑cultural exchange program into the public elementary school systems as well. This study, International Virtual Elementary Classroom Activities (IVECA), planned to explore how American and Korean students can develop culturally meaningful interactions through asynchronous online communications in a content management system (CMS), Blackboard; and investigate the factors or strategies useful for integrating IVECA into public school curricula. Data were collected using observation and interview methods, and also included reviewing students' journals. The data analysis involved interpretive analytic induction. Findings indicated that IVECA (a) promotes students' intercultural competence; (b) developed their social interaction skills both in the regular classrooms and the virtual classroom; (c) facilitated diverse students' motivations for learning at school; (d) enhanced writing and reading skills; and (e) engaged learning disabled students in the classroom activities. Additional findings from this study indicate that (a) a systematic support system for teachers' technology use and instructional design is necessary, and (b) school administrators' positive perception toward cross‑cultural exchange activities and their coherent connections between state learning standards and IVECA objectives are important. Further considerations are addressed and the different influences of IVECA on the U.S. students and Korean students and its implementation, which takes into consideration such influences, will also be discussed.

 

Keywords: international virtual elementary classroom exchanges, intercultural competence, cultural awareness, online content management system, technology integration strategies, instructional technology support system

 

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Journal Article

A Sociological Inquiry into Time Management in Postgraduate Studies by e‑Learning in Greece  pp66-75

Marios Vryonides

© Mar 2008 Volume 6 Issue 1, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 75

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Abstract

This paper presents the findings from a small scale sociological investigation which studied the way mature students manage their time while attending to postgraduate studies by e‑learning. Thirty postgraduate students from the University of the Aegean, Greece, were asked to record their daily activities using a semi‑structured time‑use diary over a period when the demands of the course were at their peak. Follow up interviews with the students were conducted once they handed in their diaries whereby they were asked to reflect on their recorded activities. Two groups of students have emerged from analysing the diaries as having distinctive patterns of time usage; namely, married women with children and married men and single individuals. Policy implications are discussed, as the disparities in the experience of attending to e‑learning programmes while at home constitute a severe source of resistance to the stated aim of e‑ learning programmes, which is to overcome social and geographical marginalisation.

 

Keywords: e-learning Greece postgraduate studies time-management widening participation

 

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Journal Article

A Data Warehouse Model for Micro‑Level Decision Making in Higher Education  pp235-244

Liezl van Dyk

© Nov 2008 Volume 6 Issue 3, Editor: Shirley Williams, Laura Czerniewicz, pp161 - 254

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Abstract

An abundance of research, by educational researchers and scholars of teaching and learning alike, can be found on the use of ICT to plan design and deliver learning activities and assessment activities. The first steps of the instructional design process are covered quite thoroughly by this. However, the use of ICT and quantitative methods to close the instructional design cycle by supporting sustainable decision making with respect to the evaluation of the effectiveness of teaching processes hold much unleashed potential. In this paper a business intelligence approach is followed in an attempt to take advantage ICT to enable the evaluation of the effectiveness of the process of facilitating learning. The focus is on micro‑level decision support based on data drawn from the Learning Management System (LMS). Three quantifiable measures of online behaviour and three quantifiable measures of teaching effectiveness are identified from literature to arrive at a 3x3 matrix according to which 9 measures of e‑teaching effectiveness can be derived by means of pair‑wise correlation. The value and significance of information are increased within context of other information. In this paper it is shown how the value of LMS tracking data increases within context of data from other modules or others years and that useful information is created when this tracking data is correlated with measures of teaching effectives such as results, learning styles and student satisfaction. This information context can only be created when a deliberate business intelligence approach if followed. In this paper a data warehouse model is proposed to accomplish exactly this.

 

Keywords: learning management system, data warehouse, student tracking, decision support, student feedback, learning styles

 

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Journal Article

Development of the Novel e‑Learning System, "SPES NOVA" (Scalable Personality‑Adapted Education System with Networking of Views and Activities)  pp309-316

Ken Takeuchi, Manabu Murakami, Atsushi Kato, Ryuichi Akiyama, Hirotaka Honda, Hajime Nozawa, Ki-ichiro Sato

© Dec 2009 Volume 7 Issue 3, Special ICEL 2009 Issue, Editor: Florin Salajan and Avi Hyman, pp191 - 316

