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Journal Article

Mediating Diversity and Affection in Blended Learning: a Story With a Happy Ending  pp310-319

Dina Soeiro, António Dias de Figueiredo, Joaquim Armando Gomes Ferreira

© Aug 2012 Volume 10 Issue 3, Special ECEL issue, Editor: Sue Greener and Asher Rospigliosi, pp257 - 379

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Abstract

We had an Interpersonal Relationships course, a large class, around fifty students, working collaboratively in groups where students from different degrees, academic years, and ages, most of them deaf, tried, and to some extent were able, to communicate. We analyze this example of how diversity can be an asset and how learning management systems can act as mediators to overcome the challenges of diversity and the barriers of emotional isolation. We were carrying out a participatory action research project, within a blended learning environment supported by Moodle, to develop collaborative and personal pedagogical strategies to improve the inclusion and engagement of higher education students in their own learning and evaluation. We were using content analysis of the online discussions held by the students, of the reflective descriptions of the classes, of the students’ e‑portfolios, and of the interviews with the students. The paper describes how, in the context of this project, we have discovered that a learning management systems can be a powerful mediator in promoting the inclusion of deaf students and in establishing emotional bridges across gaps that face‑to‑face environments are sometimes unable to span.

 

Keywords: affection, blended-learning, deaf students, diversity, higher education, inclusion, participation

 

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Journal Article

Is a Blended Learning Approach Suitable for Mature, Part‑time Finance Students?  pp111-118

Julia Burgess

© Apr 2008 Volume 6 Issue 2, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp99 - 182

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Abstract

Blended learning is a pedagogy that is sometimes heralded as the answer to some of the problems which part time students face. Creating a module for part‑time students with some e‑learning elements is time consuming and resource intensive. Therefore it must be demonstrated that the investment in such innovations will benefit the students and create wider learning opportunities in the most effective manner. A small investigation has been conducted which has looked at the learning needs of part‑time finance students at The University of Winchester to see whether a blended approach would have benefited their studies. The results of this investigation have been used as the basis for developing the course to allow a more blended style. This paper attempts to outline how the course was designed and to do a preliminary analysis of the use of blended learning for part‑time mature finance students.

 

Keywords: Blended-learning, finance, part-time, mature-student, e-learning

 

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Journal Article

Students’ use of Asynchronous Voice Discussion in a Blended‑Learning Environment: A study of two undergraduate classes  pp360-367

Khe Foon Hew, Wing Sum Cheung

© Oct 2012 Volume 10 Issue 4, ICEL 2012, Editor: Paul Lam, pp360 - 440

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Abstract

Contemporary discussions of education in blended‑learning environments increasingly emphasize the social nature of learning which emphasizes interactions among students, or among students and instructors. These interactions can occur asynchronously using a text based discussion forum. A text‑based discussion forum, however, may not work well for all participants as some find it difficult to explain complex concepts in words, while others complain of being misunderstood due to the absence of verbal cues. In this study, we investigated the use of a Wimba Voice Board to support asynchronous voice discussion. A quasi‑experiment research design involving two classes of undergraduate students was conducted. One of the classes (n = 24 students) used the Wimba Voice Board while the other (n = 18 students) used a text discussion forum in BlackBoard. The results of an independent t‑test analysis suggested that there was no significant difference in the students’ degree of participation in the two classes, asynchronous voice discuss class (M = 2.92, SD = 1.586) and text discussion class (M = 2.78, SD = 1.353), (t = 0.299, df = 40, p = 0.767) at the 0.05 level of significance. However, the online discussion appeared to be more sustained in the asynchronous voice discussion group. Analyses of the students’ reflection data suggested that asynchronous voice discussion have several advantages over text forums. Specifically, an asynchronous voice discussion: enables students to understand one another’s messages better, allows students, who prefer speaking to writing, or students who are not proficient in written English, to participate in the discussion, promotes originality of students’ ideas, and helps to foster a sense of online community.

 

Keywords: blended-learning, asynchronous online discussion, voice board, discussion forum, participation, Wimba Voice Board

 

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Journal Article

Impact of Multi‑media Tutorials in a Computer Science Laboratory Course … An Empirical Study  pp367-375

Medha Dalal

© Jul 2014 Volume 12 Issue 4, Editor: Dr Rikke Ørngreen and Dr Karin Tweddell Levinsen, pp313 - 410

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Abstract

Abstract: Higher education institutes of North America, Europe and far‑east Asia have been leveraging the advances in ICT for quite some time. However, research based knowledge on the use of ICT in the higher education institutes of central and south‑east Asia is still not readily available. The study presented in this paper explores a variant of teaching and learning laboratory sessions using multi‑media in an Indian engineering institute. Multi‑media tutorials were used to self‑teach Linux operating sys tem to the second and third year students of IT and non‑IT branches of engineering degree program. The paper contains the description of the sessions conducted, empirical data, results and impact on students learning. The results reveal that multi‑media tutorials can be highly useful and beneficial in the early years of engineering to create the solid footing needed for further studies. They act as multipliers for capacity building efforts of students and encourage self‑learning.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Multi-media learning, laboratory courses, video-tutorials, blended-learning

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 10 Issue 4, ICEL 2012 / Oct 2012  pp360‑440

Editor: Paul Lam

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Keywords: Multi-disciplinary Learning, Teamwork, Database Application Development, blended-learning, asynchronous online discussion, voice board, discussion forum, participation, Wimba Voice Board, first person point of view, learning in the first person, paramedic science, paramedic science skills, skill acquisition, experiential learning, video learning materials,

 

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