The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
For general enquiries email administrator@ejel.org
Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop

Information about the current European Conference on e-Learning is available here

For infomation on the International Conference on eLearning, click here

For infomation on the European Conference on Games Based Learning clickhere

 

Journal Article

iSELF: The development of an Internet‑Tool for Self‑Evaluation and Learner Feedback  pp313-325

Nicolet Theunissen, Hester Stubb

© Jul 2014 Volume 12 Issue 4, Editor: Dr Rikke Ørngreen and Dr Karin Tweddell Levinsen, pp313 - 410

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: This paper describes the theoretical basis and development of the iSELF: an Internet‑tool for Self‑Evaluation and Learner Feedback to stimulate self‑directed learning in ubiquitous learning environments. In ubiquitous learning, learners follow t heir own trails of interest, scaffolded by coaches, peers and tools for thinking and learning. Ubiquitous learning solutions include on‑ and off‑line, formal and informal learning. To benefit from its possibilities, learners need to develop competencies f or self‑directed learning. To do so, a self‑evaluation tool can help the learner to get insight in his/her own development, to manage and monitor his/her own learning process, to collaborate in learning, to relate the learning to 'real life' needs, and to take control over educational decisions. The iSELF was developed in an iterative process, complying to the following high level requirements: (1) Enabling learning anytime, anywhere; (2) Supporting self‑directed learning; (3) Evaluating learner, le arning solutions and job‑needs; (4) Assessing learner competencies; (5) Using card‑sort method for questionnaires; (6) Facilitating questionnaires 'under construction'; and (7) User‑friendly design. The resulting online tool contained a card‑sort module, looking somewhat like a 'solitaire' game, a profile module to evaluate core competencies, and a feedback module to suggest learning possibilities. For illustration, 14 different studies that contributed to the development of iSELF and to the devel opment of self‑evaluation questionnaires compliant to iSELF, are briefly discussed. These illustrative studies included various populations: e.g. students, employees from small and medium enterprises, crisis management organizations, and the military. Use fulness and usability of the self‑evaluation tool were valued positively. The iSELF contributes to an adaptive ubiquitous learning environment in which the learner can make the educational decisions according to self‑directed learning principles. The iSEL F will stimulate self‑directed learning in a ubiquitous le

 

Keywords: Keywords: self-evaluation, self-assessment, internet-tool, ubiquitous learning, self-directed learning, feedback

 

Share |

Journal Article

Assessment in Massive Open Online Courses  pp207-216

Wilfried Admiraal, Bart Huisman, Olga Pilli

© Apr 2015 Volume 13 Issue 4, ECEL 2014, Editor: Kim Long, pp205 - 315

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: Open online distance learning in higher education has quickly gained popularity, expanded, and evolved, with Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) as the most recent development. New web technologies allow for scalable ways to deliver video lect ure content, implement social forums and track student progress in MOOCs. However, we remain limited in our ability to assess complex and open‑ended student assignments. In this paper, we present a study on various forms of assessment and their relationsh ip with the final exam score. In general, the reliability of both the self‑assessments and the peer assessments was high. Based on low correlations with final exam grades as well as with other assessment forms, we conclude that self‑assessments might not be a valid way to assess students performance in MOOCs. Yet the weekly quizzes and peer assessment significantly explained differences in students final exam scores, with one of the weekly quizzes as the strongest explanatory variable. We suggest that both self‑assessment and peer assessment would better be used as assessment for learning instead of assessment of learning. Future research on MOOCs implies a reconceptualization of education variables, including the role of assessment of students achiev ements.

 

Keywords: Keywords: MOOC, Open Online Learning, Higher education, Assessment, Peer assessment, Self-assessment, Quiz

 

Share |