The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

Editorial for EJEL Volume 11 Issue 2  pp80-81

Roy Williams

© Jun 2013 Volume 11 Issue 2, Editor: Roy Williams, pp80 - 167

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Abstract

The articles in this issue demonstrate the widening range of possibilities for e‑learning. The technologies continue to develop and change, and issues of adoption and innovation persist. Like any other technologies, e‑learning hardware and software is best used when it is introduced to solve a real problem which has been carefully thought through. The articles show that there is tremendous promise and opportunity, but there are no quick fixes, and no one‑size‑fits all solutions.

 

Keywords: online learning, blogs in teacher training, reluctant to adopt technology, e-assessment tool

 

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Journal Article

Blending the Community of Inquiry Framework with Learning by Design: Towards a Synthesis for Blended Learning in Teacher Training  pp183-194

Katerina Makri, Kyparisia Papanikolaou, Athanasia Tsakiri et al

© May 2014 Volume 12 Issue 2, ECEL, Editor: Mélanie Ciussi, pp126 - 226

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Abstract

Abstract: As e‑learning is evolving into a mainstream, widespread practice, adopted by higher education institutions worldwide, much effort is geared towards the articulation of models and strategies for implementing e‑learning in formal education setting s. In the field of pre‑service teacher education, a rising challenge is to equip the ⠜21st century teacher⠀ with the necessary toolset of skills and competencies to grapple with the idiosyncrasies of the new generation of ⠜millenials⠀. To this pur pose, what still remains an open issue is the degree of innovation afforded by specific e‑learning designs, in a field where traditional teacher training pedagogies co‑exist with e‑learning‑specific ones. This article proposes a synthesis of two models, t he Community of Inquiry (COI) model, based on the Practical Inquiry model introduced by Garrison, Anderson, & Archer (2000) and the Learning by Design framework (LbyD), based on the conceptualization of â New Learning⠒, articulated by Kalantzis & Cope (2012). Both models were invented with new learning styles and circumstances in mind. The proposed synthesis guided the design of the six‑month introductory course in Technology Enhanced Learning by the School of Pedagogical and Technological Edu cation (ASPETE) research team (located in Athens) and implemented with 18 pre service student‑teachers at the Higher Education Technological Institute (TEI) of Lamia, located in another geographical area of Greece. In this context, elements of the C OI framework were employed as tools both for designing and for evaluating the contents, structure and activities of the e‑learning course. Two elements of the framework, teaching and cognitive presence were the axes supporting the course structure, whilst the kinds of activities most promoted were discussion, collaboration and reflection. The LbyD framework functioned as an awareness enhancement mechanism for trainee teachers to formulate, collaboratively negotiate and finally articulate and support pedag ogical scenarios integrating the meaningful use of technol

 

Keywords: Keywords: Community of Inquiry, blended learning, learning design, online teacher training, course design

 

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Journal Article

It Takes a Community to Develop a Teacher: Testing a New Teacher Education Model for Promoting ICT in Classroom Teaching Practices in Chile  pp237-249

Paula Charbonneau-Gowdy

© Apr 2015 Volume 13 Issue 4, ECEL 2014, Editor: Kim Long, pp205 - 315

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Abstract

Abstract: This paper is intended to adds to the emerging dialogue on best practices in teacher education for preparing future teachers to use technology to promote grounded theory‑based practices in their classrooms. In it, I report on an evolving model f or such training that resulted from a a longitudinal case study examiningning how changes to teacher trainees identities, learning and teaching practices changed when they are exposed to the use of a variety of social networking technologies for languag e learning in the context of their teacher preparation program in a private university in Chile. . The 12‑month classroom‑based case study was conducted at a private university in Chile, using a variety of ethnographic tools .… observation, interviews, an d online conversation analysis. I investigated how the integration of certain ICTstechnology into their content courses, as opposed to more traditional stand‑alone courses on technology use, mattered both in terms of the way the participants. The approach to technology used mattered both in terms of making a difference in the ways that these pre‑service teachers viewed themselves as learners and as future teachers of language, as well as of their evolving perspectives on the use of technology for learning and teaching. My aim in conducting the study was twofold: 1) to determine was twofold. First, I examined whether innovative technology‑ infused (TI) courses would serve to enable the beginning teacher participants to shed their traditional, passive, rather narrow cultural mindset as individuals and learners that are contrary to the identities of effective, 21st century teachers; and 2). Secondly, I sought to determine to see whether opportunities for these individuals to use a variety of innovative technologies for their own learning would have an influence on the pedagogies these individualsy themselves employed in their teaching practices. Would technology‑infused courses lead to teaching with technology? While the longitudinal study provided enc ouraging signs on both accounts within the teacher preparation program, questions remained about whether the model would be supported where it mattered … in real classroom teaching. In this article, I report on follow‑up acknowledging the challenges wit hin classroom‑based research and the complexities involved in social science‑based qualitative and numbers‑based findings that suggest that, generally, the positive changes were not sustained. These findings provide strong support for the need for teacher education models to be tested in real practice. Importantly, they also uncover the essential ingredient for promoting future teachers uptake of effective use of ICTs … collective support from the Teacher Education stakeholder community research para digms in drawing generalizable conclusions, the data analysis clearly confirms that there were encouraging signs for both aims for this particular group of pre‑service teachers. This study should be of interest to all stakeholders in education, most espe cially those whose responsibility it is and who may struggle with practical strategies to ensure that pre‑service teachers have the identities, skills and tools necessary for providing quality 21st century education programs.

