The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
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Journal Article

Applying Web‑Enabled Problem‑Based Learning and Self‑Regulated Learning to Enhance Computing Skills of Taiwan's Vocational Students: a Quasi‑Experimental Study of a Short‑Term Module  pp148-157

Pei-Di Shen Tsang-Hsiung Lee, Chia-Wen Tsai

© Aug 2007 Volume 5 Issue 2, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp87 - 173

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Abstract

Contrary to conventional expectations, the reality of computing education in Taiwan's vocational schools is not so practically oriented, and thus reveals much room for improvement. In this context, we conducted a quasi‑experiment to examine the effects of applying web‑based problem‑based learning (PBL), web‑based self‑ regulated learning (SRL), and their combination to enhance students' computing skills in a short‑term module of deploying Microsoft Word. Two classes of 106 first‑year students were divided into 2 (PBL vs. non‑PBL) × 2 (SRL vs. non‑SRL) experimental groups. Results were generally positive. This study thus provided a significant illustration of a promising design and implementation of chosen web‑based pedagogies for a short‑term module. With limitations in mind, we hope that the lesson learned is also useful for those teachers engaged in e‑learning, specifically, in vocational schools.

 

Keywords: web-based PBL, web-based srl, e-learning, vocational students, computing education, short-term module

 

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Journal Article

Exploring Students use of ICT and Expectations of Learning Methods  pp13-20

Allison Littlejohn, Anoush Margaryan, Gabriele Vojt

© Jan 2010 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Shirley Williams, pp1 - 50

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Abstract

This study investigates changing patterns in students use of electronic tools over a four year period, mapping changes in social communications with expectations in formal learning. The data, collected from 2001 to 2004, reflect the views of 2215 university entrants, the majority of whom were aged between 17 and 20 years across a range of disciplines (Business, Science and Engineering) on their first day at university. Although the data was collected prior to the emergence of the contemporary social technologies, it tests an underlying assertion that students expectations of learning are strongly influenced by their prior experiences. Results show no correlation between the extent of university entrants use of Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) and their expectations of how they will learn. Despite a dramatic increase in students use of ubiquitous technologies over a four‑year period, their expectation of how they might learn at university remained relatively static over the same timeframe.

 

Keywords: ICT use, digital literacy, technology-enhanced learning, e-learning, students expectations of technology use, higher education

 

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Journal Article

A Different Vision in eLearning: Metaphors  pp105-114

Nazime Tuncay, Ioana Andreea Stanescu, Mustafa Tuncay

© Apr 2011 Volume 9 Issue 1, ECEL 2010 special issue, Editor: Carlos Vaz de Carvalho, pp1 - 114

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Abstract

Metaphors are figures of speech in which a word or phrase that denotes a certain object or idea is applied to another word or phrase to imply some similarity between them. Due to their ability to make speaking and writing more lively and interesting, metaphors have always been popular among students. While metaphors provide significant enhancement of contexts and build upon the sense of community, they can limit the boundaries of the communication between students and teachers. In order to carry out student oriented courses, teachers ought to consider the metaphors students use. In an effort to understand and fill in this communication gap, the authors of this paper have initiated a study that aimed to drive out the e‑education students’ metaphors in order to suggest a vision for future e‑courses. The authors have designed the “E‑Education Metaphor Analysis Survey” that comprised 35 items and captured data about e‑education students’ metaphors. The questionnaire was posted on Surveymonkey.com and was distributed to e‑education students in two countries: Turkey and Cyprus. 352 students filled the questionnaire. The answers revealed that the metaphors students use are influenced by their way of life, their personal characteristics, their educational background and their feelings. Internet was the most common metaphor used for e‑education. A very interesting fact was that 47% of the students considered E‑Student to be equivalent to “rich students’ education” and that the term recalled them the metaphor “richness”. Although there were many research studies on common metaphors and their impact on e‑education, there were no studies in the literature about eLearning metaphors. This paper presents an innovative approach that focuses on 7 key research questions and represents a first step of a more detailed future project undertaken by the authors.

