The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
For general enquiries email administrator@ejel.org
Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop

Information about the current European Conference on e-Learning is available here

For infomation on the International Conference on eLearning, click here

For infomation on the European Conference on Games Based Learning clickhere

 
Journal Issue
Volume 10 Issue 3, Special ECEL issue / Aug 2012  pp257‑379

Editor: Sue Greener, Asher Rospigliosi

Download PDF (free)

Editorial for the ECEL 2011 Special Issue of EJEL  pp257‑258

Sue Greener, Asher Rospigliosi

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Starting online: Exploring the use of a Social Networking Site to Facilitate transition into Higher Education  pp259‑263

John Knight, Rebecca Rochon

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Cognitive communication 2.0 in Higher Education: to tweet or not to tweet?  pp264‑276

António Andrade, Cornélia Castro, Sérgio André Ferreira

Look inside Download PDF (free)

A Case of Problem Based Learning for Cross‑Institutional Collaboration  pp277‑285

Chrissi Nerantzi

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Research ethics in emerging forms of online learning: issues arising from a hypothetical study on a MOOC  pp286‑296

Antonella Esposito

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Comparing Childrens E‑safety Strategies with Guidelines Offered by Adults  pp297‑309

Birgy Lorenz, Kaido Kikkas, Mart Laanpere

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

The ways our children are using Internet have changed significantly within the last five years: the Web experience is more personalised, social, open, self‑regulated and oriented towards ripping, remixing, sharing, following, reflecting. As a result, also e‑learning has recently become more social and open, involving the use of personal learning environments or social networks. We believe that the schools are not ready for this yet, as strategies and regulations supporting open learning are not up to date . It may seem easier to restrict the use of e.g. Twitter or Facebook rather than integrate them into the learning process. In 2011, we carried out the qualitative analysis of 201 e‑safety related short stories presented by students (aged 12 to 16), pa rents, teachers, school IT managers and police officials, collected through the Safer Internet in Estonia EE SIC campaign. 2/3 of the stories are fictional … they may be based on urban legends which however appear to refer to real stories. 1/3 of the sto ries reflect real incidents. We mapped typical behaviour patterns and beliefs regarding privacy as well as the regulations and limitations concerning the use of social networks at schools. Our study shows that typical safety incidents are not solved adeq uately when existing regulations are used by the schools. We found that most of the solutions used by schools to ensure e‑safety are either technical or purely regulation‑based, only some schools appeared to have studied or elaborated on pedagogical or be havioural aspects. Problems are defied by limitations and regulations, while actual safety incidents (whether in‑ or outside school) remain largely unsolved (or even undetected). Thus there is an urgent need for information and working guidance mechan isms for managers, teachers, parents and students. These matters must be solved before schools reach the critical mass in using e‑learning, social networks and modern gadgetry as parts of curriculum. Keywords: online safety, schools, policy, new technolog ies, social media 

 

Keywords: online safety, schools, policy, new technologies, social media

 

Share |
Mediating Diversity and Affection in Blended Learning: a Story With a Happy Ending  pp310‑319

Dina Soeiro, António Dias de Figueiredo, Joaquim Armando Gomes Ferreira

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Empathy and Dignity through technology: using lifeworld‑led multimedia to enhance learning about the head, heart and hand  pp320‑330

Andy Pulman, Kathleen Galvin, Maggie Hutchings, Les Todres, Anne Quinney, Caroline Ellis-Hill, Peter Atkins

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Getting the Message: supporting students’ transition from Higher National to degree level study and the role of mobile technologies  pp331‑341

Julia Fotheringham, Emily Alder

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Exploring a ‘middle ground’: engagement with students in a social learning environment.  pp342‑350

Anne MJ Smith, Sonya Campbell

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Fostering a web 2.0 ethos in a traditional e‑learning environment  pp351‑359

Marie Martin, Michaela Noakes

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Fostering a web 2.0 ethos in a traditional e‑learning environment  pp360‑368

Marie Martin, Michaela Noakes

Look inside Download PDF (free)