The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

An e‑Class in Action: Experiences with ICT‑intensive Teaching and Learning of Discrete Dynamical Models at Secondary School  pp41-53

André Heck, Harm Houwing, Cor de Beurs

© May 2009 Volume 7 Issue 1, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 85

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Abstract

In 2007, a small team of university and secondary school teachers jointly developed and piloted an e‑class for 4 and 5 grade students (age: 16‑17yrs) at both pre‑university and general vocational level. The goal was to develop and try out innovative ways of teaching mathematics that would enable schools to offer optional courses for small numbers of students. The e‑class can be summarized as web‑supported instruction in a blended learning approach. The instructional material consisted of the chapter on discrete dynamical models from a brand‑new mathematics textbook, supplemented by investigative activities. Students could build and simulate dynamical models with the computer learning environment Coach. Instructions for learning to work with software were given through screen casts created by the teacher to gear with students' needs and made available in the Sakai‑based virtual learning environment. Students got weekly on‑line assignments, which they submitted digi‑ tally. At home they could get assistance from peers and the teacher in a chat room. We discuss some of the e‑ ingredients of the e‑class and their potential for teaching and learning mathematics and science in terms of principled design approaches to multimedia learning and pedagogical arrangements. We report the experiences of the participants of the project and present the future plans based on this work.

 

Keywords: e-learning, blended learning, multimedia learning, e-learning implementation, screen casts, secondary mathematics education, discrete dynamic models

 

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Journal Article

Blended Learning in the Visual Communications Classroom: Student Reflections on a Multimedia Course  pp247-256

Jennifer George-Palilonis, Vincent Filak

© Dec 2009 Volume 7 Issue 3, Special ICEL 2009 Issue, Editor: Florin Salajan and Avi Hyman, pp191 - 316

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Abstract

Advances in digital technology and a rapidly evolving media landscape continue to dramatically change teaching and learning. Among these changes is the emergence of multimedia teaching and learning tools, online degree programs, and hybrid classes that blend traditional and digital content delivery. At the same time, visual communication programs that are traditionally print‑centric have had to make room for Web design and multimedia storytelling courses, as well as technical skills development. To add parsimony to these two areas of study, we chronicle how a blended model has been introduced in a required, 100‑level visual communication course through a longitudinal study that followed 174 students through two versions of the same course, one that used blended learning strategies and one that participated in a more traditional method of course delivery. In combining an analysis of statements made by the participants in weekly journals (n=13,552) and the data gathered through a survey (n=174), we compared reactions between the two groups. Additionally, qualitative data from the journals was used to fully explicate the reactions students had to the course. This study sheds light on the effectiveness of a blended model in the context of students' enjoyment, engagement, and perceived learning outcomes. The results revealed that the blended model was in no way different from the traditional course in terms of engagement and attachment. Journal data revealed students in the blended sections were significantly less negative about the course material, personal achievement, technology, and their emotional reactions than their traditional counterparts. Additionally, statements made by students regarding the issue of fear of the course and problems regarding technology substantially faded over the 15‑week semester. Our overall findings indicate that students are able to adapt well to the technology and processes that make blended learning different from traditional classroom learning. Implications for pedagogy and future research are discussed.

 

Keywords: blended learning, visual communication, multimedia teaching and learning

 

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Journal Article

Analysis of Social Worker and Educator's Areas of Intervention Through Multimedia Concept Maps And Online Discussion Forums In Higher Education  pp333-346

Esteban Vázquez-Cano, Eloy López Meneses, José Luis Sarasola Sánchez-Serrano

© Oct 2015 Volume 13 Issue 5, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Karin Levinsen, pp317 - 445

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Abstract

Abstract: This diachronic study describes an innovative university experience consisting of the development of multimedia concept maps (MCM) in relation to social educators and social workers main intervention areas and an active discussion in online fo rums about the results obtained. These MCMs were prepared by students who attended the Information Technologies and Communication course as part of the Degree in Social Education and dual Degree in Social Education and Work during the academic years 2010‑ 13 at Pablo Olavide University (Seville‑Spain). Following a methodological framework based on virtual, collaborative action‑research, a qualitative analysis is implemented to analyze 213 MCMs created by students and their interventions in ad hoc online discussion forums with a twofold methodological approach: firstly a qualitative analysis of word frequencies in MCM through the use of Atlas‑Ti software and secondly a forum discussion categorization through a reticular, category based social network anal ysis using UCINET and yED Graph Editor. Among the most relevant conclusions, we can highlight that a combination of MCMs and discussion forums are highly interactive and collaborative digital resources and are especially beneficial when applied to social studies. Students were able to identify and categorize key areas of social and educational intervention, including: seniors, children, teens and drug dependence, people with disabilities, adults, mental health, socio‑community care, and immigrants.

