The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

Lecture Recording: Structural and Symbolic Information vs. Flexibility of Presentation  pp219-226

Daniel Stolzenberg, Stefan Pforte

© Dec 2007 Volume 5 Issue 3, ICEL 2007, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp173 - 250

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Abstract

Rapid eLearning is an ongoing trend which enables flexible and cost‑effective creation of learning materials. Especially, lecture recording has turned out to be a lightweight method particularly suited for existing lectures and blended learning strategies. In order to not only sequentially playback but offer full fledged navigation, search and inspection of the recorded lecture, chapter marks and search indices have to be embedded. To solve this, two basic approaches for lecture recording tools can be identified — both of them having certain advantages and drawbacks. On the one hand there are systems based on symbolic representation of common slideshow formats like MS PowerPoint. Therefore, they preserve structure and symbol information contained therein, but are lacking flexibility of supported dynamic and interactive formats. On the other hand there are systems based on pixel representation and screen grabbing technologies. While supporting any presentation content, structural and symbolic information cannot be extracted directly and thus has to be post‑processed from the recorded video. This paper discusses a perspective of combining these approaches by widening the slide‑metaphor to a more flexible scene‑based presentation, preserving both the structural and symbolic information. One possible attempt for this is identified by introducing a browser‑based scene concept. Symbolic information can be directly extracted from the XHTML source code and structural information derives from switching through scenes. The browser itself is capable of presenting a wide range of dynamic and interactive formats, thus offering more flexible presentations. For approving the proposed concepts, a prototype called "Virtual Overhead" was developed and evaluated.

 

Keywords: rapid e-learning, lecture recording, lightweight content production, browser interactivity

 

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Journal Article

Copycat or Creative Innovator? Reproduction as a Pedagogical Strategy in Schools  pp83-93

Stine Ejsing-Duun, Helle Marie Skovbjerg

© Jan 2016 Volume 14 Issue 2, ECGBL 2015, Editor: Robin Munkvold, pp81 - 149

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Abstract

Abstract: This article explores how student behaviour and interactions change when teachers use producing as a primary pedagogical strategy (Papert, 1980; Ejsing‑Duun and Karoff, 2014). Based on observed student and teacher actions and responses, as w ell as students production, this paper emphasizes the importance of understanding how students explore creativity and playfulness while producing in learning situations. This paper is based on a large research project called Children as Learning Designe rs in a Digital School (2013…2015), funded by Denmarks Ministry of Education, which included fieldwork in five Danish public schools, involved about 500 students, and comprised six interventions in the first, second, fifth, sixth, and tenth grades. Th e projects empirical data consist of observations, participatory observation, and productions students created during the interventions. This paper presents an analysis of how students were creative and playful while producing learning material as games during three of the projects interventions. The study is based on a specific understanding of the creativity with a point of departure (Boden, 2004; Tanggaard and Wegener, 2015) and playfulness (Karoff, 2013) that occur in learning situations. We app roach creativity and playfulness as new methods of learning, through six areas of change that inform [ƒ]how todays kids play and learn, and, more generally, how they see themselves, relate to others, dwell in place, and treat things (Ackermann, 2013: 119). This paper investigates how educators handle childrens productive processes in a school setting and how teachers can conceptualize and nurture play and creativity as drivers for learning. In this context, the importance of skills and acknowledgeme nt of reproducing and re‑mixing existing materials is discussed. We further argue that playfulness is necessary for creativity to occur. From this point of view, it is possible to understand how learning activities can support creativity„an essential twen ty‑first century skill (Levinsen and Sørensen, 2015).

 

Keywords: Keywords:, re-, production, creativity, innovation, playing, learning, games

 

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Journal Article

Do Authors of Online Electronic Materials for Teaching Mathematics use Their Potential to use Non‑Stereotypical Cultural Settings?  pp235-243

Hana Moraová

© Jun 2017 Volume 15 Issue 3, Editor: Jarmila Novotná and Antonín Jančařík, pp199 - 280

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Abstract

The paper focuses on the cultural content of online electronic materials developed primarily by Czech in‑service teachers of mathematics for smartboards. The author presents an analysis of these materials with a focus on the cultural settings of word problems they contain. The paper builds on a poster presented on ECEL 2015 conference and a paper presented on ECEL 2016 conference. The question the author asks is how innovative electronic materials are as far as their cultural, non‑mathematical content is concerned. Are these materials a mere conversion of problems from traditional hardcopy textbooks or have its authors gone further, introducing new motives, images and realities? Do they use the potential of the online environment that allows easy updates (unlike hardcopy textbooks that are used without any change for years, even decades)? The author builds on her research in the area of non‑mathematical content of mathematics textbooks (Moraová, 2013) and of problems posed by teacher trainees (Moraová, 2014). The here presented research combines qualitative and quantitative approaches. The author analyses one hundred and seventeen online activities from the website www.veskole.cz. Word problems are classified according to their cultural content and the most frequent images are described and commented upon. The findings of this study are of interest to in‑service mathematics teachers planning to develop an online teaching unit, mathematics educators but also policy makers as not much attention is paid to the cultural contents of mathematics teaching materials.

 

Keywords: Textbooks, electronic online materials, word problems, non-mathematical content, subversiveness, realia, stereotypes, construction of social reality, culture reproduction

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 15 Issue 3 / Jun 2017  pp199‑280

Editor: Jarmila Novotná, Antonín Jančařík

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Editorial

 

Keywords: Note-taking, reflection, self-efficacy, student's characteristics, correlation analysis, causal analysis, e-advising, reflection, reflective practitioners, trust, competency, Inquiry Based Learning, GIS education, spatial analysis, Blended Learning, Textbooks, electronic online materials, word problems, non-mathematical content, subversiveness, realia, stereotypes, construction of social reality, culture reproduction, models, projection, science education, 3D projections, interactive models, science education, biology, teacher technological pedagogical knowledge, 21st-century skills, low-technology context, teacher transition to e-learning, technology integration, professional networks, Tunisia

 

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