 

Keywords: Keywords: ICT in technology-based learning practices, Tteacher Eeducation, 21st century 21st century teaching/ learning skills, teacher identity, ICT-based Teacher Education model, ICT in practice teaching, community-supported teacher training, Teacher Ed ucation reform in Chile

 

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Journal Article

Initial Evaluation and Analysis of Post Graduate Trainees' Use of a Virtual Learning Environment in Initial Teacher Training  pp103-112

Alison Hramiak

© Aug 2007 Volume 5 Issue 2, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp87 - 173

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Abstract

This paper describes the initial findings of a longitudinal case study that investigates the use of a virtual learning environment to enhance the placement experience for full time postgraduate certificate in education (PGCE) students. Geographically separated trainees can feel very isolated on placement. The purpose of the VLE was to try to alleviate this by offering a way for trainees to maintain contact and offer mutual support while on placement. A preliminary analysis of the results is used to offer some insight into how this type of support might be improved for future students, by the construction of minimum pedagogical framework for initial teacher training.

 

Keywords: Teacher training, Virtual learning environment, pedagogical framework

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 5 Issue 3, ICEL 2007 / Nov 2007  pp173‑250

Editor: Shirley Williams

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Editorial

The second International Conference on e‑Learning was held in New York during late June 2007. From the wealth of high quality papers submitted some 60 were selected for presentation at the conference. It was a very difficult task to select from these a group for inclusion in the journal, so it was decided that in this edition we would reflect the international nature of the conference and the diversity of learner groups and technologies addressed.

Recently a number of people from around the world have highlighted that children coming through the school system have different learning needs to previous generations, cultural and linguistic backgrounds are also cited as impacting on learning. However it is important that e‑Learning does not concentrate on a single demographic group and the papers in this edition present e‑Learning from different perspectives, including engaging with school‑aged children (O’Neill; Van de Sande and Leinhardt) and their teachers (Balcaen and Hirtz), through to the acceptance of e‑Learning by business (Leyking, Chikova and Loos). Nakayama, Yamamoto and Santiago have investigated the learning characteristics of university students from Japan and this on‑going work provides a useful insight for course developers, while Stoltenberg and Pforte look at the more technical aspects of e‑Learning and describe a prototype system developed for recording presentations.

 

Keywords: affective communication, affective states, assessment, community of practice, computing education, data warehouse, disaffection, distance education, education technology, eigenfaces, eigenvectors, evaluation system, data warehouse, face recognition, faculty development, focus group, higher education, image normalisation, impoverished learning, internet courses, junior faculty, novel program, ontology, ontology, pedagogical framework , performance metric, performance metric, policy document, post compulsory education, principal component analysis, professional development, quality evaluation, satisfaction, short-term module, staff development, statistics, teacher training, teaching practice, virtual entities, virtual environments, virtual learning environment, vocational students, web-based PBL, web-based SRL

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 5 Issue 2 / Jun 2007  pp87‑173

Editor: Shirley Williams

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Editorial

eLearning continues to develop and it is important that as there are developments the opportunity is taken to reflect on the impact of technology on enhancements to learning. In this issue we have included a number of papers that evaluate the use of eLearning from both the point of view of the learners and teachers.

Following best practice the format of the journal is now single column, this will make online reading easier than the old double column format.

 

Keywords: affective communication, affective states, assessment, community of practice, computing education, data warehouse, disaffection, distance education, education technology, eigenfaces, eigenvectors, evaluation system, data warehouse, face recognition, faculty development, focus group, higher education, image normalisation, impoverished learning, internet courses, junior faculty, novel program, ontology, ontology, pedagogical framework , performance metric, performance metric, policy document, post compulsory education, principal component analysis, professional development, quality evaluation, satisfaction, short-term module, staff development, statistics, teacher training, teaching practice, virtual entities, virtual environments, virtual learning environment, vocational students, web-based PBL, web-based SRL

 

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