The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

The Global Classroom Project: Learning a Second Language in a Virtual Environment  pp90-106

Brant Knutzen, David Kennedy

© Mar 2012 Volume 10 Issue 1, ICEL 2011, Editor: Philip Balcean, pp1 - 158

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Abstract

This paper reports the progress of a pilot project exploring the integration of a collaborative virtual learning environment (Second Life) with the instruction of English courses at Lingnan University in Hong Kong. An educational partnership was developed with two TESOL teacher‑training courses at Texas A&M University in the US. The project enrolled over 200 participants, with about half from each participating university. Coordination of online activities was done using the Moodle learning management system. A large non‑traditional language learning facility was developed in the Second Life virtual environment in the style of a 1950's American diner on a private island, complete with Cadillac booths, traditional diner booths and tables, and outdoor campfire settings to facilitate conversational groupings. Both IM typed chat and VOIP voice interactions were explored inside the virtual environment. Student behavior observed during the study indicates the conditions which result in the most productive interactions, and also highlights several key problem areas which must be addressed before successful interactions can be achieved. This paper presents a process which has been developed and trialed, and the plans at Lingnan University to adopt it on a wider scale to support the development of language skills.

 

Keywords: collaborative virtual environment, language learning, ESL, educational partnerships

 

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Journal Article

Content and Language Integrated Learning through an online Game in Primary School: A case study  pp243-258

Kyriaki Dourda, Tharrenos Bratitsis, Eleni Griva, Penelope Papadopoulou

© Jun 2014 Volume 12 Issue 3, Special Edition for ECGBL 2013, Editor: Carlos Vaz de Carvalho and Paula Escudeiro, pp227 - 311

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Abstract

Abstract: In this paper an educational design proposal is presented which combines two well established teaching approaches, that of Game‑based Learning (GBL) and Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL). The context of the proposal was the des ign of an educational geography computer game, utilizing QR Codes and Google Earth for teaching English Language to Greek Primary School students. This integration provides a motivational and cognitive basis for language learning, since it represents a me aningful, contextualized activity and on the other hand, gives students the chance to expand their cognitive skills and use more sophisticated language. The proposed game immersed 11 to 12‑year‑old students in problem solving challenges regarding the use of geography in realistic contexts. While attempting to solve these problems, students were engaged in eight‑week collaborative work, involving six levels of gameplay by following hints, provided by QR codes images. The findings of this case study suggest how foreign language learning can successfully take place within a geography game‑based learning environment, and they underscore the efficacy of approaching GBL in terms of performance. Students performance was evaluated through knowledge tests and var ious complex tasks throughout the game play, involving writing and reading skills. In general, students showed positive attitudes towards the game and the post‑test results have significant differences compared to those of the pre‑test, in terms of vocabu lary acquisition and reading skills in the foreign language and geography knowledge. The results also showed that the collaboration required by this game, allowed the students to interact in a controlled environment, where they undertook roles and respons ibilities. To this end, the findings will make an important contribution to the empirical evidence of GBL particularly with regards to its application in primary education.

 

Keywords: Keywords: QR Codes, Google Earth, CLIL, Language learning, GBL

 

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Journal Article

Social media, Collaboration and Social Learning … a Case‑study of Foreign Language Learning  pp339-352

Margrethe Mondahl, Liana Razmerita

© Jul 2014 Volume 12 Issue 4, Editor: Dr Rikke Ørngreen and Dr Karin Tweddell Levinsen, pp313 - 410

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Abstract

Abstract. Social media has created new possibilities for digitally native students to engage, interact and collaborate in learning tasks that foster learning processes and the overall learning experience. Using both qualitative and quantitative data, this article discusses experiences and challenges of using a social media‑enhanced collaborative learning environment in case‑based teaching of foreign languages. Based on social constructivismwe argue that foreign language learning is an individual as well a s collaborative process and cognitive processes underlying learning and in particular foreign language learning are facilitated by means of social media and especially for new generation of students. This article contributes to understanding of how best t o make use of social media in an educational setting and how learning may be fostered in social, collaborative knowledge construction, sharing and building. The case‑study findings indicate that collaborative learning processes that are embedded in a soci al media enhanced learning platform are supportive and conducive to successful problem‑solving which leads to successful adult foreign language learning. Furthermore, the study reports on some of the challenges in using social media and collaborative grou p work for teaching and learning at university level.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Web 2.0, collaborative learning, foreign language learning, learning, case-based teaching, social learning, cognitive processes

 

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Journal Article

Better Learning of Chinese Idioms through Storytelling: Current Trend of Multimedia Storytelling  pp455-466