 

Keywords: Keywords: social educator, social worker, multimedia concept maps, forums, online discussion, Higher Education

 

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Journal Article

Learner‑Centred Teaching Contributes in Promising Results in Improving Learner Understanding and Motivation: A Case Study at Malaysia Tertiary Education  pp266-281

Wei-Li Yap, Mai Neo, Tse-Kian Neo

© Nov 2016 Volume 14 Issue 4, Editor: Guest Editors, Rozhan M. Idrus and Nurkhamimi Zainuddin, pp233 - 290

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Abstract

In Malaysia, traditional teaching is still a common approach among many lecturers. There have been many studies reported its limitations and many lecturers have started to adopt more learner‑centred teaching approach to promote better learner understanding and learner motivation. Throughout this effort, it is noticed there are lecturers who could not be assured and felt uncertain about this transition because they went through traditional teaching environment during their studies. Due to this, the effort in shifting from traditional teaching to a more learner‑centred teaching has been challenging and hard‑hitting. Nevertheless, educational and multimedia technology has played an important role in creating a more interesting and engaging learning environments for our digital natives in this 21st century. In this research, a framework is to be proposed based on Weimer’s Learner‑Centred Teaching model and through the incorporation of educational technology and multimedia technology in the learning environments. This proposed framework describes how this learner‑centred teaching environment could promote better learner experiences by increasing retention rate and improving learner motivation. This proposed framework is recommended through the triangulation results from pre‑test/ post‑test, learning environments surveys and students’ written comments, which in turn serves as a guideline for lecturers to identify how they could progressively shift to learner‑centred teaching environment.

 

Keywords: learner-centred teaching, interactive multimedia learning, learner motivation, learner understanding

 

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Journal Article

Measuring the Effectiveness of Educational Technology: what are we Attempting to Measure?  pp273-280

Jodie Jenkinson

© Dec 2009 Volume 7 Issue 3, Special ICEL 2009 Issue, Editor: Florin Salajan and Avi Hyman, pp191 - 316

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Abstract

In many academic areas, students' success depends upon their ability to envision and manipulate complex multidimensional information spaces. Fields in which students struggle with mastering these types of representations include (but are by no means limited to) mathematics, science, medicine, and engineering. There has been some educational research examining the impact of incorporating multiple media modalities into curriculum specific to these disciplines. For example, both Richard Mayer (multimedia learning) and John Sweller (cognitive load) have contributed greatly to establishing theories describing the basic mechanisms of learning in a multimedia environment. However when we attempt to apply these theories to the evaluation of e‑ learning in a more dynamic "real world" context the information processing model that forms the basis of this research fails to capture the complex interactions that occur between the learner and the knowledge object. It is not surprising that studies examining the effectiveness of e‑learning technology, particularly in the area of basic science, have reported mixed results. In part this may be due to the quality of the stimuli being assessed. This may also be explained by the context in which interactivity is being utilized and the model that is used to evaluate its effectiveness. Educational researchers have begun to identify a need for more fine‑grained research studies that capture the subtleties of learners' interactions with dynamic and interactive learning objects. In undergraduate medical and life science education, interactive technology has been integrated into the curriculum at many levels. This paper reviews experimental studies drawn from personal experience where an attempt has been made to measure the efficacy of educational technology. In examining the shortcomings of these more traditional experiments, we can then apply this understanding to characterizing a more flexible approach to evaluation and its potential in measuring the effectiveness of educational technology. Understanding the nature of technology‑mediated learning interactions and the way in which they foster depth of understanding is a great challenge for both educational researchers and developers of e‑learning technologies. By adopting an evaluative framework that takes a more flexible approach to measuring the emergent nature of understanding, we can examine the capacity of educational technology to support more complex understanding of curricular subject matter.

 

Keywords: science, e-learning, educational technology, evaluation, multimedia

 

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