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Abstract

The Faculty of Industrial Science and Technology at Tokyo University of Science developed a two‑campus system to produce well‑trained engineers possessing both technical and humanistic traits. In their first year of study, students reside in dormitories in the natural setting of the Oshamambe campus located in Hokkaido, Japan. The education program at Oshamambe instills a rich appreciationawareness of humanity which especially enables them to empathize with nature. The faculty has been developing a novel e‑Learning system called SPES NOVA (Scalable Personality‑Adapted Education System with Networking of Views and Activities). SPES NOVA, which is intended to increase competency in communication skills, is based on a remote meeting system that is accessible simultaneously to multiple users via a Flash plug‑in on the Internet. To link users in separate locations, each user must have a headset and web cam attached to a personal computer with an Internet connection. At Oshamambe, the SPES NOVA e‑Learning system links the students to each other and to the professors. In one of the first applications of SPES NOVA, a student puts on a headset and sits in front of a computer equipped with a camera, and then accesses small‑group instruction of a humanity course based mainly on discussion. An electronic whiteboard is displayed at the center of the monitor, and live‑action shots of the users are arranged around the computer screen. The voice and picture data of the lecture are stored as educational materials on the server. Consequently, students can review an entire lecture as well as their own speech and behavior. The teacher can easily cut segments from the motion pictures of the lecture and combine them into teaching materials. SPES NOVA includes an e‑Learning system that distributes educational materials via a wireless LAN during instruction. The system has also been used effectively in an example of ubiquitous computing in laboratory training courses, which included small group instruction. The students are able to browse the systematic exposition of experimental techniques as well as learn the correct usage of experimental apparatus by using a portable video game player during experiments. The teaching materials contain not only the answers to possible questions, but also the lectures for the day. The e‑Learning system can record the laboratory training course lectures and then stream them back in video format. Furthermore, the portable video game player can save images as well as data from the experiments. This e‑Learning system is connected to the computer network on campus. Therefore, students can review the learning materials by using a personal computer before and after the laboratory training courses. When used during the small group instruction of the laboratory training course, this unique system effectively helps participants develop lecture note‑taking skills, hone communication skills, and learn the correct usage of the experimental apparatus used in liberal arts. Furthermore, with SPES NOVA, we can classify individual students not only according to their academic achievements, but also in relation to their behaviour, temperaments, and lifestyles. Subsequently, we can establish a recursive evaluation system for each student.

 

Keywords: blended learning, knowledge management, communication skill, small group instruction, laboratory training course

 

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Journal Article

The VLE as a Trojan Mouse: Policy, Politics and Pragmatism  pp63-72

Mark Brown, Shelley Paewai, Gordon Suddaby

© Mar 2010 Volume 8 Issue 2, ECEL 2009, Editor: Shirley Williams, Florin Salajan, pp51 - 208

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Abstract

This paper argues that selecting a new Learning Management System (LMS) is a strategic decision about the future direction of your institution. However, the development of a robust methodology for the selection of a new LMS is particularly challenging given the fluidity of the elearning environment. This is especially so when both quantitative and qualitative factors are overlaid by institutional requirements involving political considerations. Selecting the technology is only part of the process and the least problematic aspect. The real challenges are embedded in institutional culture. The paper reflects on the tactics, strategies and approval process involved in the decision to adopt Moodle to replace a proprietary system for the delivery of learning in New Zealand's largest university‑level distance education provider. Critical to the process was the explication of guiding principles, pedagogical criteria and identification of institutional requirements, along with politically astute alliances and allegiances to inform and endorse the selection process. Those centrally involved in the decision process draw on their experiences and reflect on the type of questions that senior managers need to ask when considering new strategic initiatives in open and distance learning.

 

Keywords: Moodle, learning management system, policy, leadership, institutional culture

 

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Journal Article

Fostering a web 2.0 ethos in a traditional e‑learning environment  pp360-368

Marie Martin, Michaela Noakes

© Aug 2012 Volume 10 Issue 3, Special ECEL issue, Editor: Sue Greener and Asher Rospigliosi, pp257 - 379

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Abstract

As technology continues to flatten the world and as Web 2.0 changes the way knowledge is created and shared, tertiary education institutions are turning increasingly to e‑learning to extend access to students globally as well as to improve the quality of their learning experience. Learning Management Systems (LMS) currently dominate the delivery of e‑learning at this level. Though these systems have extended functionality by including some Web 2.0 tools, they are generally perceived as a walled gardenŽ , essentially embodying the traditional transmission paradigm of teaching and learning rather than the philosophy of Web 2.0. This is leading, particularly in the blogosphere, to calls to break down the walls of the LMS and to explore more open online cou rses. There is, however, an emerging view that Web 2.0 ideals can be realised within an LMS environment, provided the environment is aligned with these ideals. This paper supports that view. It presents a case study of an eight‑week e‑learning course base d on this premise, offered first in spring 2011, with a second iteration in spring 2012, as part of a doctoral programme in Instructional Technology by Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, USA, and designed and delivered within an LMS by an instructor living in Northern Ireland. The course is underpinned by the concept of learning by wandering. The pedagogy is aligned with the fundamental Web 2.0 philosophy. Within broad parameters, it is flexible, student‑centred and, from an early stage, student‑led. Studen ts are encouraged to use a variety of Web 2.0 tools, according to their preferences, to collaborate in preparation for their leadership role and as a language to express their ideas and to share their learning. The teachers role is identified as sage at the side. This case study is intended to contribute to the provision of a framework for transformative e‑learning through fostering a Web 2.0 ethos within a traditional learning environment.

 

Keywords: learning management systems, Web 2.0 ethos, case study, learning by wandering, sage at the side, transformative e-learning

 

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