 

Keywords: eLearning, metaphors, students, SurveyMonkey

 

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Journal Article

Mediating Diversity and Affection in Blended Learning: a Story With a Happy Ending  pp310-319

Dina Soeiro, António Dias de Figueiredo, Joaquim Armando Gomes Ferreira

© Aug 2012 Volume 10 Issue 3, Special ECEL issue, Editor: Sue Greener and Asher Rospigliosi, pp257 - 379

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Abstract

We had an Interpersonal Relationships course, a large class, around fifty students, working collaboratively in groups where students from different degrees, academic years, and ages, most of them deaf, tried, and to some extent were able, to communicate. We analyze this example of how diversity can be an asset and how learning management systems can act as mediators to overcome the challenges of diversity and the barriers of emotional isolation. We were carrying out a participatory action research project, within a blended learning environment supported by Moodle, to develop collaborative and personal pedagogical strategies to improve the inclusion and engagement of higher education students in their own learning and evaluation. We were using content analysis of the online discussions held by the students, of the reflective descriptions of the classes, of the students’ e‑portfolios, and of the interviews with the students. The paper describes how, in the context of this project, we have discovered that a learning management systems can be a powerful mediator in promoting the inclusion of deaf students and in establishing emotional bridges across gaps that face‑to‑face environments are sometimes unable to span.

 

Keywords: affection, blended-learning, deaf students, diversity, higher education, inclusion, participation

 

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Journal Article

Media Use in Higher Education from a Cross‑National Perspective  pp226-238

Michael Grosch

© Aug 2013 Volume 11 Issue 3, ECEL 2012, Editor: Hans Beldhuis and Koos Winnips, pp168 - 272

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Abstract

Abstract: The web 2.0 has already penetrated the learning environment of students ubiquitously. This dissemination of online services into tertiary education has led to constant changes in students’ learning and study behaviour. Students use services such as Google and Wikipedia most often not only during free time but also for learning. At the same time, traditional information media such as textbooks or printed hand‑outs still form basic pillars in their learning environment. To measure the media usage for learning and how it changes an international long term media survey in tertiary education was set up by the author and other cooperation partners. Until February 2013, 12,000 students from five countries were asked 143 questions about their media use for learning and close‑by topics. The results of the survey include an acceptance ranking of 53 media services, a comparison of media acceptance in five countries, data on possession of IT devices and a comparison of students and teachers media acceptance.

 

Keywords: Keywords: media, higher education, students, e-learning, web 2.0, internationalisation

 

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Journal Article

Mobile Learning: A Kaleidoscope  pp52-76

Marlena Kruger, Riana Bester

© Feb 2014 Volume 12 Issue 1, ICEL2013, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 125

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Abstract

Abstract: CTI is an accredited private higher education institution (university) with the Higher Education Council (HEC) in South Africa. Its head office is in Fourways, Johannesburg. CTI has 12 campuses nationwide and offers higher certificates and d egrees in commerce and information technology. These BCom and BSc degrees were rolled out to all 12 campuses from January 2013. All first year students received 10⠜ Samsung tablets with their textbooks and course materials in digital format. We⠒ve wor ked closely with all role‑players to ensure that all pillars for successful implementation of the e‑book tablet project are in place. Timeous completion and conversion of course materials and e‑textbooks for the start of the academic year in 2013 took ext ra time and focus of a dedicated project manager and multi‑disciplinary team members. Several aspects were focused on during the conceptual, preparation and planning phases in 2012 (phase 1). This phase included aspects such as the student pilot project to establish the most suitable tablet to procure for students and lecturers, upgrading of infrastructure on campuses, lecturer training and the development of support materials, guidelines and rules for user standards. Phase 2 started in January 2013 wit h the implementation of a design‑based research project which includes several planned interventions to ensure continuous development and support of lecturers and students with the focus on enhancing the academic experience of students. During this phase qualitative and quantitative methodologies were implemented and included the sharing of experiences using different digital media, tools and instruments to gather data from lecturers, students and other role‑players. Data was analysed and compared with di fferent theoretical frameworks for using integrating innovative technologies in learning environments. Changes that took place in teaching and learning practices will be discussed by way of using the technology integration matrix and other measurements to determine the development and movement of teachin

