The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

Games as a Platform for Student Participation in Authentic Scientific Research  pp259-270

Rikke Magnussen, Sidse Damgaard Hansen, Tilo Planke, Jacob Friis Sherson

© Jun 2014 Volume 12 Issue 3, Special Edition for ECGBL 2013, Editor: Carlos Vaz de Carvalho and Paula Escudeiro, pp227 - 311

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Abstract

Abstract: This paper presents results from the design and testing of an educational version of Quantum Moves, a Scientific Discovery Game that allows players to help solve authentic scientific challenges in the effort to develop a quantum computer. The pr imary aim of developing a game‑based platform for student‑research collaboration is to investigate if and how this type of game concept can strengthen authentic experimental practice and the creation of new knowledge in science education. Researchers and game developers tested the game in three separate high school classes (Class 1, 2, and 3). The tests were documented using video observations of students playing the game, qualitative interviews, and qualitative and quantitative questionnaires. The fo cus of the tests has been to study players' motivation and their experience of learning through participation in authentic scientific inquiry. In questionnaires conducted in the two first test classes students found that the aspects of doing real scient ific researchŽ and solving physics problems were the more interesting aspects of playing the game. However, designing a game that facilitates professional research collaboration while simultaneously introducing quantum physics to high school students prov ed to be a challenge. A collaborative learning design was implemented in Class 3, where students were given expert roles such as experimental and theoretical physicists. This significantly improved the students feeling of learning physics compared to Cla ss 1 and 2. Overall the results presented in this paper indicate that the possibility of participating in authentic scientific experiments, which this class of games opens, is highly motivating for students. The findings also show that the learning desig n in the class setting must be considered in order to improve the students experience of learning and that various design challenges remain to be addressed even further.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Scientific discovery games, science education, learning games, game-based learning

 

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Journal Article

Affordances of Educational Learning Technologies in Higher Education Multicultural Environments Multicultural Learning Environments  pp217-227

Edilson Arenas

© Apr 2015 Volume 13 Issue 4, ECEL 2014, Editor: Kim Long, pp205 - 315

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Abstract

Abstract: A raft of studies have been undertakencluster of research has been conducted in higher education to investigate the action possibilitiesaffordances (action possibilities) and the influence information and communication technologies (ICT) may have onin students learning experiences and outcomes. Such studies have given rise to the implementation of a wide range of educational frameworks with a great deal of empirical evidence on the benefits of using technologies to improve learning. However , these benefits do not appear to have fulfilled higher education expectations for more meaningful and transformative learning experiences. In this paper, I argue that part of the problem is either the content or teacher…centric perspective of these frame works and the need to explore the benefits from a more student…centric perspective. Learning is contextual, with learners having different abilities to learn and varying preferences for educational technologies with greater potential to facilitate their l earning activities. Drawing on an ethnographic study of culturally diverse computing students and teachers within learning environments that blend online and face‑to‑face pedagogies, I argue that, that our understanding of what ICT has to offer for the de sign and implementation of transformative learning activities is a far more complex issue than is often anticipated, particularly in the design and implementation of learning for computer science programs.

 

Keywords: Keywords: academic disciplines, computer science, computing science education, e-learning, ICT affordances, learners preferences, learning styles, learning technologies, media affordances, online learning

 

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Journal Article

Teaching Aids and Work With Models in e‑Learning Environments  pp244-258

Kateřina Jančaříková, Antonín Jančařík

© Jun 2017 Volume 15 Issue 3, Editor: Jarmila Novotná and Antonín Jančařík, pp199 - 280

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Abstract

PISA study has defined several key areas to be paid attention to by teachers. One of these areas is work with models. The term model can be understood very broadly, it can refer to a drawing of a chemical reaction, a plastic model, a permanent mount (taxidermy) to advanced 3D projections. Teachers are no longer confined to teaching materials and aids available physically at schools. Thanks to information technology, models can be included in lessons almost without any limits. However, work with models is very specific due to the simple fact that a model always differs from what it represents. Efficiency of education using ICT can be affected negatively in case that work with complex models requires high level of abstraction which pupils are not capable of (Harrison and Treagust, 2000). Jančaříková (2015) points out that – due to the demands on upper secondary pupils – children must be taught how to relate models to real objects from very early stages. Linking an object to its model – isomorphism is the basis for successful work with models. Work with models thus must be developed systematically and consistently and included into teaching of younger learners. The scope of work with models in natural sciences is gradually increasing. However, the fact that we are able to project models to pupils using information technology does not mean that pupils will be able to understand them. In this paper we want to point out that not enough attention is paid to work with models (not only in the Czech Republic) – methodology of work with models does not exist and is not taught to pre‑service teachers. The paper classifies types of models we come across in lessons, describes basic differences between objects and reality they represent and proposes possible ways of systematic inclusion of models into teaching.

 

Keywords: models, projection, science education, 3D projections, interactive models, science education, biology

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 15 Issue 3 / Jun 2017  pp199‑280

Editor: Jarmila Novotná, Antonín Jančařík

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Editorial

 

Keywords: Note-taking, reflection, self-efficacy, student's characteristics, correlation analysis, causal analysis, e-advising, reflection, reflective practitioners, trust, competency, Inquiry Based Learning, GIS education, spatial analysis, Blended Learning, Textbooks, electronic online materials, word problems, non-mathematical content, subversiveness, realia, stereotypes, construction of social reality, culture reproduction, models, projection, science education, 3D projections, interactive models, science education, biology, teacher technological pedagogical knowledge, 21st-century skills, low-technology context, teacher transition to e-learning, technology integration, professional networks, Tunisia

 

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