Ee Hui Li, Soon Hin Hew

© Oct 2017 Volume 15 Issue 5, Editor: Rikke Ørngreen and Karin Levinsen, pp367 - 466

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Abstract

Storytelling plays a vital role to impart a nation’s tradition, cultural beliefs and history to future generation. It is frequently used for the purpose of sharing or exchanging information as it enables the messages to be conveyed to the audience easily. Storytelling acts as a tool of human social interaction and is commonly used in education for learning, explaining and entertaining. Due to the learning effectiveness brought up by storytelling, this study is aimed to compare and differentiate the feasibility of traditional storytelling and multimedia storytelling in motivating and leveraging the non‑native novices’ learning of Chinese idioms. A total of 83 non‑native novices who have attended the Chinese as Foreign Language Course in a local private university of Malaysia were selected as the research sample and divided into two groups. 43 participants were placed in the experimental group and studied the Chinese idioms with a developed multimedia storytelling prototype (MSP), whereas the other 40 participants in the conventional teaching group learned the new knowledge through traditional storytelling. A Chinese idiom test and survey questionnaires were distributed to the non‑native novices to examine their learning achievement and preferences towards the learning approaches. Results showed that the students in the experimental group scored higher and had greater satisfaction towards the Chinese idiom learning than the learners from the conventional group.

 

Keywords: multimedia storytelling; traditional storytelling; foreign language learning; Chinese idiom learning; non-native novices

 

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Journal Article

Game‑Based Language Learning for Pre‑School Children: A Design Perspective  pp39-48

Bente Meyer

© Feb 2013 Volume 11 Issue 1, ECGBL, Editor: Patrick Felicia, pp1 - 79

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Abstract

During the last decade there has been a growing focus on preschool learning within education, especially with regard to the learning of basic literacies such as reading and writing. In addition to this many nation states increasingly focus on the basic literacy competences of the information society, ICT and English. This has, as suggested by for instance Scanlon and Buckingham (2007) boosted opportunities for the sale of educational material and hardware to children for home learning, but also for learning material that links content directly to the curriculum, to school work and to assessment. This paper will focus on the design of learning material for pre‑school teaching and learning through the example of a game‑based platform for learning English called Mingoville.com. Mingoville has been studied in connection with the project Serious Games on a Global Market Place (2007‑11), where a number of games were followed into classroom environments across nations. Currently, the developers of Mingoville are working on a platform version that targets preschool learners and works on tablets as well as pcs and smartboards. The paper will discuss the implications of redesigning the platform for pre‑school teaching and learning and how this affects game‑based language teaching and learning with Mingoville.

 

Keywords: language learning, game-based learning, design for preschool learning

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 11 Issue 1, ECGBL / Feb 2013  pp1‑79

Editor: Patrick Felicia

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Editorial

Special ECGBL 2012 issue of EJEL

 

The papers in this special issue of The Electronic Journal of eLearning have been selected from the papers presented at The 6th European Conference on Games Based Learning, Cork, Ireland 4‑5th October 2012.

 

This special issue has been edited by Patrick Felicia, Waterford Institute of Technology, Ireland.

 

patrick_felicia 

 

Keywords: blended game-based learning, physically interactive digital games, hero's journey, innovation and change management training, teaching game-based learning, citizenship education, game-based learning, dialogic pedagogy, new media, learning outcomes, social media technology, social business gaming, digital game-based learning (DGBL), information systems (IS), information systems security (ISS) and student assessment and learning, language learning, game-based learning, design for preschool learning, expertise-reversal effect, redundancy effect, fading, adaptable, serious game, fine-tuning system, problem-based learning, scaffolding, ZPD, peer-tutoring, game technology model, platform independent game technology model, serious games engineering, model driven engineering, games based learning, model driven serious games development

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 15 Issue 5 / Oct 2017  pp367‑466

Editor: Rikke Ørngreen, Karin Levinsen

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Editorial

 

Keywords: Open Teaching; Open Educational Practices; Open Educational Resources; MOOC; Information and Communication Technologies; Open Education; E-learning, E-Resources, e-learning, open and distance education, pre-service teachers, e-Learning practice, continuum, use, e-Teaching, e-Learning, traditional, innovation, systems engineering, systems thinking, systems approach, system dynamics, systems engineering education, systems thinking assessment, educational games, experience accelerator, experiential learning, game-based learning, system analysis and design, systems engineering and theory, simulation, Feasibility, e-learning, Iranian university, strategies, gamification, games and learning, drivers, barriers, teachers, Higher Education, connectivity, subject advisor, integration, curriculum delivery, 21st Century, South Africa, multimedia storytelling; traditional storytelling; foreign language learning; Chinese idiom learning; non-native novices

 

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