The Electronic Journal of e-Learning provides perspectives on topics relevant to the study, implementation and management of e-Learning initiatives
For general enquiries email administrator@ejel.org
Click here to see other Scholarly Electronic Journals published by API
For a range of research text books on this and complimentary topics visit the Academic Bookshop

Information about the current European Conference on e-Learning is available here

For infomation on the International Conference on eLearning, click here

For infomation on the European Conference on Games Based Learning clickhere

 
Journal Issue
Volume 7 Issue 3, Special ICEL 2009 Issue / Dec 2009  pp191‑316

Editor: Florin Salajan, Avi Hyman

Download PDF (free)

Investigating a Nigerian XXL‑Cohort Wiki‑Learning Experience: Observation, Feedback and Reflection  pp191‑202

Peter Aborisade

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Weblogs in Higher Education — why do Students (not) Blog?  pp203‑214

Monika Andergassen, Reinhold Behringer, Janet Finlay, Andrea Gorra, David Moore

Look inside Download PDF (free)

GEARS a 3D Virtual Learning Environment and Virtual Social and Educational World Used in Online Secondary Schools  pp215‑224

Jonathan Barkand, Joseph Kush

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Moving From Analogue to High Definition e‑Tools to Support Empowering Social Learning Approaches  pp225‑238

Paula Charbonneau-Gowdyand, Ivana Cechova

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Efficacy of Teaching Clinical Clerks and Residents how to Fill out the Form 1 of the Mental Health Act Using an e‑Learning Module  pp239‑246

Sarah Garside, Anthony Levinson, Sophie Kuziora, Michael Bay, Geoffrey

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Blended Learning in the Visual Communications Classroom: Student Reflections on a Multimedia Course  pp247‑256

Jennifer George-Palilonis, Vincent Filak

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Abstract

Advances in digital technology and a rapidly evolving media landscape continue to dramatically change teaching and learning. Among these changes is the emergence of multimedia teaching and learning tools, online degree programs, and hybrid classes that blend traditional and digital content delivery. At the same time, visual communication programs that are traditionally print‑centric have had to make room for Web design and multimedia storytelling courses, as well as technical skills development. To add parsimony to these two areas of study, we chronicle how a blended model has been introduced in a required, 100‑level visual communication course through a longitudinal study that followed 174 students through two versions of the same course, one that used blended learning strategies and one that participated in a more traditional method of course delivery. In combining an analysis of statements made by the participants in weekly journals (n=13,552) and the data gathered through a survey (n=174), we compared reactions between the two groups. Additionally, qualitative data from the journals was used to fully explicate the reactions students had to the course. This study sheds light on the effectiveness of a blended model in the context of students' enjoyment, engagement, and perceived learning outcomes. The results revealed that the blended model was in no way different from the traditional course in terms of engagement and attachment. Journal data revealed students in the blended sections were significantly less negative about the course material, personal achievement, technology, and their emotional reactions than their traditional counterparts. Additionally, statements made by students regarding the issue of fear of the course and problems regarding technology substantially faded over the 15‑week semester. Our overall findings indicate that students are able to adapt well to the technology and processes that make blended learning different from traditional classroom learning. Implications for pedagogy and future research are discussed. 

 

Keywords: blended learning, visual communication, multimedia teaching and learning

 

Share |
Podcasting to Support Students Using a Business Simulation  pp257‑264

Andrea Gorra, Janet Finlay

Look inside Download PDF (free)

e‑Modeling — Helping Learners to Develop Sound e‑Learning Behaviours  pp265‑272

Susan Greener

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Measuring the Effectiveness of Educational Technology: what are we Attempting to Measure?  pp273‑280

Jodie Jenkinson

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Eating Your Lectures and Having Them too: is Online Lecture Availability Especially Helpful in "Skills‑Based" Courses?  pp281‑288

Steve Joordens, Ada Le, Raymond Grinnell, Sophie Chrysostomou

Look inside Download PDF (free)

When Knowing More Means Knowing Less: Understanding the Impact of Computer Experience on e‑Learning and e‑Learning Outcomes  pp289‑300

Lena Paulo Kushnir

Look inside Download PDF (free)

A Novel Interactive Online Module in a Traditional Curriculum through a Blended Learning Approach  pp301‑308

Leslie Laing Gibbard, Florin Salajan

Look inside Download PDF (free)

Development of the Novel e‑Learning System, "SPES NOVA" (Scalable Personality‑Adapted Education System with Networking of Views and Activities)  pp309‑316

Ken Takeuchi, Manabu Murakami, Atsushi Kato, Ryuichi Akiyama, Hirotaka Honda, Hajime Nozawa, Ki-ichiro Sato

Look inside Download PDF (free)