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Journal Article

'I am not a Person with a Creative Mind': Facilitating Creativity in the Undergraduate Curriculum Through a Design‑Based Research Approach  pp111-125

Denise Wood, Carolyn Bilsborow

© Feb 2014 Volume 12 Issue 1, ICEL2013, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 125

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Abstract

Abstract: Today's graduates need the skills to enable them to 'persevere in the face of complexity and unresolvability' (McWilliam and Haukka 2008: 660), and to respond creatively in work environments that are increasingly dependent on digital technolog ies (Cunningham 2006). However, although many higher education institutions (HEIs) acknowledge the importance of creativity within the curriculum (McWilliam 2007a), it is argued that universities are failing to equip graduates with the creative skil ls they require to be effective in the workplace. Design‑based learning (also referred to as learning by design) is ideally suited to facilitating the development of creative problem solving (CPS) skills by engaging students in complex learning activi ties involving the active construction of knowledge through a series of iterative cycles of experimentation and refinement of concepts (Naidu 2004). Similarly, design‑based research (DBR) involves a series of iterative steps to design and develop lear ning environments and theories the design, while also informing the development of practical guidelines (Reeves, Herrington and Oliver, 2005). This paper reports on findings from a project funded by the Australian Government Office for Learning and Teac hing, which aimed to develop a CPS framework and supporting online system to scaffold teachers and students through a creative problem solving approach founded on the principles of DBR. The study employed a mixed‑methods DBR approach involving multiple it erations to design, develop, trial and implement the framework and tool, as well as the development of principles and practical guidelines for application in the classroom. The findings reported in this paper focus on the DBR process and the experience tr ialling the CPS tool in a first‑year undergraduate course offered in the School of Communication, International Studies and Languages at the University of South Australia. The paper reports on the implications of the findings from the project and the bene fits of DBR as a methodology informing the design, development

 

Keywords: Keywords: Creativity, Creative Problem Solving, Design-Based Research, Higher Education, Graduate Attributes, Generic Skills

 

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Journal Article

An Approach to Scoring Collaboration in Online Game Environments  pp335-342

Claire Scoular, Esther Care, Nafisa Awwal

© Aug 2017 Volume 15 Issue 4, Editor: Elizabeth Boyle and Thomas Connolly, pp281 - 366

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Abstract

With technological advances, it is now possible to use games to capture information‑rich behaviours that reveal processes by which players interact and solve problems. Recent problem‑based games have been designed to assess and record detailed interactions between the problem solver and the game environment, and thereby capture salient solution processes in an unobtrusive way (Zoanetti, 2010; Bennett et al., 2003; Shute & Wang, 2009). The Assessment and Teaching of 21st Century Skills project used an innovative approach to capture these processes through responses (activities and communication patterns) within collaborative games (Griffin & Care, 2015). Game player response patterns are identified as behaviours that are indicative of skills and are captured in real‑time game play within time‑structured log files. The analysis of these log files allows for inferences to be drawn in regard to the efficiency and quality of player performance. A concern with this approach is that game development for this purpose is complex, time consuming and expensive, with unique scoring applied to each game. This paper presents another approach that identifies, across games, common behaviours. A systematic scoring system for assessing player behaviours in games could provide access to useful data not only from new games but from existing games. This paper presents such an approach using collaborative games situated in a problem‑solving context.

 

Keywords: Collaboration, problem solving, online assessment, log stream data, measurement, e-learning

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 15 Issue 4 / Aug 2017  pp281‑366

Editor: Elizabeth Boyle, Thomas Connolly

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Editorial

 

Keywords: Sign Language; American Sign Language; Recognition System; Kinect; Expert System; Game-Based Learning; Knowledge Engineering, Visual programming, Education, Computational thinking, K-12, Lightbot, Scratch, Microgames, learning, gender, culture, Multiple intelligences; Game preferences; Game mechanics; Evidence-based; Game design; Learning games, Collaboration, problem solving, online assessment, log stream data, measurement, e-learning, Educational Video Games; TAM (Technology Acceptance Model); Higher Education; Behavioural intention; Age

 

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