The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
For general enquiries email administrator@ejel.org
Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop

Information about the current European Conference on e-Learning is available here

For infomation on the International Conference on eLearning, click here

For infomation on the European Conference on Games Based Learning clickhere

 

Journal Article

Implementing Blended Learning at a Developing University: Obstacles in the way  pp101-110

Mswazi Tshabalala et al

© Feb 2014 Volume 12 Issue 1, ICEL2013, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 125

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Abstract: Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) are striving to provide effective learning experiences to address the needs of the digitally‑oriented generation of learners. Blended learning has emerged as a solution to address these needs and has been a dopted by various HEIs. However, not all academic staff members adopt blended learning when it is introduced by their institutions. Although this teaching and learning approach offers various advantages to academic staff, negative perceptions held by acad emic staff may affect its adoption.The purpose of this case study was to investigate the perceptions academic staff have about blended learning and to identify challenges facing academic staff that affected the adoption of blended learning in a Faculty of Education at a developing university in South Africa. The study employed the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) developed by Davis (1993) and the Innovation Diffusion Theory (IDT) by Rogers (1983: 246‑250) in a qualitative exploratory research de sign. The investigation made use of focus group interviews with lecturers and individual interviews with heads of academic departments, as well as the dean of the Faculty. Data gathered pointed to various perceptions and practical problems hindering acade mic staff from adopting blended learning. Amongst these were perceptions pertaining to e‑learning or blended learning policy, faculty support by management, computer skills of students and lecturers, as well as inadequate access for students to computers. This research is unique in that it applies known knowledge in the new context of a small South African university, which is a developing community. Lessons learned from this study will make a contribution to knowledge in the field of higher education, an d will help developing universities to benefit from the research.

 

Keywords: Keywords: blended learning, adoption, academic staff, perceptions, challenges, developing university

 

Share |

Journal Article

Redefining Practice: Challenging Academic and Institutional Traditions With Clinical Distance Learning  pp17-32

Laura E Delgaty

© Apr 2017 Volume 15 Issue 1, Editor: Robert Ramberg, pp1 - 103

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

With the uptake of distance learning (DL), which has actually been marginal for most academics, teaching contexts, traditional power structures and relationships have been transformed, leaving lecturers potentially disenfranchised. Institutional and cultural change is vital, particularly changes concerning academic roles. The advent of DL has caused role ambiguity; however published literature related to academic roles is confusing and lacks clear guidance. For academics involved in post graduate clinical education, information is even more incomplete. Using a framework of communities, this study is a direct response to these concerns. The aim was to systematically and critically evaluate the implementation of clinical DL in an effort to improve practice. Maintaining a practitioner inquiry methodology, this study investigated the development and delivery of a new DL module. Data collection consisted of documentary analysis of meetings, interviews with staff and students, student evaluations and analytics. Data analysis incorporated both quantitative and qualitative methods to triangulate the research findings. New competencies for academics emerged, including leadership and management. Barriers to staff progress included: ambiguity in roles, lack of leadership and unpreparedness for responsibilities, time, and workload. Student barriers included: time, fear, relevance of learning, isolation and increased autonomy. Explicit planning, organisational support and working within communities were requisite to create a ‘sustaining’ technology. This study contributes to educational practice on two levels. Firstly, by striving for rigour, it demonstrates that practitioner inquiry is a legitimate research approach that is accessible and valuable to teachers. Secondly, it adds to useful and applied knowledge concerning DL practice. Avoiding traditional workload assumptions that are erroneous and inaccurate, this study provides new models of organisational roles and responsibilities. The results challenge the evolutionary nature of academia, suggesting working in communities and new competencies are required whilst traditional roles and culture must be redefined.

 

Keywords: Distance learning, clinical education, academic staff, competencies, communities

 

Share |

Journal Issue

Volume 15 Issue 1 / Apr 2017  pp1‑103

Editor: Robert Ramberg

View Contents Download PDF (free)

Keywords: academic staff, attitudes, clinical education, communication, communities, competencies, courses, critical theory, decision-making, Distance learning, e-learning, e-learning projects, e-learning research, E-Learning team, ethical issues, ethnography, expectations, formative e-assessment, Foucault, gaps, health promotion, learning analytics, major project issues, mathematics, Mobile eye tracking methods, motivation, motivation to learn, motivational gap, new model, online distance learning, pedagogy, perception bias, power, pre-course, qualitative research, quality, quality indicators, quality of e-learning, research methodology, satisfaction, service, socio-cultural contexts, staff development, STEM, technology, theory development, training management, training motivation, visitor studies, visual ethnography

 

Share |