The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

Student Response (clicker) Systems: Preferences of Biomedical Physiology Students in Asian classes  pp347-356

Isabel Hwang, Kevin Wong, Shun Leung Lam, Paul Lam

© Oct 2015 Volume 13 Issue 5, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Karin Levinsen, pp317 - 445

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Abstract

Abstract: Student response systems (commonly called clickers) are valuable tools for engaging students in classroom interactions. In this study, we investigated the use of two types of response systems (a traditional clicker and a mobile device) by stud

 

Keywords: Keywords: Web-based response system, clickers, student perception, human physiology, classroom interaction

 

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Journal Article

Effects of Video Discussion Posts on Social Presence and Course Satisfaction  pp449-459

Ying Xiu, Penny Thompson

© Oct 2020 Volume 18 Issue 5, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen, Mie Buhl and Bente Meyer, pp373 - 459

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Abstract

Video is a rich medium that conveys more social cues than text. Use of video in an online discussion forum therefore has the potential to increase social presence in online learning environments. This experimental study compared a group using video for a portion of the required discussion posts to a group using only text in an online undergraduate course. While there was a correlation between perceived social presence and satisfaction with the course, there were no significant differences in perceived social presence or course satisfaction between the two groups. Open‑ended comments revealed a mix of positive and negative reactions to the use of video. This study highlights the need for continuing research on the use of video in online discussion forums to assess the benefits of video relative to its possible negative effect on “anytime, anywhere” flexibility

 

Keywords: Video Discussion Posts, Student Perceptions, Social Presence, Course Satisfaction, Online Learning

 

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