The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

A Case Study on the Adoption and use of Synchronous Virtual Classrooms  pp124-138

Florence Martin, Michele Parker, Beth Allred Oyarzun

© Jun 2013 Volume 11 Issue 2, Editor: Roy Williams, pp80 - 167

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Abstract

This is a case study of faculty adoption and use of Horizon Wimba Virtual Classroom in online courses at a Southeastern University in the United States.. The purpose of this case study was to explore faculty adoption and use of Horizon Wimba in their online courses. This inquiry is based on Yen et al. (2010) adoption factors (organizational, social, personal and technological) and the features of the virtual classroom. The research questions are 1) What factors and features influence faculty adoption of the Wimba Virtual Classroom? 2) How do faculty rate the Wimba Virtual Classroom using the characteristics of innovation? 3) How do faculty classify themselves using Roger’s model of diffusion of innovation? 4) How do faculty use the Wimba Virtual Classroom in their teaching? Roger’s diffusion of innovation was used as the theoretical framework for faculty adoption of virtual classroom. In the Fall of 2010, faculty were surveyed and interviewed about their decision to adopt and use Wimba. This case study provides meaningful information for administrators interested in promoting technology enhanced learning on their campuses and for faculty considering adoption.

 

Keywords: virtual classroom, synchronous, online learning, technology adoption

 

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Journal Article

Pedagogical Approaches and Technical Subject Teaching through Internet Media  pp52-65

Olubodun Olufemi

© Mar 2008 Volume 6 Issue 1, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 75

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Abstract

This is a comparison of Instructivist and constructivist pedagogical approaches and their applications in different situations, which make clear the comparative advantages of both approaches. Instructivist learning, places the teacher in authority while the constructivist shifted authority to no one in particular but shared responsibilities between learner and teacher in such a manner that the teacher no longer assumes the responsibilities of the passage of informationknowledge to the learner but only guides him to discover the 'objective truth' out there and in the attainment of learning objectives. Teaching and Learning process was redefined in the light of 'new' understanding in teaching and learning and practical applications of these pedagogical approaches were considered. I presented a study guide (Appendix 1) as an example of socio‑constructivist pedagogy where emphasis in on learning rather than on teaching.

 

Keywords: Study guide, e-learning, pedagogy, socio-constructivism, test, evaluation, LMS, virtual classroom, asynchronous, instructivism, construction technique

 

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Journal Article

Students’ use of Asynchronous Voice Discussion in a Blended‑Learning Environment: A study of two undergraduate classes  pp360-367

Khe Foon Hew, Wing Sum Cheung

© Oct 2012 Volume 10 Issue 4, ICEL 2012, Editor: Paul Lam, pp360 - 440

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Abstract

Contemporary discussions of education in blended‑learning environments increasingly emphasize the social nature of learning which emphasizes interactions among students, or among students and instructors. These interactions can occur asynchronously using a text based discussion forum. A text‑based discussion forum, however, may not work well for all participants as some find it difficult to explain complex concepts in words, while others complain of being misunderstood due to the absence of verbal cues. In this study, we investigated the use of a Wimba Voice Board to support asynchronous voice discussion. A quasi‑experiment research design involving two classes of undergraduate students was conducted. One of the classes (n = 24 students) used the Wimba Voice Board while the other (n = 18 students) used a text discussion forum in BlackBoard. The results of an independent t‑test analysis suggested that there was no significant difference in the students’ degree of participation in the two classes, asynchronous voice discuss class (M = 2.92, SD = 1.586) and text discussion class (M = 2.78, SD = 1.353), (t = 0.299, df = 40, p = 0.767) at the 0.05 level of significance. However, the online discussion appeared to be more sustained in the asynchronous voice discussion group. Analyses of the students’ reflection data suggested that asynchronous voice discussion have several advantages over text forums. Specifically, an asynchronous voice discussion: enables students to understand one another’s messages better, allows students, who prefer speaking to writing, or students who are not proficient in written English, to participate in the discussion, promotes originality of students’ ideas, and helps to foster a sense of online community.

