The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

Reinventing Papert's Constructionism — Boosting Young Children's Writing Skills with e‑Learning Designed for Dyslexics  pp227-234

Karin Tweddell Levinsen

© Nov 2008 Volume 6 Issue 3, Editor: Shirley Williams, Laura Czerniewicz, pp161 - 254

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Abstract

Since the consent to the Salamanca Statement on special needs education from 1994, e‑learning developers have focused on tools aimed to support dyslexic learners. The importance of these efforts is on display every year in the Special Aids exhibition area at the BETT‑event in London. ICT and e‑learning is now widely used in the special needs education for dyslexics. However, the Salamanca Statement also inspired the vision of The Spacious School and the idea that children with learning disabilities should be transferred from special classes and included in the ordinary classes in primary schools. In the beginning of this process, the children with special needs were present in the classroom with their compensational aid, e.g. e‑learning, ICT and special teacher support, and they were rarely included in the socially organised learning activities. Consequently, class teachers and subject teachers were not aware of the existence and potentials of the special compensational e‑learning and ICT tools. In recent years in Denmark, ICT has changed from being present in schools to becoming an available, everyday resource. That is, ICT and computers move out of the computer rooms and into every school room. I.e. most pupils use ICT, e‑learning and computers in various contexts whenever it seems convenient. The increasing use of ICT in schools has paved the way for new ways of including the children with special educational needs and while knowledge of dyslexic compensational e‑learning and ICT tools was earlier restricted to the special teachers, teachers in general have now become aware of the existence of these tools. Within the frame of a large scale research project in primary schools in Denmark (Project IT and Learning — PIL), this change of awareness led to teacher‑initiated experiments with the Danish e‑learning special needs‑software CD Ord in first and second grades. The teachers wanted to see whether these tools could inspire normal children as well as children with special educational needs to start writing their own stories. The paper presents the research findings from the empirical studies of experiments in Second grade. The paper concludes that most children in the experiments wrote longer and more complex stories than normally expected from this age‑group. The children with a visual learning style in particular demonstrated a significant progress.

 

Keywords: e-learning, writing skills, reading skills, storytelling, dyslexics, special needs, constructionism

 

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Journal Article

Using Digital Counterstories as Multimodal Pedagogy among South African Pre‑service Student Educators to produce Stories of Resistance  pp29-42

Daniela Gachago et al

© Feb 2014 Volume 12 Issue 1, ICEL2013, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 125

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Abstract

Abstract: While digital storytelling has entered higher education as a vehicle to reflect on issues of identity and difference, there is a paucity of research framed by a critical perspective unpacking underlying power structures in the classroom. This st udy reports on an ongoing project in a South African pre‑service Teacher Education course in which final‑year students reflected in the form of digital stories on the notion of difference and how it affected their journey to becoming a teacher. Drawing o n theories of resistance, counterstorytelling and multimodality, five of these digital stories, students⠒ reflective essays and discussions in a focus group were analysed to investigate types of resistance in students⠒ narratives, their perceptions of the functions of counterstorytelling, and what multimodal analysis of these stories could tell us about the relationship of students⠒ identities, their choice of modes and their learning. Results of the study showed students⠒ intent to develop so‑cal led â counterstories⠒, defined as stories that challenge social and racial injustice, which are usually not heard in education. Students also perceived telling of counterstories as useful to building communities among marginalised students, acting as m odel stories, providing an alternative window into the world of students of colour and a space for healing. While only one story could be defined as portraying â transformational resistance⠒, carrying the highest potential for social change, others wer e important documents of disadvantaged students⠒ fight for survival, and might well challenge some of the existing power structures in their classroom. Multimodal analysis of the stories revealed contradictory elements, highlighting the difficulty for s tudents to resist dominant discourses, but also showing the increasing (conscious or unconscious) emotional audience manipulation evidenced in production of digital stories by the more privileged students. We suggest that engaging students in multimodal analysis of their own stories could facilita

 

Keywords: Keywords: digital storytelling, counterstories, multimodal pedagogy, multimodal discourse analysis, social justice education, higher education, South Africa

 

