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Journal Article

Cognitive Style and Attitudes Towards Using Online Learning and Assessment Methods  pp21-28

Martin Graff

© Nov 1999 Volume 1 Issue 1, Editor: Roy Williams, pp1 - 50

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Abstract

The studies described in this paper sought to investigate several forms of online learning and assessment methods in terms their efficacy in facilitating student learning. The studies also sought to investigate how participants rated each method. Attitudes toward computer‑assisted learning were not related to performance on each of the online methods employed, whereas some relationships were noted between cognitive styles and online learning and assessment. Finally, evaluation feedback from participants indicated that each online task was rated positively. Implications of the findings for further implementation of online instructional methods are discussed.

 

Keywords: Cognitive style, literature search, online discussion, online assessment

 

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Journal Article

Students’ use of Asynchronous Voice Discussion in a Blended‑Learning Environment: A study of two undergraduate classes  pp360-367

Khe Foon Hew, Wing Sum Cheung

© Oct 2012 Volume 10 Issue 4, ICEL 2012, Editor: Paul Lam, pp360 - 440

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Abstract

Contemporary discussions of education in blended‑learning environments increasingly emphasize the social nature of learning which emphasizes interactions among students, or among students and instructors. These interactions can occur asynchronously using a text based discussion forum. A text‑based discussion forum, however, may not work well for all participants as some find it difficult to explain complex concepts in words, while others complain of being misunderstood due to the absence of verbal cues. In this study, we investigated the use of a Wimba Voice Board to support asynchronous voice discussion. A quasi‑experiment research design involving two classes of undergraduate students was conducted. One of the classes (n = 24 students) used the Wimba Voice Board while the other (n = 18 students) used a text discussion forum in BlackBoard. The results of an independent t‑test analysis suggested that there was no significant difference in the students’ degree of participation in the two classes, asynchronous voice discuss class (M = 2.92, SD = 1.586) and text discussion class (M = 2.78, SD = 1.353), (t = 0.299, df = 40, p = 0.767) at the 0.05 level of significance. However, the online discussion appeared to be more sustained in the asynchronous voice discussion group. Analyses of the students’ reflection data suggested that asynchronous voice discussion have several advantages over text forums. Specifically, an asynchronous voice discussion: enables students to understand one another’s messages better, allows students, who prefer speaking to writing, or students who are not proficient in written English, to participate in the discussion, promotes originality of students’ ideas, and helps to foster a sense of online community.

 

Keywords: blended-learning, asynchronous online discussion, voice board, discussion forum, participation, Wimba Voice Board

 

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Journal Article

Analysis of Social Worker and Educator's Areas of Intervention Through Multimedia Concept Maps And Online Discussion Forums In Higher Education  pp333-346

Esteban Vázquez-Cano, Eloy López Meneses, José Luis Sarasola Sánchez-Serrano

© Oct 2015 Volume 13 Issue 5, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Karin Levinsen, pp317 - 445

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Abstract

Abstract: This diachronic study describes an innovative university experience consisting of the development of multimedia concept maps (MCM) in relation to social educators and social workers main intervention areas and an active discussion in online fo rums about the results obtained. These MCMs were prepared by students who attended the Information Technologies and Communication course as part of the Degree in Social Education and dual Degree in Social Education and Work during the academic years 2010‑ 13 at Pablo Olavide University (Seville‑Spain). Following a methodological framework based on virtual, collaborative action‑research, a qualitative analysis is implemented to analyze 213 MCMs created by students and their interventions in ad hoc online discussion forums with a twofold methodological approach: firstly a qualitative analysis of word frequencies in MCM through the use of Atlas‑Ti software and secondly a forum discussion categorization through a reticular, category based social network anal ysis using UCINET and yED Graph Editor. Among the most relevant conclusions, we can highlight that a combination of MCMs and discussion forums are highly interactive and collaborative digital resources and are especially beneficial when applied to social studies. Students were able to identify and categorize key areas of social and educational intervention, including: seniors, children, teens and drug dependence, people with disabilities, adults, mental health, socio‑community care, and immigrants.

 

Keywords: Keywords: social educator, social worker, multimedia concept maps, forums, online discussion, Higher Education

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 10 Issue 4, ICEL 2012 / Oct 2012  pp360‑440

Editor: Paul Lam

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Keywords: Multi-disciplinary Learning, Teamwork, Database Application Development, blended-learning, asynchronous online discussion, voice board, discussion forum, participation, Wimba Voice Board, first person point of view, learning in the first person, paramedic science, paramedic science skills, skill acquisition, experiential learning, video learning materials,

 

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