 

Keywords: blended-learning, asynchronous online discussion, voice board, discussion forum, participation, Wimba Voice Board

 

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Journal Article

The use of templates to manage on‑line discussion forums  pp12-19

Shafqat Ali, Graeme Salter

© Jan 2004 Volume 2 Issue 1, Special Issue for ECEL 2003, Editor: Roy Williams, pp1 - 239

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Abstract

 

Keywords: Collaboration, Discussion Forum, CMC, Asynchronous Communication, e-Learning, Higher Education, Templates, Collaborative Learning

 

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Journal Article

Sage on the Stage in the Digital Age: The Role of Online Lecture in Distance Learning  pp1-14

Q B. Chung

© Jan 2005 Volume 3 Issue 1, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 81

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Abstract

The Internet can be a useful tool that can enhance interactivity in classes. Accordingly, offering distance learning courses using the Web, especially in the asynchronous mode for the additional flexibility of time, is becoming an established practice in higher education. Web‑based distance learning comes with numerous benefits, but not without worries for potentials deficiencies. One such deficiency in the current distance learning framework is the lack of lecture, the most relied‑upon and proven means o f instruction in the traditional classroom settings. This paper raises an issue of the lack of lectures in Web‑based distance learning, and proposes that streaming video take the role of online lecture in that setting. Described in this paper are the rati onale to put the lecture back into e‑learning in higher education, two case studies in which the steps were taken to implement the proposed method, and the feedback from the students who took such courses in the undergraduate business curriculum and the M BA program.

 

Keywords: : Web-based education, Asynchronous learning, e-Learning in Higher Education, Sage on the Stage, Guide on the Side, Online Lecture

 

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Journal Article

Teaching Scientific/Academic Writing in the Digital Age  pp43-54

Arna Peretz

© Jan 2005 Volume 3 Issue 1, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 81

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Abstract

This paper describes a graduate‑level scientific/academic writing course for non‑native speakers (NNS) of English at Ben‑Gurion University of the Negev (BGU), Israel, which is taught in a technology‑enhanced or blended learning environment. The use and integration of electronic discourses, such as email and Powerpoint, on‑screen marking techniques, and submission of written assignments and writing consultancies by email, and asynchronous online discussion forums are described. Features of the HighLearn course‑supporting WEB site, which enable the integration of discussion forums into the writing course, are explained. Results of teacher‑initiated student evaluations and advantages and dilemmas of teaching scientific/academic writing in the digital age are discussed. The paper concludes with recommendations for future research and suggestions for the further integration of ICT in the scientific/academic writing course.

 

Keywords: scientificacademic writing, technology-enhanced learning, CMC/ICT, e-learning, asynchronous discussion forums, EFL

 

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Journal Article

The relationship between an Online Synchronous Learning Environment and Knowledge Acquisition Skills and Traits: The Blackboard Collaborate Experience  pp204-222

John Politis, Denis Politis

© Jul 2016 Volume 14 Issue 3, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Karin Levinsen, pp150 - 232

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Abstract

Abstract: Online learning is becoming more attractive to perspective students because it offers them greater accessibility, convenience and flexibility to study at a reduced cost. While these benefits may attract prospective learners to embark on an onlin e learning environment there remains little empirical evidence relating the skills and traits of knowledge acquisition with a synchronous online environment supported by Blackboard Collaborate. Without understanding this relationship colleges and universi ties cannot assess if their programs offered through educational communication technologies, such as Blackboard, enhance learner⠒s skills and traits that are essential for knowledge acquisition. The purpose of this paper is to (i) examine the relatio nship between an online learning environment, which is supported by Blackboard Collaborate, and the skills and traits of knowledge acquisition, (ii) assess the influence of online learners motivation on knowledge acquisition skills and traits, and (iii ) propose alternative Blackboard Collaborate layout and structure derived from the process of a critical reflection. Data was collected from 84 learners who studied online courses in a Higher Education Institution in the United Arab Emirates. The Analys is of Moment Structures (AMOS) was employed to perform the path analysis and SPSS was used to determine the factor structure of the examined variables. The study revealed three major findings. First, easy access of the Blackboard Collaborate and an effe ctively designed structure enhanced learners⠒ problem understanding and communication. It also improved the personal traits of conceptualisation, tolerance and amiability that are essential for knowledge acquisition. Second, the readiness of the online learners with educational communication technologies had a positive influence on their liberal arts knowledge. Third, learners⠒ attested motivation to embark on synchronous online classes enhanced their knowledge acquisition skills and traits. Finally, alternative Blackboard Collaborate layouts and struc

 

Keywords: Keywords: Blackboard collaborate, e-learners, online learning, knowledge acquisition, synchronous

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 11 Issue 2 / Jun 2013  pp80‑167

Editor: Roy Williams

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Keywords: online learning; professional development; perceived usefulness of technology; perceived ease of use of technology; online qualifications, pre-service teacher education; secondary school teachers; technology uses in education; teaching methods, weblogs, blogs, e-learning; online assessment; adaptive assessment; learning management systems; web-based systems; ancient Greek literature; Greek lyric poetry, action research, reflective practitioner, social networking technologies, continuous professional development, virtual classroom, synchronous, online learning, technology adoption, e-cheating, turnitin.com, writecheck.com, plagiarism, face-to-face, online, virtual worlds, LMS, sloodle

 

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