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Journal Article

Dynamic Pervasive Storytelling in Long Lasting Learning Games  pp192-206

Trygve Pløhn, Sandy Louchart, Trond Aalberg

© Mar 2015 Volume 13 Issue 3, ECGBL 2014, Editor: Busch-Steinicke, pp149 - 206

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Abstract

Abstract: Pervasive gaming is a reality‑based gaming genre originating from alternative theatrical forms in which the performance becomes a part of the players⠒ everyday life. In recent years much research has been done on pervasive gaming (Benford et al. 2005, Cheok et al. 2006, Jegers and Wiberg 2006) and its potential applications towards specific domains. Pervasive games have been effective with regards to advertising (VG 2009), education (Pløhn 2013) and social relationship building (Pløhn and Aalberg 2013). In pervasive games that take place over a long period of time, i.e. days or weeks, an important success criterion is to provide features that support in‑game awareness and increases the pervasiveness of the game according to the playe rs⠒ everyday life. However, given the nature of pervasive games, they also pose challenges when compared to more traditional gaming approaches, namely; 1) How can one make the game pervasive according to the players⠒ everyday life? and 2) How can on e support in‑game awareness?. This paper presents a Dynamic Pervasive Storytelling (DPS) approach and describes the design of the pervasive game Nuclear Mayhem (NM), a pervasive game designed to support a Web‑games development course at the Nord‑Trøn delag University College, Norway. NM ran parallel with the course and lasted for nine weeks and needed specific features both to become a part of the players⠒ everyday life and to remind the players about the ongoing game. DPS, as a model, is oriented t owards increasing the pervasiveness of the game and supporting a continuous level of player in‑game awareness through the use of real life events (RLE). DPS uses RLE as building blocks both to create the overall game story prior to the start of the game by incorporating elements of current affairs in its design and during the unfolding of the game as a mean to increase the pervasiveness and in‑game awareness of the experience. The paper concludes that DPS is a promising approach for creating a game stor y which increases the pervasiveness of the game and supports

 

Keywords: Keywords: pervasive games, game based learning, in-game awareness, interactive storytelling, media analysis, game mastering

 

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Journal Article

Better Learning of Chinese Idioms through Storytelling: Current Trend of Multimedia Storytelling  pp455-466

Ee Hui Li, Soon Hin Hew

© Oct 2017 Volume 15 Issue 5, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Karin Levinsen, pp367 - 466

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Abstract

Storytelling plays a vital role to impart a nation’s tradition, cultural beliefs and history to future generation. It is frequently used for the purpose of sharing or exchanging information as it enables the messages to be conveyed to the audience easily. Storytelling acts as a tool of human social interaction and is commonly used in education for learning, explaining and entertaining. Due to the learning effectiveness brought up by storytelling, this study is aimed to compare and differentiate the feasibility of traditional storytelling and multimedia storytelling in motivating and leveraging the non‑native novices’ learning of Chinese idioms. A total of 83 non‑native novices who have attended the Chinese as Foreign Language Course in a local private university of Malaysia were selected as the research sample and divided into two groups. 43 participants were placed in the experimental group and studied the Chinese idioms with a developed multimedia storytelling prototype (MSP), whereas the other 40 participants in the conventional teaching group learned the new knowledge through traditional storytelling. A Chinese idiom test and survey questionnaires were distributed to the non‑native novices to examine their learning achievement and preferences towards the learning approaches. Results showed that the students in the experimental group scored higher and had greater satisfaction towards the Chinese idiom learning than the learners from the conventional group.

 

Keywords: multimedia storytelling; traditional storytelling; foreign language learning; Chinese idiom learning; non-native novices

 

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Journal Article

Pervasive Learning … Using Games to Tear Down the Classroom Walls  pp299-311

Trygve Pløhn

© Jun 2014 Volume 12 Issue 3, Special Edition for ECGBL 2013, Editor: Carlos Vaz de Carvalho and Paula Escudeiro, pp227 - 311

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Abstract

Abstract: Pervasive gaming is a new and emerging gaming genre where the physical and social aspects of the real world are integrated into the game and blends into the players everyday life. Given the nature of pervasive games, it may be possible to use t hat type of game as a tool to support learning in a university course by providing a gameplay where the students, by playing the game, expands the area of learning beyond the lecture hall and lectures and into the students everyday life. If this is possib le, the area for learning will also become pervasive and be everywhere and anywhere at any time. To address this research area, a prototype of a playable pervasive game to support learning in university studies has been designed. This paper presents the e xperimental pervasive game Nuclear Mayhem and how the game was designed to be pervasive and support the curriculum of the course. Analysis of log files showed that 87% of the logins in the game client was done outside of the time period that was allocated to lectures and lab exercises and that logins where registered in all the 24 hours of a day. These numbers indicate that the game became pervasive and a part of the students/players everyday life. Interviews with the players indicate that they found the game exciting and fun to play, but that the academic tasks and riddles that they had to solve during the game were too easy to solve. The paper concludes that games such as Nuclear Mayhem are promising tools to support learning and transform the area for learning to become pervasive relative to the players everyday life and suggest improvements in the game for the next versions.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Pervasive games, Education, Serious gaming, Pervasive learning, Game based learning, Dynamic storytelling

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 15 Issue 5 / Oct 2017  pp367‑466

Editor: Rikke Ørngreen, Karin Levinsen

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Editorial

 

Keywords: Open Teaching; Open Educational Practices; Open Educational Resources; MOOC; Information and Communication Technologies; Open Education; E-learning, E-Resources, e-learning, open and distance education, pre-service teachers, e-Learning practice, continuum, use, e-Teaching, e-Learning, traditional, innovation, systems engineering, systems thinking, systems approach, system dynamics, systems engineering education, systems thinking assessment, educational games, experience accelerator, experiential learning, game-based learning, system analysis and design, systems engineering and theory, simulation, Feasibility, e-learning, Iranian university, strategies, gamification, games and learning, drivers, barriers, teachers, Higher Education, connectivity, subject advisor, integration, curriculum delivery, 21st Century, South Africa, multimedia storytelling; traditional storytelling; foreign language learning; Chinese idiom learning; non-native novices

 

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