 

Keywords: Keywords: mobile learning, e-textbooks, tablet computers, faculty development, students enhancement of academic experience

 

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Journal Article

Reflections of Students language Usage in Social Networking Sites: Making or Marring Academic English  pp301-315

Saraswathy Thurairaj, Er Pek Hoon, Swagata Sinha Roy, Pok Wei Fong

© Apr 2015 Volume 13 Issue 4, ECEL 2014, Editor: Kim Long, pp205 - 315

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Abstract

Abstract : Social networking sites (SNSs) have become a major form of communication in todays day and age whereby language use has been impacted in various areas especially in that of learning and teaching. Young users use literally half their week eng aging in SNSs communication, thereby giving rise to a brand of internet slang which is entirely their own. This youth‑speak has gone on to influence other areas of language usage. The questions asked in the survey increased the identification of the lingu istic features such as the frequency of code switching and erratic spelling and leet, thus expanding the research base. The survey participants, the majority of who are from the Chinese ethnic group had experienced mother tongue interference in their Engl ish Language proficiency. The descriptive statistical method was used to analyse the questionnaires, wherein the data collected indicated a rather excessive usage of short messaging texts by almost all respondents owning a mobile device. To authenticate t he research findings, an analysis of the text discourses was found to be necessary. The findings proved that the frequent use of short messaging had not majorly affected the English language proficiency of the participants. In academic writing there was a conscious effort to stay clear of SNSs language. The mushrooming SNSs has helped create a whole young generation who have their own meta‑language, which provides an opportunity to probe to what extent the English language is altered. This research shoul d kick‑start research on how the English language in these areas is used and whether the frequent use of it can develop or weaken proficiency in the language. The results of the present study will definitely enrich the corpus of work conducted on the infl uence of language of social media and encourage further detailed research in this area.

 

Keywords: Keywords: students language usage, linguistic features, mobile phone, technology uses in education, e-learning, academic writing, classroom environment and social networking sites

 

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Journal Article

Synthesizing Technology Adoption and Learners Approaches Towards Active Learning in Higher Education  pp442-451

Kevin Chan, George Cheung, Kelvin Wan, Ian Brown, Green Luk

© Dec 2015 Volume 13 Issue 6, ICEL 2015, Editor: Pandora Johnson, pp429 - 474

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Abstract

Abstract: In understanding how active and blended learning approaches with learning technologies engagement in undergraduate education, current research models tend to undermine the effect of learners variations, particularly regarding their styles and a pproaches to learning, on intention and use of learning technologies. This study contributes to further examine a working model for learning outcomes in higher education with the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) on SRS adoption attitude, and the Study Process Questionnaire (SPQ) on students approach to learning. Adopting a cross‑section observational design, the current study featured an online survey incorporating items UTAUT and SPQ. The survey was administered to 1627 und ergraduate students at a large comprehensive university in Hong Kong. Relationships between SRS adoption attitude, learning approaches, and learning outcomes in higher‑order thinking & learning and collaborative learning were analyzed with a structural eq uation model (SEM). A total of 3 latent factors, including four factors from UTAUT in Performance Expectancy, Effort Expectancy, and Deep Learning Approach from the SPQ, were identified in the structural model on students intention to adopt SRS in clas ses. Current results suggested that a model of active learning outcomes comprising both UTAUT constructs and deep learning approach. Model presented in the present study supported the UTAUT in predicting both behavioral intention and in adopting SRS in la rge classes of undergraduate education. Specifically, positive attitudes towards SRS use measured with the UTAUT, via a learning approach towards deep learning, accounted for variation on high‑impact learning including higher‑order thinking and collaborat ive learning. Results demonstrated that the process of technology adoption should be conceptualized in conjunction with learners diversity for explaining variation in adoption of technologies in the higher education context.

 

Keywords: Keywords: Technology adoption, Learning Approaches, Students Response System, SRS, Higher Education

 

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